114 found
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  1.  6
    David Farrell Krell (2016). Troubled Brows. Research in Phenomenology 46 (2):309-335.
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  2. David Farrell Krell (ed.) (2010). Basic Writings: Martin Heidegger. Routledge.
    Few philosophers have had more influence on the shape of western philosophy after 1900 than Martin Heidegger. _Basic Writings_ offers a full range of this profound and controversial thinker’s writings in one volume, including: _The Origin of the Work of Art_ The introduction to _Being and Time_ _What Is Metaphysics?_ _Letter on Humanism_ _The Question Concerning Technology_ _The Way to Language_ _The End of Philosophy_ Featuring a foreword by Heidegger scholar Taylor Carman, this essential collection provides readers with a concise (...)
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  3. David Farrell Krell (1972). Towards an Ontology of Play : Eugen Fink's Notion of Spiel. Research in Phenomenology 2 (1):63-93.
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  4.  65
    David Farrell Krell (2012). Derrida on Heidegger and . . . Robinson Crusoe? Review of : Jacques Derrida, Seminaire: La Bete Et le Souverain, Volume II (2002–2003). Edited by Michel Lisse, Marie-Louise Mallet, and Genette Michaud. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 42 (3):437-466.
  5.  2
    David Farrell Krell (1992). Daimon Life: Heidegger and Life-Philosophy. Indiana University Press.
    "Daimon Life is life-enchancing. To read it is to become richer in word." –John Llewelyn Disclosure of Martin Heidegger’s complicity with the National Socialist regime in 1933-34 has provoked virulent debate about the relationship between his politics and his philosophy. Did Heidegger’s philosophy exhibit a kind of organicism readily transformed into ideological "blood and soil"? Or, rather, did his support of the Nazis betray a fundamental lack of loyalty to living things? David Farrell Krell traces Heidegger’s political authoritarianism to his (...)
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  6.  4
    David Farrell Krell (2016). History, Natality, Ecstasy: Derrida’s First Seminar on Heidegger, 1964–1965. Research in Phenomenology 46 (1):3-34.
    _ Source: _Volume 46, Issue 1, pp 3 - 34 The article, based on a course taught at the Collegium Phaenomenologicum in 2015, has three sections: 1) Derrida’s first major seminar on Heidegger, taught in 1964–65, asks whether the language of _Sein_ is ontological or mere “ontic metaphor”; 2) Derrida notes that the first paragraphs on historicity in _Being and Time_ offer an intriguing interpretation of birth as “the other end of Dasein”; 3) Derrida focuses on the theme of the (...)
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  7.  9
    David Farrell Krell (2015). Emerson—Nietzsche's Voluptuary? Comparative and Continental Philosophy 7 (1):8-17.
    This article reflects on the complex nature of Nietzsche's enduring appreciation of Emerson. Rather than rely on merely coincidental similarities between the two thinkers, the essay discerns a more difficult relationship—that of friendship—which somehow, perhaps through character, unites the two without making them the same.
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  8.  89
    David Farrell Krell (2006). All You Can't Eat: Derrida's Course, "Rhétorique du Cannibalisme" (1990-1991). Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):130-180.
    In 1990-1991 Jacques Derrida taught a seminar in Paris involving the scientific-philosophical notebooks of the German Romantic writer and thinker Novalis (Friedrich von Hardenberg, 1772-1801). The present article offers an account of that seminar, which was entitled, "The Rhetoric of Cannibalism.".
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  9.  8
    David Farrell Krell (2015). Heidegger’s Black Notebooks, 1931–1941. Research in Phenomenology 45 (1):127-160.
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  10.  68
    David Farrell Krell (1982). Phenomenology of Memory From Husserl to Merleau-Ponty. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 42 (4):492-505.
