Search results for 'David John Chalmers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David John Chalmers (2010). The Character of Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    What is consciousness? How does the subjective character of consciousness fit into an objective world? How can there be a science of consciousness? In this sequel to his groundbreaking and controversial The Conscious Mind, David Chalmers develops a unified framework that addresses these questions and many others. Starting with a statement of the "hard problem" of consciousness, Chalmers builds a positive framework for the science of consciousness and a nonreductive vision of the metaphysics of consciousness. He replies (...)
     
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  2.  4
    John Chalmers David (1998). [Book Review] the Conscious Mind, in Search of a Fundamental Theory. [REVIEW] Science and Society 62 (4).
  3.  13
    Martin Rudwick, Naomi Oreskes, David Oldroyd, David Philip Miller, Alan Chalmers, John Forge, David Turnbull, Peter Slezak, David Bloor, Craig Callender, Keith Hutchison, Steven Savitt & Huw Price (1996). Review Symposia. Metascience 5 (1):7-85.
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  4.  61
    Gareth B. Matthews New, Andrew R. Bailey, Sarah Buss, Steven M. Cahn, Howard Caygill, David J. Chalmers, John Christman, Michael Clark, David E. Cooper & Simon Critchley (2002). Books for Review and for Listing Here Should Be Addressed to Emily Zakin, Review Editor, Department of Philosophy, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056. Teaching Philosophy 25 (4):403.
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  5.  10
    David Turnbull, Henry Krips, Val Dusek, Steve Fuller, Alan Sokal, Jean Bricmont, Alan Frost, Alan Chalmers, Anna Salleh, Alfred I. Tauber, Yvonne Luxford, Nicolaas Rupke, Steven French, Peter G. Brown, Hugh LaFollette, Peter Machamer, Nicolas Rasmussen, Andy J. Miller, Marya Schechtman, Ross S. West, John Forge, David Oldroyd, Nancy Demand, Darrin W. Belousek, Warren Schmaus, Sungook Hong, Rachel A. Ankeny, Peter Anstey, Jeremy Butterfield & Harshi Gunawardena (2000). Clarity, Charity and Criticism, Wit, Wisdom and Worldliness: Avoiding Intellectual Impositions. [REVIEW] Metascience 9 (3):347-498.
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    David Oldroyd, Phil Dowe, Adrian Mackenzie, Alison Bashford, Geoffrey C. Bowker, Alan Chalmers, I. J. Crozier, John Dargavel, Wendy Riemens & Andrew Dowling (1997). A Miller's Tale. Metascience 6 (1):105-184.
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  7. David J. Chalmers (1999). Materialism and the Metaphysics of Modality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (2):473-96.
    This appeared in Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59:473-93, as a response to four papers in a symposium on my book The Conscious Mind . Most of it should be comprehensible without having read the papers in question. This paper is for an audience of philosophers and so is relatively technical. It will probably also help to have read some of the book. The papers I’m responding to are: Chris Hill & Brian McLaughlin, There are fewer things in reality than are (...)
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  8. David J. Chalmers (2004). Imagination, Indexicality, and Intensions. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):182-90.
    John Perry's book Knowledge, Possibility, and Consciousness is a lucid and engaging defense of a physicalist view of consciousness against various anti-physicalist arguments. In what follows, I will address Perry's responses to the three main anti-physicalist arguments he discusses: the zombie argument , the knowledge argument , and the modal argument.
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  9. David J. Chalmers (1992). Subsymbolic Computation and the Chinese Room. In J. Dinsmore (ed.), The Symbolic and Connectionist Paradigms: Closing the Gap. Lawrence Erlbaum 25--48.
    More than a decade ago, philosopher John Searle started a long-running controversy with his paper “Minds, Brains, and Programs” (Searle, 1980a), an attack on the ambitious claims of artificial intelligence (AI). With his now famous _Chinese Room_ argument, Searle claimed to show that despite the best efforts of AI researchers, a computer could never recreate such vital properties of human mentality as intentionality, subjectivity, and understanding. The AI research program is based on the underlying assumption that all important aspects (...)
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  10. David J. Chalmers (1997). On ``Consciousness and the Philosophers''.
    John Searle's review of my book The Conscious Mind appeared in the March 6, 1997 edition of the New York Review of Books. I replied in a letter printed in their May 15, 1997 edition, and Searle's response appeared simultaneously. I set up this web page so that interested people can see my reply to Searle in turn, and to give access to other relevant materials.
