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  1. David Farrell Krell (forthcoming). Closing Remarks. Journal of Nietzsche Studies.
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  2. David Farrell Krell (2014). The Force and Logic of Imagination: On Elemental Self-Showing. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):217-231.
    John Sallis, Force of Imagination: The Sense of the Elemental. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 2000, pp. 237 + xiv.John Sallis, Logic of Imagination: The Expanse of the Elemental. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 2012, pp. 287.The most common German word for imagination, especially after Kant, is Einbildungskraft. If one were to translate John Sallis’s title, Force of Imagination, back into German, it would be something like Die Kraft der Einbildungskraft. “Force” would constitute the beginning and the end, (...)
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  3. David Farrell Krell (2013). Derrida and Our Animal Others: Derrida's Final Seminar, the Beast and the Sovereign. Indiana University Press.
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  4. David Farrell Krell (2013). Following Afterness. Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):274-296.
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  5. David Farrell Krell (2013). Following Afterness: Gerhard Richter. Afterness: Figures of Following in Modern Thought and Aesthetics. New York: Columbia University Press, 2011. 245 Pp. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 43 (2):274-296.
     
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  6. David Farrell Krell (2013). The Way Back Down: Paul Klee's Heights and Depths. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):331-339.
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  7. David Farrell Krell (2012). Derrida on Heidegger and . . . Robinson Crusoe? Review of : Jacques Derrida, Seminaire: La Bete Et le Souverain, Volume II (2002–2003). Edited by Michel Lisse, Marie-Louise Mallet, and Genette Michaud. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 42 (3):437-466.
  8. David Farrell Krell (2012). Ethics, Indifference, and Social Concern. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17:75-88.
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  9. David Farrell Krell (2012). Heidegger and the Art of Sculpture. Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):117-129.
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  10. David Farrell Krell (2012). Klee and Novalis: Apprentices at Saïs. In Paul Klee (ed.), Paul Klee: Philosophical Vision, From Nature to Art. Mcmullen Museum of Art, Boston College.
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  11. David Farrell Krell (2012). Narrative as Trauma and Resilience. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):75-88.
    After listing a series of topics in Scott’s Living with Indifference that I would have wanted to address but, if only for reasons of space, could not, I focus on the uses of narrative or fiction in Scott’s book. I am particularly interested in the relation of fiction to trauma. It is the resilience of fiction that perhaps enables it to speak—or to write—so eloquently about traumatic occurrences. As a writer of fiction, I am gripped by the proximity and even (...)
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  12. David Farrell Krell (2012). Of Dog and God. Research in Phenomenology 42 (2):269-295.
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  13. David Farrell Krell (2010). Review Articles. Research in Phenomenology 40 (1):141-149.
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  14. David Farrell Krell (2010). Response to My “Scholar's Session,” Spep 2009. Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):38-50.
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  15. David Farrell Krell (2010). Twelve Anacoluthic Theses on Adorno's "Parataxis : On Hölderlin's Late Poetry". In Gerhard Richter (ed.), Language Without Soil: Adorno and Late Philosophical Modernity. Fordham University Press.
     
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  16. Friedrich Holderlin & David Farrell Krell (2009). The Death of Empedocles: A Mourning-Play. State University of New York Press.
    The definitive scholarly edition and new translation of all three versions of Hölderlin’s poem, The Death of Empedocles, and his related theoretical essays.
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  17. David Farrell Krell (2009). Forever Younger: A Reading of Sophocles' Antigone. Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (1):55-75.
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  18. Friedrich Hölderlin & David Farrell Krell (2008). The Death of Empedocles. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):289-311.
    The definitive scholarly edition and new translation of all three versions of Hölderlin’s poem, The Death of Empedocles, and his related theoretical essays.
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  19. David Farrell Krell (2008). The Death of Empedocles. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):289-311.
    The definitive scholarly edition and new translation of all three versions of Hölderlin’s poem, The Death of Empedocles, and his related theoretical essays.
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  20. David Farrell Krell (2007). “A Double Tale I Shall Tell . . . ”: Empedocles and Hölderlin on Tragic Nature and Tragic Purification. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):287-304.
    Countless poets and thinkers over the ages have identified closely with Empedocles of Acragas. Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843) is one of these. The threeversions of his mourning-play, The Death of Empedocles, give us an opportunity to conceive of the unity of the Empedoclean project—to confront nature and humanexistence alike as tragic. Central to this tragic view of both On Nature and Purifications, reputedly the two books of Empedocles, is the theme of doubling and duplicity, especially the presence in the (one) sphere (...)
     