    A critical appraisal of husserl's lectures on internal time-Consciousness and passive synthesis (touching the theme of memory) is followed by an appreciation of merleau-Ponty's "problem of passivity". I argue that husserl's descriptions of memory processes embody prejudices stemming from the 'objective time' he claims to have bracketed out and that his phenomenological method is itself a phenomenon of the mathematical imagination. The latter pursues inherited ideals of clarity, Evidence, Immanence and presence which distort all mnemonic phenomena. Merleau-Ponty eschews the representational (...)
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  11.  36
    David Farrell Krell (1985). The Oldest Program Towards a System in German Idealism. The Owl of Minerva 17 (1):5-19.
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  12.  36
    David Farrell Krell (2012). Heidegger and the Art of Sculpture. Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):117-129.
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  13. David Farrell Krell (2000). The Purest of Bastards: Works of Mourning, Art, and Affirmation in the Thought of Jacques Derrida. Penn State University Press.
    The “deconstruction” that is commonly seen to be the method of Derrida’s philosophy has an inescapably negative connotation. To counter this view of Derrida’s thought as basically destructive, David Farrell Krell invites readers to understand how it may instead be seen as fundamentally affirmative—just as Nietzsche’s philosophy, so allegedly nihilistic, is at heart a call for tragic affirmation, in _amor fati_. But, while affirmative, Derrida is also engaged in a thinking of mourning, which he views as the promise of memory—a (...)
     
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  14.  36
    David Farrell Krell (2006). One, Two, Four—Yet Where Is the Third? A Note on Derrida's Geschlecht Series. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):341-357.
    Derrida’s Geschlecht series, along with the books Of Spirit and Aporias, constitutes his most sustained close-reading of Heidegger. Three essays of the four-partGeschlecht series have been published: the first, second, and fourth, these together comprising some 130 book pages. The third Geschlecht exists only as a thirty-three-page typescript prepared sometime before March 1985 and distributed to the speakers at a colloquium in Chicago organized by John Sallis. These thirty-three pages are among the 100 to 130 pages that Derrida by his (...)
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  15.  2
    David Farrell Krell (2005). The Tragic Absolute: German Idealism and the Languishing of God. Indiana University Press.
    "This is vintage Krell—he is as always, a reader in the best sense of the word...." —Dennis J. Schmidt "Krell is a strong and often eloquent writer.
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  16.  11
    David Farrell Krell (1987). Paradoxes of the Pineal: From Descartes to Georges Bataille. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 21:215-228.
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  17.  5
    David Farrell Krell (1992). Das Unheimliche: Architectural Sections of Heidegger and Freud. Research in Phenomenology 22 (1):43-61.
  18.  25
    David Farrell Krell (2012). Of Dog and God. Research in Phenomenology 42 (2):269-295.
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  19.  7
    David Farrell Krell (2002). Three Ends of the Absolute: Schelling on Inhibition, Hölderlin on Separation, and Novalis on Density. Research in Phenomenology 32 (1):60-85.
    "Three Ends of the Absolute" discusses Schelling's notion of inhibition in the philosophy of nature, Hölderlin's notion of separation in his "Seyn, Urtheil, Modalität," and Novalis' notion of the density of God in his late scientific notes. All three thinkers can be contrasted with Hegel on the basis of their attacks on philosophical absolutes. Schelling , in his First Projection of a Philosophy of Nature , reflects on the conundrum of absolute inhibition in nature, an inhibition of absolute freedom that (...)
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  20.  26
    David Farrell Krell (1991). Madness and Philosophy. International Studies in Philosophy 23 (2):55-63.
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  21.  12
    David Farrell Krell (2014). The Force and Logic of Imagination: On Elemental Self-Showing. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):217-231.
    John Sallis, Force of Imagination: The Sense of the Elemental. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 2000, pp. 237 + xiv.John Sallis, Logic of Imagination: The Expanse of the Elemental. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 2012, pp. 287.The most common German word for imagination, especially after Kant, is Einbildungskraft. If one were to translate John Sallis’s title, Force of Imagination, back into German, it would be something like Die Kraft der Einbildungskraft. “Force” would constitute the beginning and the end, (...)