     
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  11. David J. Chalmers (1997). Response to Searle. New York Review of Books 44 (8).
    In my book _The Conscious Mind_ , I deny a number of claims that John Searle finds "obvious", and I make some claims that he finds "absurd". But if the mind/body problem has taught us anything, it is that nothing about consciousness is obvious, and that one person's obvious truth is another person's absurdity. So instead of throwing around this sort of language, it is best to examine the claims themselves and the arguments that I give for them, to (...)
     
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  12.  67
    Michael Esfeld (2013). Contemporary Metaphysics: Review of David J. Chalmers, Constructing the World, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2012, 494 Pages; John Heil, The Universe as We Find It, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2012, 311 Pages; and Theodore R. Sider, Writing the Book of the World, Oxford: Oxford University Press 2011, 318 Pages. [REVIEW] Metaphysica 14 (1):143-148.
    Metaphysics is definitely back on the agenda of contemporary philosophy. It is a metaphysics in the full traditional sense, seeking to provide the means to gain knowledge that covers being as a whole, not just parts of it. Oxford University Press published three books in 2011 and 2012 each of which spells out that ambition. The present review sums up the main topics covered in these books and offers some comments.
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  13.  6
    Robert John & Sheffler Manning (1990). David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion: Otherness in History and in Text. Religious Studies 26 (3):415.
    In the autumn of 1915 at Princeton, the graduate student, Charles Hendel, and the professor, Norman Kemp Smith, went for a walk. Hendel thought the time auspicious to announce his desire to write a dissertation on Rousseau. As happens not infrequently between an adviser and a student, Kemp Smith attempted to dissuade his student from his intention and advised him to look into David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion , instead. The professor noted that a ‘deadlock’ had long existed (...)
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  14. David J. Chalmers (2006). The Foundations of Two-Dimensional Semantics. In Manuel Garcia-Carpintero & Josep Macia (eds.), Two-Dimensional Semantics: Foundations and Applications. Oxford University Press 55-140.
    Why is two-dimensional semantics important? One can think of it as the most recent act in a drama involving three of the central concepts of philosophy: meaning, reason, and modality. First, Kant linked reason and modality, by suggesting that what is necessary is knowable a priori, and vice versa. Second, Frege linked reason and meaning, by proposing an aspect of meaning (sense) that is constitutively tied to cognitive signi?cance. Third, Carnap linked meaning and modality, by proposing an aspect of meaning (...)
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  15.  7
    Cohen Ga, If You’re an Egalitarian, Crocker Robert, Reason Religion, Crockett Clayton, DUPRÉ John & Human Nature (2002). CHARLES David and William Child (Eds): Wittgensteinian Themes: Essays. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):325-330.
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  16.  28
    Eileen John (2008). Review of David Davies, Aesthetics and Literature. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (9).
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  17.  7
    Michael A. Bishop, J. D. Trout, L. Johannes Brandl, Marian David, Leopold Stubenberg, Herman Cappelen & Ernie Lepore (2005). Appearance in This List Neither Guarantees nor Precludes a Future Review of the Book. Agamben, Giorgio, Trans. Kevin Attell, State of Exception, London and Chicago: Univer-Sity of Chicago Press, 2005, Pp. Vii+ 95,£ 8.50, $12.00. Aiken, William and John Haldane (Eds), Philosophy and Its Public Role, Exeter, UK and Charlottesville, VA: Imprint Academic, 2004, Pp. Vi+ 272,£ 14.95, $29.90. [REVIEW] Mind 114:454.
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  18. David J. Chalmers (2004). Phenomenal Concepts and the Knowledge Argument. In Peter Ludlow, Yujin Nagasawa & Daniel Stoljar (eds.), There's Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson's Knowledge Argument. MIT Press 269.
    *[[This paper is largely based on material in other papers. The first three sections and the appendix are drawn with minor modifications from Chalmers 2002c . The main ideas of the last three sections are drawn from Chalmers 1996, 1999, and 2002a, although with considerable revision and elaboration. ]].
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  19. David J. Chalmers & Brian Rabern (2014). Two-Dimensional Semantics and the Nesting Problem. Analysis 74 (2):210-224.
