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David L. Hull [109]David Lee Hull [1]
  1. David L. Hull (1988). Science as a Process an Evolutionary Account of the Social and Conceptual Development of Science. University of Chicago Press.
  2.  67
    David L. Hull (1978). A Matter of Individuality. Philosophy of Science 45 (3):335-360.
    Biological species have been treated traditionally as spatiotemporally unrestricted classes. If they are to perform the function which they do in the evolutionary process, they must be spatiotemporally localized individuals, historical entities. Reinterpreting biological species as historical entities solves several important anomalies in biology, in philosophy of biology, and within philosophy itself. It also has important implications for any attempt to present an "evolutionary" analysis of science and for sciences such as anthropology which are devoted to the study of single (...)
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  3. David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.) (1998). The Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press.
    Drawing on work of the past decade, this volume brings together articles from the philosophy, history, and sociology of science, and many other branches of the biological sciences. The volume delves into the latest theoretical controversies as well as burning questions of contemporary social importance. The issues considered include the nature of evolutionary theory, biology and ethics, the challenge from religion, and the social implications of biology today (in particular the Human Genome Project).
     
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  4. David L. Hull (1974). Philosophy of Biological Science. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
  5.  33
    David L. Hull (2001). Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Hull aims to distinguish between those characteristics that are contingent features of selection and those that are essential. Science and Selection brings together (...)
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  6.  43
    David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). A General Account of Selection: Biology, Immunology, and Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):511-528.
    Authors frequently refer to gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning as exemplifying selection processes in the same sense of this term. However, as obvious as this claim may seem on the surface, setting out an account of “selection” that is general enough to incorporate all three of these processes without becoming so general as to be vacuous is far from easy. In this target article, we set out such a general (...)
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  7.  5
    David L. Hull (1989). The Metaphysics of Evolution. State University of New York Press.
    Extreme variation in the meaning of the term “species” throughout the history of biology has often frustrated attempts of historians, philosophers and biologists to communicate with one another about the transition in biological thinking from the static species concept to the modern notion of evolving species. The most important change which has underlain all the other fluctuations in the meaning of the word “species” is the change from it denoting such metaphysical entities as essences, Forms or Natures to denoting classes (...)
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  8. Kim Sterelny, Paul E. Griffiths, David L. Hull, Michael Ruse & Jane Maienschein (2000). Sex and Death: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Biology. Journal of the History of Biology 33 (1):181-187.
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  9.  1
    David L. Hull (1980). Individuality and Selection. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 11:311-332.
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  10.  32
    David L. Hull (1988). A Mechanism and its Metaphysics: An Evolutionary Account of the Social and Conceptual Development of Science. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):123-155.
    The claim that conceptual systems change is a platitude. That our conceptual systems are theory-laden is no less platitudinous. Given evolutionary theory, biologists are led to divide up the living world into genes, organisms, species, etc. in a particular way. No theory-neutral individuation of individuals or partitioning of these individuals into natural kinds is possible. Parallel observations should hold for philosophical theories about scientific theories. In this paper I summarize a theory of scientific change which I set out (...)
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  11. David L. Hull (1981). Units of Evolution: A Metaphysical Essay. In Uffe Juul Jensen & Rom Harré (eds.), The Philosophy of Evolution. St. Martin's Press 23--44.
     