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  22.  6
    David Farrell Krell (1981). Results. The Monist 64 (4):467-480.
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  23.  17
    David Farrell Krell (2004). Nietzschean Reminiscences of Schelling's Philosophy of Mythology (1842). Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (2):181-193.
    Nietzschean reminiscences of Schelling? The title seems to suggest either that Schelling can remember forward to Nietzsche or that some more positive reminiscence of Schelling lies hidden in Nietzsche’s work. Perhaps there is something like a forward-looking remembrance. Perhaps every thinker looks forward to those few who will pick up the thread of his or her thinking—not as the “unthought” of that thinking, but as the very thread that Ariadne ravels and allows to trail behind her. Perhaps too there is (...)
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  24.  6
    David Farrell Krell (2007). Charles Scott's The Lives Of Things. Philosophy Today 51 (2):227-230.
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  25.  13
    David Farrell Krell (2012). Narrative as Trauma and Resilience. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):75-88.
    After listing a series of topics in Scott’s Living with Indifference that I would have wanted to address but, if only for reasons of space, could not, I focus on the uses of narrative or fiction in Scott’s book. I am particularly interested in the relation of fiction to trauma. It is the resilience of fiction that perhaps enables it to speak—or to write—so eloquently about traumatic occurrences. As a writer of fiction, I am gripped by the proximity and even (...)
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  26. David Farrell Krell (2005). The Tragic Absolute: German Idealism and the Languishing of God. Indiana University Press.
    "This is vintage Krell—he is as always, a reader in the best sense of the word...." —Dennis J. Schmidt "Krell is a strong and often eloquent writer... I regard this to be one of his most important works...." —Jason M. Wirth In The Tragic Absolute, David Farrell Krell shows that German Idealist and Romantic theories of literature and aesthetic judgment, especially when it comes to tragedy, are closer to the heart of metaphysics and ethics than previously thought. Krell not only (...)
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  27.  26
    David Farrell Krell (1995). Reading Plato (After Nietzsche & Co.). Research in Phenomenology 25 (1):45-67.
  28.  19
    David F. Krell (1972). Socrates' Body. Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (4):443-451.
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  29.  3
    David Farrell Krell (1991). A Thought in Full Self-Dispossession: On Charles Scott's The Language of Difference and The Question of Ethics. Research in Phenomenology 21 (1):142-148.
  30.  4
    David Farrell Krell (1996). Ecstatic Places? Research in Phenomenology 26 (1):262-276.
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  31.  7
    David Farrell Krell (2013). The Way Back Down: Paul Klee's Heights and Depths. Research in Phenomenology 43 (3):331-339.
    The present essay offers a brief commentary on Paul Klee’s The Tightrope Walker. Klee’s painting is brought into connection with Nietzsche’s famous figure of the Seiltänzer in the prologue to Thus Spoke Zarathustra and to the recent film, Man on Wire. The general context of the essay, “descensional reflection,” is inspired by Heidegger’s remark that thinking in our time is “on the descent” from metaphysics.
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  32.  5
    David Farrell Krell (1990). Of Memory, Reminiscence, and Writing: On the Verge. Indiana UP.
    "Krell creates a remarkable interplay of meanings, allusions, and connotations—an interplay of multiple resonance which is finely tuned to Derrida's thought and which makes his essay as artful as it is conceptually disciplined.
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  33.  14
    David Farrell Krell (2007). “A Double Tale I Shall Tell . . . ”. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):287-304.
    Countless poets and thinkers over the ages have identified closely with Empedocles of Acragas. Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843) is one of these. The threeversions of his mourning-play, The Death of Empedocles, give us an opportunity to conceive of the unity of the Empedoclean project—to confront nature and humanexistence alike as tragic. Central to this tragic view of both On Nature and Purifications, reputedly the two books of Empedocles, is the theme of doubling and duplicity, especially the presence in the (one) sphere (...)