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  21. David Farrell Krell (2007). “A Double Tale I Shall Tell . . . ”. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):287-304.
    Countless poets and thinkers over the ages have identified closely with Empedocles of Acragas. Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843) is one of these. The threeversions of his mourning-play, The Death of Empedocles, give us an opportunity to conceive of the unity of the Empedoclean project—to confront nature and humanexistence alike as tragic. Central to this tragic view of both On Nature and Purifications, reputedly the two books of Empedocles, is the theme of doubling and duplicity, especially the presence in the (one) sphere (...)
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  22. David Farrell Krell (2007). Charles Scott's The Lives Of Things. Philosophy Today 51 (2):227-230.
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  23. David Farrell Krell (2006). All You Can't Eat: Derrida's Course, "Rhétorique du Cannibalisme" (1990-1991). Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):130-180.
    In 1990-1991 Jacques Derrida taught a seminar in Paris involving the scientific-philosophical notebooks of the German Romantic writer and thinker Novalis (Friedrich von Hardenberg, 1772-1801). The present article offers an account of that seminar, which was entitled, "The Rhetoric of Cannibalism.".
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  24. David Farrell Krell (2006). One, Two, Four—Yet Where Is the Third? A Note on Derrida's Geschlecht Series. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):341-357.
    Derrida’s Geschlecht series, along with the books Of Spirit and Aporias, constitutes his most sustained close-reading of Heidegger. Three essays of the four-partGeschlecht series have been published: the first, second, and fourth, these together comprising some 130 book pages. The third Geschlecht exists only as a thirty-three-page typescript prepared sometime before March 1985 and distributed to the speakers at a colloquium in Chicago organized by John Sallis. These thirty-three pages are among the 100 to 130 pages that Derrida by his (...)
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  25. David Farrell Krell (2005). The Tragic Absolute: German Idealism and the Languishing of God. Indiana University Press.
    In 'The Tragic Absolute', David Farrell shows that German Idealist and Romantic theories of literature and aesthetic judgement, especially when it comes to tragedy, are closer to the heart of metaphysics and ethics that previously thought.
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  26. David Farrell Krell (2004). Nietzschean Reminiscences of Schelling's Philosophy of Mythology (1842). Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):181-193.
    Nietzschean reminiscences of Schelling? The title seems to suggest either that Schelling can remember forward to Nietzsche or that some more positive reminiscence of Schelling lies hidden in Nietzsche’s work. Perhaps there is something like a forward-looking remembrance. Perhaps every thinker looks forward to those few who will pick up the thread of his or her thinking—not as the “unthought” of that thinking, but as the very thread that Ariadne ravels and allows to trail behind her. Perhaps too there is (...)
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  27. Thomas J. Altizer, Edward Casey, Thomas L. Dumm, Elizabeth Grosz, David Karnos, David Farrell Krell, Alphonso Lingis, Gerald Majer, Janice McLane, Jean-Luc Nancy & Mary Zournazi (2003). Encounters with Alphonso Lingis. Lexington Books.
     