    Graeme Forbes (2011) raises some problems for two-dimensional semantic theories. The problems concern nested environments: linguistic environments where sentences are nested under both modal and epistemic operators. Closely related problems involving nested environments have been raised by Scott Soames (2005) and Josh Dever (2007). Soames goes so far as to say that nested environments pose the “chief technical problem” for strong two-dimensionalism. We call the problem of handling nested environments within two-dimensional semantics “the nesting problem”. We show that the two-dimensional (...)
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  20. David J. Chalmers (1998). On the Search for the Neural Correlate of Consciousness. In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A.C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness II. MIT Press 2--219.
    *[[This paper appears in _Toward a Science of Consciousness II: The Second Tucson Discussions and Debates_ (S. Hameroff, A. Kaszniak, and A.Scott, eds), published with MIT Press in 1998. It is a transcript of my talk at the second Tucson conference in April 1996, lightly edited to include the contents of overheads and to exclude some diversions with a consciousness meter. A more in-depth argument for some of the claims in this paper can be found in Chapter 6 of my (...)
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  21. David J. Chalmers, Scott Soames' Two-Dimensionalism.
    Scott Soames’ Reference and Description contains arguments against a number of different versions of two-dimensional semantics. After early chapters on descriptivism and on Kripke’s anti-descriptivist arguments, a chapter each is devoted to the roots of twodimensionalism in “slips, errors, or misleading suggestions” by Kripke and Kaplan, and to the two-dimensional approaches developed by Stalnaker (1978) and by Davies and Humberstone (1981). The bulk of the book (about 200 pages) is devoted to “ambitious twodimensionalism”, attributed to Frank Jackson, David Lewis, (...)
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  22.  47
    John Mark Bishop (2002). Counterfactuals Cannot Count: A Rejoinder to David Chalmers. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):642-652.
    The initial argument presented herein is not significantly original—it is a simple reflection upon a notion of computation originally developed by Putnam and criticised by Chalmers et al. . In what follows, instead of seeking to justify Putnam’s conclusion that every open system implements every Finite State Automaton and hence that psychological states of the brain cannot be functional states of a computer, I will establish the weaker result that, over a finite time window every open system implements the (...)
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  23.  97
    Thomas W. Polger (2014). Review of David J. Chalmers, Constructing the World. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 65 (2):419-423.
    David Chalmers burst onto the philosophical scene in the mid-1990s with his work on consciousness, which awakened slumbering zombie arguments against physicalism and transformed the explanatory gap into the hard problem of consciousness. The distinction between hard and easy problems of consciousness became a central dogma of the movement. Chalmers’ influence in philosophy and consciousness studies is unquestionable. But enthusiasts of Chalmers’ work on consciousness may be excused for not fully appreciating his own justification for drawing (...)
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  24. Massimo Pigliucci (2013). What Hard Problem? Philosophy Now (99).
    The philosophical study of consciousness is chock full of thought experiments: John Searle’s Chinese Room, David Chalmers’ Philosophical Zombies, Frank Jackson’s Mary’s Room, and Thomas Nagel’s ‘What is it like to be a bat?’ among others. Many of these experiments and the endless discussions that follow them are predicated on what Chalmers famously referred as the ‘hard’ problem of consciousness: for him, it is ‘easy’ to figure out how the brain is capable of perception, information integration, (...)
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  25. Steffen Borge (2007). A Modal Defence of Strong AI. In Dermot Moran Stephen Voss (ed.), The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy. The Philosophical Society of Turkey 127-131.
    John Searle has argued that the aim of strong AI of creating a thinking computer is misguided. Searle’s Chinese Room Argument purports to show that syntax does not suffice for semantics and that computer programs as such must fail to have intrinsic intentionality. But we are not mainly interested in the program itself but rather the implementation of the program in some material. It does not follow by necessity from the fact that computer programs are defined syntactically that the (...)
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  26.  63
    Brendan O'sullivan (2010). Taking Referentialism Seriously: A Response to the Modal Argument. Theoria 76 (1):54-67.
    I argue that an identity theorist can successfully resist a Kripkean modal argument by employing what I call a metaconceptual move. Furthermore, by showing how this move fails to apply straightforwardly to Chalmers' argument, I clarify the nature of the threat presented by Chalmers and how it differs from a Kripkean modal argument.
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  27. Steffen Borge (1999). All You Zombies. David Chalmers’ Metaphysical Solipsism. In Uwe Meixner Peter Simons (ed.), Metaphysics in the Post-Metaphysical Age. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society
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  28.  38
    Justin Tiehen (2013). Constructing the World. By David Chalmers. Oxford University Press, 2012, Pp. 528, £30. ISBN: 978-0-19-960857-7. [REVIEW] Philosophy 88 (4):630-635.