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  34.  7
    David Farrell Krell (1974). M. Merleau-Ponty on Eros and Logos. Man and World 7 (1):37-51.
  35.  6
    David Farrell Krell (2010). Response to My “Scholar's Session,” Spep 2009. Philosophy Today 54 (Supplement):38-50.
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  36.  21
    David Krell & Edward S. Casey (1992). Once More Into the Verge. Research in Phenomenology 22 (1):186-199.
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  37.  6
    David Farrell Krell (1976). Heidegger Nietzsche Hegel an Essay in Descensional Reflection. Nietzsche-Studien 5 (1):255.
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  38.  3
    David Farrell Krell (1987). Daimon Life, Nearness and Abyss: An Introduction to Za-Ology. Research in Phenomenology 17 (1):23-53.
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  39.  14
    David Farrell Krell (2010). Review Articles. Research in Phenomenology 40 (1):141-149.
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  40. Martin Heidegger & David Farrell Krell (1979). Nietzsche, Volume Iv Nihilism.
     
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  41.  2
    David Farrell Krell (1985). A Hermeneutics of Discretion. Research in Phenomenology 15 (1):1-27.
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  42.  2
    David Krell (1971). The Heraclitus Seminar: Review of "Heraclit" by Martin Heidegger and Eugen Fink. [REVIEW] Research in Phenomenology 1:137.
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  43.  1
    David Farrell Krell (1997). Archeticture: Ecstasies of Space, Time, and the Human Body. State University of New York Press.
    Calls for rethinking architecture as a way of renegotiating our encounter with the world, taking into account the role of love and desire in all human making.
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  44.  10
    David Farrell Krell (2008). The Death of Empedocles. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):289-311.
    The definitive scholarly edition and new translation of all three versions of Hölderlin’s poem, The Death of Empedocles, and his related theoretical essays.
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  45.  16
    Friedrich Hölderlin & David Farrell Krell (2008). The Death of Empedocles. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):289-311.
    The definitive scholarly edition and new translation of all three versions of Hölderlin’s poem, The Death of Empedocles, and his related theoretical essays.
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  46. David Farrell Krell (1996). Infectious Nietzsche. Indiana University Press.
    "Infectious Nietzsche is simply one of the most interesting and engaging works to appear on Nietzsche’s philosophy in years." —David Allison Krell explores health, illness, and creativity in the life and thought of Friedrich Nietzsche. Drawing on a varied literature of philosophical reflections on health, and analyzing Nietzsche’s confrontation with traditional values, Krell skillfully engages the legacy of Platonism and Western metaphysics that is at the core of Nietzsche’s thought. Nietzsche’s genealogical critique, his doctrine of eternal recurrence of the same, (...)
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  47.  10
    David Farrell Krell (1975). Nietzsche in Heidegger'skehre. Southern Journal of Philosophy 13 (2):197-204.
  48.  3
    David Farrell Krell (1977). Schlag der Liebe, Schlag Des toDes on a Theme in Heidegger and Trakl. Research in Phenomenology 7 (1):238-258.
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  49. David Farrell Krell (ed.) (1993). Basic Writings: Martin Heidegger. Routledge.
    First published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  50. David Farrell Krell (1987). Paradoxes of the Pineal: From Descartes to Georges Bataille: David Farrell Krell. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 21:215-228.
    Behind the third ventricle of the human brain a miniscule pedunculate bud, close to the optic thalamus, that is, to the two beds of optic nerves, a gland soft in substance yet containing gritty particles. Function: unknown. Because of its pine-cone shape it is called the conarium or pineal body , even though the recent photographs of it by Nilsson and Lindberg show it to be morphologically reminiscent of nothing so much as the plucked tail of a gamebird, which Simon (...)
     
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