Search results for 'David K. Hardman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David K. Hardman (1998). Discussion de-Focusing on the Wason Selection Task: Mental Models or Mental Inference Rules? A Commentary on Green and Larking (1995). Thinking and Reasoning 4 (1):83 – 94.score: 870.0
    Mental models theorists have proposed that reasoners tend to focus on what is explicit in their mental models, and that certain debiasing procedures can induce them to direct their attention to other relevant information. For instance, Green and Larking 1995; also Green, 1995a facilitated performance on the Wason selection task by inducing participants to consider counterexamples to the conditional rule. However, these authors acknowledged that one aspect of their data might require some modification to the mental models theory. This research (...)
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  2. Aimun AB Jamjoom, Stuart M. White, Simon M. Walton, Jonathan G. Hardman & Iain K. Moppett (2010). Anaesthetists' and Surgeons' Attitudes Towards Informed Consent in the UK: An Observational Study. BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):2.score: 240.0
    The attitudes of patients' to consent have changed over the years, but there has been little systematic study of the attitudes of anaesthetists and surgeons in this process. We aimed to describe observations made on the attitudes of medical professionals working in the UK to issues surrounding informed consent.
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  3. David Hardman (2000). The Understanding/Acceptance Principle: I Understand It, but Don't Accept It. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):677-678.score: 240.0
    Can the understanding/acceptance principle help us to decide between alternative normative theories? There is little evidence that this principle can successfully be applied; there are no strong normative statements in Stanovich & West's target article. There is also no evidence for success of rational norms when applied to real life decisions.
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  4. David Hardman (1998). Does Reasoning Occur on the Selection Task? A Comparison of Relevance-Based Theories. Thinking and Reasoning 4 (4):353 – 376.score: 240.0
    Does reasoning occur on the Wason selection task, or are card selections determined purely on the basis of heuristic processes? To answer this question two relevance-based theories of reasoning are compared: (1) the theory of Evans (1984, 1989; Evans & Over, 1996), which takes the heuristic viewpoint, and (2) the theory of Sperber, Cara, and Girotto (1995), which takes the reasoning viewpoint. In three experiments, the effect of removing matching cards from the selection task array is examined. It is argued (...)
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  5. David Hardman (1996). Mental Models: The Revised Theory Brings New Problems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):542-543.score: 240.0
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  6. David Hardman & A. V. Judges (1954). Notes and News. British Journal of Educational Studies 3 (1):72-75.score: 240.0
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  7. David W. Green (1998). Refocusing on the Data: A Reply to Hardman. Thinking and Reasoning 4 (1):95 – 96.score: 30.0
    Hardman in press claims that the results of Green and Larking 1995 favour a mental rules theory account of performance in the selection task over a mental model theory account. This reply rebuts his claim.
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