    A review of Constructing the World, by David Chalmers.
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  29. David M. Braun, Comment on David Chalmers' "Probability and Propositions".
    Propositions are the referents of the ‘that’-clauses that appear in the direct object positions of typical ascriptions of assertion, belief, and other binary cognitive relations. In that sense, propositions are the objects of those cognitive relations. Propositions are also the semantic contents (meanings, in one sense ) of declarative sentences, with respect to contexts. They are what sentences semantically express, with respect to contexts. Propositions also bear truth-values. The truth-value of a sentence, in a context, is the truth-value of the (...)
     
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  30.  19
    Ellen W. Bernal (2008). Review of Planning for Uncertainty: Living Wills and Other Advance Directives for You and Your Family , 2nd Edition by David John Doukas, M.D., and William Reichel, M.D. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):1-3.
    Advance directives are useful ways to express one's wishes about end of life care, but even now most people have not completed one of the documents. David Doukas and William Reichel strongly encourage planning for end of life care. Although Planning for Uncertainty is at times fairly abstract for the general reader, it does provide useful background and practical steps.
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  31.  81
    Ingo Brigandt (2013). A Critique of David Chalmers' and Frank Jackson's Account of Concepts. ProtoSociology 30:63–88.
    David Chalmers and Frank Jackson have promoted a strong program of conceptual analysis, which accords a significant philosophical role to the a priori analysis of concepts. They found this methodological program on an account of concepts using two-dimensional semantics. This paper argues that Chalmers and Jackson’s account of concepts, and the related approach by David Braddon-Mitchell, is inadequate for natural kind concepts as found in biology. Two-dimensional semantics is metaphysically faulty as an account of the nature (...)
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  32.  4
    Daniel Luporini de Faria (2016). Chalmers, David. The conscious mind. Cadernos Do Pet Filosofia 6 (11).
    Resenha do livro "The conscious mind" de David Chalmers.
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  33.  34
    Arthur B. Cody (1997). Consciousness: Of David Chalmers and Other Philosophers of Mind. Inquiry 40 (4):379 – 405.
    On reading David Chalmers's book, The Conscious Mind (Oxford/New York: Oxford University Press, 1996), one is struck by the author's efforts to meet the difficulties and obscurities in understanding the human mind, as indeed most other philosophers have, by hazarding theories. Such undertakings rest on two broad, usually unexamined, assumptions. One is that we have direct access to our conscious minds such that pronouncements about it and its contents are descriptive. The other is that our actions have causal (...)
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  34.  2
    F. M. Gray (2004). John Hick: A Critical Introduction and Reflection, by David Cheetham. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi 4.
    David Cheetham's text, 'John Hick: A Critical Introduction and Reflection' is an extensive introduction to the equally extensive work of philosopher of religion, John Hick. Cheetham traces the development of Hick's thinking from Hick's early adoption of phenomenological approaches to his articulation of a religious pluralism that attempts to read together the world's major religious traditions. Cheetham engages with Hick's defenders and critics, painstakingly analysing the themes which have occupied the minds of philosophers of religion during the (...)
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  35.  6
    Aaron Garrett (2005). Review of : The Library of Scottish Philosophy_; Review of James Otteson: _Adam Smith: Selected Philosophical Writings_; Review of James Harris: _James Beattie: Selected Philosophical Writings_; Review of David Boucher: _The Scottish Idealists: Selected Philosophical Writings_; Review of Jonathan Friday: _Art and Enlightenment: Scottish Aesthetics in the 18th Century_; Review of Gordon Graham: _Scottish Philosophy: Selected Writings 1690–1960_; Review of Esther McIntosh: _John Macmurray: Selected Philosophical Writings. [REVIEW] Journal of Scottish Philosophy 3 (2):181-186.
    The Library of Scottish Philosophy: Volumes 1 – 6, Exeter: Imprint Academic, 2004 James Otteson , ed. Adam Smith: Selected Philosophical Writings, 247pp. Paperback £12.95. ISBN 184540-001-1 James Harris , ed. James Beattie: Selected Philosophical Writings, 204pp. Paperback £12.95. ISBN 0907845-711 David Boucher , ed. The Scottish Idealists: Selected Philosophical Writings, 201pp. Paperback £12.95. ISBN 0907845-72X Jonathan Friday , ed. Art and Enlightenment: Scottish Aesthetics in the 18th century, 212pp. Paperback £12.95. ISBN 0907845-762 Gordon Graham , ed. Scottish Philosophy: (...)
