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David K. Chan [18]David K. K. Chan [1]David Kum-Wah Chan [1]
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Profile: David K. Chan (University of Wisconsin - Stevens Point)
  1. David K. Chan (2014). The Concept of Human Dignity in the Ethics of Genetic Research. Bioethics 28 (6).
    Despite criticism that dignity is a vague and slippery concept, a number of international guidelines on bioethics have cautioned against research that is contrary to human dignity, with reference specifically to genetic technology. What is the connection between genetic research and human dignity? In this article, I investigate the concept of human dignity in its various historical forms, and examine its status as a moral concept. Unlike Kant's ideal concept of human dignity, the empirical or relational concept takes human dignity (...)
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  2. David K. Chan (2013). Just War, Noncombatant Immunity, and the Concept of Supreme Emergency. Journal of Military Ethics 11 (4):273 - 286.
    (2012). JUST WAR, NONCOMBATANT IMMUNITY, AND THE CONCEPT OF SUPREME EMERGENCY. Journal of Military Ethics: Vol. 11, No. 4, pp. 273-286. doi: 10.1080/15027570.2012.758399.
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  3. David K. Chan (2012). Beyond Just War: A Virtue Ethics Approach. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Unlike most books on the ethics of war, this book rejects the 'just war' tradition, proposing a virtue ethics of war to take its place.
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  4. David K. Chan (2012). Editor's Introduction. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (2):1-3.
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  5. David K. Chan (2012). Moral Reasoning and Decisions on the Ground. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 19 (2):15-25.
    In this paper, I examine the difference between decision-making by soldiers and commanders, compared with leaders of the nation. Decision-makingin the armed forces is prudential reasoning concerned with the best means to achieve given military objectives. I argue that those in the military cannot rationally make the moral choice to risk the lives of their own soldiers or jeopardize their mission in order to protect the lives of enemy civilians. This does not vindicate the realists who deny that morality applies (...)
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  6. David K. Chan (2012). The Ethics of War and Law Enforcement in Defending Against Terrorism. Social Philosophy Today 28:101-114.
    There are two contrasting paradigms for dealing with terrorists: war and law enforcement. In this paper, I first discuss how the just war theory assesses the military response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the United States. I argue that the ethical problems with the U.S. attack on Afghanistan in response to 9/11 concern principles of jus ad bellum besides just cause. I show that the principles of right intention, last resort, proportionality and likelihood of success were violated. Furthermore, both (...)
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  7. David K. K. Chan (2011). In Search of an Ethical University: A Proposed East–West Integrative Vision. Ethics and Education 6 (3):267 - 278.
    This article employs a sociological analysis of the changing role and mission of higher education from that of a ?public good? to that of a service industry. In this regard, the rise of modern universities as corporate enterprises in the recent decades has often neglected the important dimension of education as a process of enlightenment, with its ethical and moral dimensions. The author tries to put into perspective the relevance of searching for an ?ethical university? by proposing to integrate the (...)
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  8. David K. Chan (2010). A Reappraisal of the Doctrine of Doing and Allowing. In Joseph Keim Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & Harry S. Silverstein (eds.), Action, Ethics, and Responsibility. MIT Press.
     
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  9. David K. Chan (2010). Reasoning Without Comparing. American Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):153-164.
  10. David K. Chan (ed.) (2008). Moral Psychology Today: Essays on Values, Rational Choice, and the Will. Springer Verlag.
    This volume is an edited collection of original papers on the theme of Values, Rational Choice, and the Will.
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  11. David K. Chan (2007). Wrongful Life, Wrongful Disability, and the Argument Against Cloning. Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):257-272.
    Philosophical problems with the concept of wronging someone in bringing the person into existence, especially the non-identity problem, have been much discussed in connection with forms of assisted reproduction that carry risks of harms either greater than or not otherwise present in natural reproduction. In this essay, I discuss the meaning of claims of wrongful life, distinguishing them from claims of wrongful disability. Attempts to conceptualize wrongful disability in terms of either the harmed existence of the offspring, or the possibility (...)
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  12. David K. Chan (2006). How War Affects People. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (1):1-5.
    What do philosophers have to say about war beyond appeal to the just war doctrine? I suggest that they should concern themselves with the harmful consequences of war for the people who experience it. The ancient Greek tragedian Euripides was a moral philosopher of his time who wrote the plays Hecuba and The Trojan Women from the perspective of the losers in the Trojan War. There are striking parallels to the U.S. war in Iraq that began in 2003. Lessons that (...)
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  13. David K. Chan (2005). Active Voluntary Euthanasia and the Problem of Intending Death. Journal of Philosophical Research 30 (Supplement):379-389.
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  14. David K. Chan (2005). Should Human Genes Be Patented? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):30-36.
    Is genetic technology a special case, for which patents are inappropriate? I discuss concerns about commodification of human genes that are the common heritage of humankind. Genetic technology has the potential to irreversibly change the basis of our humanity. Public ownership of genetic technology is a democratic alternative to patenting.
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  15. Stella Gonzalez Arnal, Donald Chalmers, David Kum-Wah Chan, Margaret Coffey, Jo Ann T. Croom, Mylène Deschênes, Henrich Ganthaler, Yuri Gariev, Ryuichi Ida, Jeffrey P. Kahn, Martin O. Makinde, Anna C. Mastroianni, Katharine R. Meacham, Bushra Mirza, Michael J. Morgan, Dianne Nicol, Edward Reichman, Susan E. Wallace & Larissa P. Zhiganova (2004). Cross-Cultural Biotechnology: A Reader. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  16. David K. Chan (2004). Are There Extrinsic Desires? Noûs 38 (2):326-50.
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  17. David K. Chan (2003). Review of “Forgiveness and Revenge”. [REVIEW] Essays in Philosophy 4 (2):13.
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  18. David K. Chan (2000). Intention and Responsibility in Double Effect Cases. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (4):405-434.
    I argue that the moral distinction in double effect cases rests on a difference not in intention as traditionally stated in the Doctrine of Double Effect (DDE), but in desire. The traditional DDE has difficulty ensuring that an agent intends the bad effect just in those cases where what he does is morally objectionable. I show firstly that the mental state of a rational agent who is certain that a side-effect will occur satisfies Bratman's criteria for intending that effect. I (...)
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  19. David K. Chan (1999). A Not-so-Simple View of International Action. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (1):1–16.
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  20. David K. Chan (1995). Non-Intentional Actions. American Philosophical Quarterly 32 (2):139 - 151.
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