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  28. David Farrell Krell (2003). Holderlin's Tragic Heroines : Jocasta, Antigone Niobe, Danak. In Rudolf Bernet & Daniel J. Martino (eds.), Phenomenology Today: The Schuwer Spep Lectures, 1998-2002. Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center, Duquesne University.
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  29. David Farrell Krell (2002). Three Ends of the Absolute: Schelling on Inhibition, Hölderlin on Separation, and Novalis on Density. Research in Phenomenology 32 (1):60-85.
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  30. David Farrell Krell (2000). The Purest of Bastards: Works of Mourning, Art, and Affirmation in the Thought of Jacques Derrida. Penn State University Press.
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  31. David Farrell Krell (1998). Contagion: Sexuality, Disease, and Death in German Idealism and Romanticism. Indiana University Press.
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  32. David Farrell Krell (1997). Archeticture: Ecstasies of Space, Time, and the Human Body. State University of New York Press.
    Calls for rethinking architecture as a way of renegotiating our encounter with the world, taking into account the role of love and desire in all human making.
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  33. David Farrell Krell (1997). Son of Spirit: A Novel. State University of New York Press.
    A historical novel, this is the beautifully-told story of Louis Hegel, illegitimate son of the philosopher G.W.F. Hegel. Ultimately disowned by his father and forced to use his mother's name, Louis died in Indonesia, as Ludwig Fischer, at the age of 24--the bastard son of SPIRIT.
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  34. David Farrell Krell (1996). Ecstatic Places? Research in Phenomenology 26 (1):262-276.
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  35. David Farrell Krell (1996). Infectious Nietzsche. Indiana University Press.
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  36. David Farrell Krell (1996). Nietzsche: A Novel. State University of New York Press.
    This historical-biographical novel fleshes out the facts of Nietzsche's life with fictional treatment. Using untraditional narrative techniques and interweaving medical reports, actual letters, and original new text, the novel takes the last years of Nietzsche's life, the years of insanity, as a frame for the entire life.
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  37. David Farrell Krell (1995). Lunar Voices: Of Tragedy, Poetry, Fiction, and Thought. University of Chicago Press.
    David Farrell Krell reflects on nine writers and philosophers, including Heidegger, Derrida, Blanchot, and Holderlin, in a personal exploration of the meaning of sensual love, language, tragedy, and death. The moon provides a unifying image that guides Krell's development of a new poetics in which literature and philosophy become one. Krell pursues important philosophical motifs such as time, rhythm, and desire, through texts by Nietzsche, Trakl, Empedocles, Kafka, and Garcia Marquez. He surveys instances in which poets or novelists explicitly address (...)
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  38. David Farrell Krell (1995). Reading Plato (After Nietzsche & Co.). Research in Phenomenology 25 (1):45-67.
  39. David Farrell Krell (1992). Daimon Life: Heidegger and Life-Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
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  40. David Farrell Krell (1992). Das Unheimliche: Architectural Sections of Heidegger and Freud. Research in Phenomenology 22 (1):43-61.
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  41. David Krell & Edward S. Casey (1992). Once More Into the Verge. Research in Phenomenology 22 (1):186-199.
  42. John D. Caputo, Miguel De Beistegui, Charles M. Sherover, Adriaan Peperzak, Jacob Rogozinski, Kevin McCoy, Leonard Lawlor, Calvin O. Schrag, Rudi Visker & David Farrell Krell (1991). Brill Online Books and Journals. Research in Phenomenology 21 (1).
     
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  43. David Farrell Krell (1991). A Thought in Full Self-Dispossession: On Charles Scott's The Language of Difference and The Question of Ethics. Research in Phenomenology 21 (1):142-148.
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  44. David Farrell Krell (1991). Foreign Bodies in Strange Places. Philosophy Today 35 (1):43-50.
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  45. David Farrell Krell (1991). Madness and Philosophy. International Studies in Philosophy 23 (2):55-63.
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  46. David Farrell Krell (1991). Shattering: Toward a Politics of Daimonic Life. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 14 (2/1):153-182.
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  47. David Farrell Krell (1990). Intimations of Mortality: Time, Truth, and Finitude in Heidegger's Thinking of Being. Penn State University Press.
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  48. David Farrell Krell (1990). Le Plus Pur Des Batards (l'Affirmation Sans Issue). Revue Philosophique de la France Et de L'Étranger 180 (2):229 - 238.
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  49. David Farrell Krell (1990). Of Memory, Reminiscence, and Writing: On the Verge. Indiana UP.
    "Krell creates a remarkable interplay of meanings, allusions, and connotations—an interplay of multiple resonance which is finely tuned to Derrida's thought and which makes his essay as artful as it is conceptually disciplined.
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  50. David Farrell Krell & David Wood (1990). Beneath the Time of the Line: The Future of Memory. In David Wood (ed.), Writing the Future. Routledge.
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