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  36. George Berkeley, David Hume & John Locke (1961). The Empiricists John Locke, an Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Abridged by Richard Taylor; George Berkeley, a Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge [and] Three Dialogues ... David Hume, an Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding [and] Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion. --. [REVIEW] Doubleday.
  37.  10
    Michael Mcdonald (1995). Towards a Contemporary Theodicy: Based on Critical Review of John Hick, David Griffin and Sri Aurobindo. Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    The author seeks to make the fewest changes that would allow Christianity to withstand the challenges of the problem of evil . The project includes a critical review of the theodicies of John Hick and David Griffin, and also draws upon the thought of Sri Aurobindo. ;From Augustinian thought, the author retains the emphasis upon moral evil. He argues that any theodicy resolving moral evil also resolves natural evil, and that natural evil, as such, would not create major (...)
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  38. George Herbert Mead, John Monroe Brewster, Albert Millard Dunham, David L. Miller & Charles William Morris (1967). The Philosophy of the Act. Edited, with Introd. By Charles W. Morris in Collaboration with John M. Brewster, Albert M. Dunham [and] David L. Miller. [REVIEW] The University of Chicago Press.
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  39. Matthias Neuber (2013). David J. Chalmers: Constructing the World. [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 68:648-652.
  40.  47
    R. P. Cameron (2010). Metametaphysics, Edited by David J. Chalmers, David Manley, and Ryan Wasserman. Mind 119 (474):459-462.
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  41.  26
    Anthony Dardis (2012). Metametaphysics: New Essays on the Foundations of Ontology Edited by David J. Chalmers , David Manley , and Ryan Wasserman . Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2009. Pp. 529. [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 43 (4):513-522.
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  42.  1
    W. H. Auden (2004). ACKERLY, BROOKE,“Susan Moller Okin (1946-2004)”[Tribute], 446. ALFORD, C. FRED,“Levinas and Political Theory,” 146. ARMITAGE, DAVID,“John Locke, Carolina, and the Two Treatises of Government,” 602. BELL, DANIEL A.,“Human Rights and Social Criticism in Contemporary Chinese Political Theory”[Review Essay], 396. [REVIEW] Political Theory 32 (6):885-889.
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  43. William Clark (2007). David John Frank; Jay Gabler.Reconstructing the University: Worldwide Shifts in Academia in the Twentieth Century. Foreword by John W. Meyer. Xvii + 248 Pp., Figs., Tables, Apps., Bibl., Index. Stanford, Calif.: Stanford University Press, 2006. $19.95. [REVIEW] Isis 98 (4):870-871.
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  44. R. Kirk (1996). David J. Chalmers, The Conscious Mind. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3:522-522.
  45. J. Pathrapankal (1998). Little Traditions in the Bible and Their Significance for the Biblical Religion (Joseph, Ruth, Saul, David, John the Baptist, Mary, Jesus, Paul, Revelation). Journal of Dharma 23 (1):39-56.
     
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  46. Sydney Shoemaker (1999). On David Chalmers's The Conscious Mind. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (2):439-444.
  47.  36
    Guy Fletcher (2011). Review of Ben Eggleston, Dale Miller & David Weinstein (Eds.), John Stuart Mill and the Art of Life. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews.
  48.  31
    Andrew W. Howat (2006). Review: David L. Hildebrand. Beyond Realism & Anti-Realism: John Dewey and the Neopragmatists. Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 2003. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):296-302.
  49. Chhanda Chakraborti (2002). Metaphysics of Consciousness, and David Chalmers's Property Dualism. Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 19 (2):59-84.
  50. Richard Brown (2013). Chalmers' “Unholy Stew”: Review of 'Constructing the World' by David Chalmers. [REVIEW] The Philosophers' Magazine 61 (61):115-118.
    This highly technical book is densely packed with arguments and is an important addition to the literature. Even if one ultimately disagrees with Chalmers there is much to be gained in his exhaustive study, and he goes out of his way to show how one can accept limited or modified versions of scrutability. It is impossible for me to do justice to his argumentative rigor and comprehensive coverage of possible views in the space I have here. In the end (...)
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