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  12.  56
    David L. Hull (1973/1983). Darwin and His Critics: The Reception of Darwin's Theory of Evolution by the Scientific Community. University of Chicago Press.
  13.  9
    David L. Hull (1988). A Period of Development: A Response. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 3 (2):241-263.
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  14. David L. Hull (1965). The Effect of Essentialism on Taxonomy--Two Thousand Years of Stasis (I). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 15 (60):314-326.
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  15.  98
    David L. Hull (1965). The Effect of Essentialism on Taxonomy--Two Thousand Years of Stasis (II). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (61):1-18.
  16.  6
    David L. Hull (1987). Genealogical Actors in Ecological Roles. Biology and Philosophy 2 (2):168.
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  17.  26
    David L. Hull & Michael Ruse (eds.) (2007). The Cambridge Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Cambridge University Press.
    The philosophy of biology is one of the most exciting new areas in the field of philosophy and one that is attracting much attention from working scientists. This Companion, edited by two of the founders of the field, includes newly commissioned essays by senior scholars and up-and-coming younger scholars who collectively examine the main areas of the subject - the nature of evolutionary theory, classification, teleology and function, ecology, and the problematic relationship between biology and religion, among other topics. Up-to-date (...)
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  18. David L. Hull (2001). The Success of Science and Social Norms. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 23 (3/4):341 - 360.
    In this paper I characterize science in terms of both invisible hand social organization and selection. These two processes are responsible for different features of science. Individuals working in isolation cannot produce much in the way of the warranted knowledge. Individual biases severely limit how much secure knowledge an individual can generate on his or her own. Individuals working in consort are required, but social groups can be organized in many different ways. The key feature of the social organization in (...)
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  19.  17
    David L. Hull (2003). Darwin's Science and Victorian Philosophy of Science. In J. Hodges & Gregory Radick (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Darwin. Cambridge University Press 168--191.
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  20.  23
    David L. Hull, Rodney E. Langman & Sigrid S. Glenn (2001). At Last: Serious Consideration. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):559-569.
    For a long time, several natural phenomena have been considered unproblematically selection processes in the same sense of “selection.” In our target article we dealt with three of these phenomena: gene-based selection in biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, and operant learning. We characterize selection in terms of three processes (variation, replication, and environmental interaction) resulting in the evolution of lineages via differential replication. Our commentators were largely supportive with respect to variation and environmental interaction but (...)
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  21.  86
    David L. Hull (1999). The Use and Abuse of Sir Karl Popper. Biology and Philosophy 14 (4):481-504.
    Karl Popper has been one of the few philosophers of sciences who has influenced scientists. I evaluate Popper's influence on our understanding of evolutionary theory from his earliest publications to the present. Popper concluded that three sorts of statements in evolutionary biology are not genuine laws of nature. I take him to be right on this score. Popper's later distinction between evolutionary theory as a metaphysical research program and as a scientific theory led more than one scientist to misunderstand his (...)
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  22. David L. Hull (1972). Reduction in Genetics--Biology or Philosophy? Philosophy of Science 39 (4):491-499.
    A belief common among philosophers and biologists alike is that Mendelian genetics has been or is in the process of being reduced to molecular genetics, in the sense of formal theory reduction current in the literature. The purpose of this paper is to show that there are numerous empirical and conceptual difficulties which stand in the way of establishing a systematic inferential relation between Mendelian and molecular genetics. These difficulties, however, have little to do with the traditional objections which have (...)
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  23.  94
    David L. Hull (1997). What's Wrong with Invisible-Hand Explanations? Philosophy of Science 64 (4):126.
    An invisible hand seems to play an important role in science. In this paper I set out the general structure of invisible-hand explanations, counter some objections that have been raised to them, and detail the role that they play in science. The most important issue is the character of the mechanisms that are supposed to bring about invisible-hand effects.
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  24. David L. Hull (1974). Are the 'Members' of Biological Species 'Similar' to Each Other? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 25 (4):332-334.
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  25.  73
    David L. Hull (1980). On Human Nature. Environmental Ethics 2 (1):81-88.
    If species are the things that evolve at least in large part through the action of natural selection, then both genetic and phenotypic variability are essential to biological species. If all species are variable, then Homo sapiens must be variable. Hence, it is very unlikely that the human species as a biological species can be characterized by a set of invariable traits. It might be the case that at this moment in evolutionary history, all human beings happen to possess a (...)
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  26.  22
    David L. Hull (2006). The Essence of Scientific Theories. Biological Theory 1 (1):17-19.
  27.  11
    David L. Hull (2000). The Professionalization of Science Studies: Cutting Some Slack. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (1):61-91.
    During the past hundred years or so, those scholars studying science have isolated themselves as much as possible from scientists as well as from workers in other disciplines who study science. The result of this effort is history of science, philosophy of science and sociology of science as separate disciplines. I argue in this paper that now is the time for these disciplinary boundaries to be lowered or at least made more permeable so that a unified discipline of Science Studies (...)
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  28.  28
    David L. Hull (2005). Deconstructing Darwin: Evolutionary Theory in Context. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):137 - 152.
    The topic of this paper is external versus internal explanations, first, of the genesis of evolutionary theory and, second, its reception. Victorian England was highly competitive and individualistic. So was the view of society promulgated by Malthus and the theory of evolution set out by Charles Darwin and A.R. Wallace. The fact that Darwin and Wallace independently produced a theory of evolution that was just as competitive and individualistic as the society in which they lived is taken as evidence for (...)
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  29.  31
    David L. Hull (1994). Ernst Mayr's Influence on the History and Philosophy of Biology: A Personal Memoir. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (3):375-386.
    Mayr has made both conceptual and professional contributions to the establishment of the history and philosophy of biology. His conceptual contributions include, among many others, the notion of population thinking. He has also played an important role in the establishment of history and philosophy of biology as viable professional disciplines.
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  30.  26
    David L. Hull (1969). What Philosophy of Biology is Not. Synthese 20 (2):157 - 184.
  31.  4
    David L. Hull (1979). Laudan's Progress and Its Problems. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (4):457.
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  32.  82
    David L. Hull, Andrew Lugg, Robert E. Butts & I. C. Jarvie (1979). Review Symposium : Laurens Laudan. Progress and its Problems: Toward a Theory of Scientific Growth. Berkeley and Los Angeles: The University of California Press, 1977. Pp. X + 257.Laudan's Progress and its Problems. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 9 (4):457-465.
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  33.  3
    Cecilia Heyes & David L. Hull (eds.) (2001). Selection Theory and Social Construction: The Evolutionary Naturalistic Epistemology of Donald T. Campbell. State University of New York Press.
    Top scholars examine the work of Donald T. Campbell, one of the first to emphasize the social structure of science.
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  34.  4
    David L. Hull (1981). Kitts and Kitts and Caplan on Species. Philosophy of Science 48 (1):141-152.
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  35. David L. Hull (2008). The History of the Philosophy of Biology. In Michael Ruse (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Biology. Oxford University Press 11--33.
     
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  36.  30
    David L. Hull (2002). Recent Philosophy of Biology: A Review. Acta Biotheoretica 50 (2):117-128.
    Academia is subdivided into separate disciplines, most of which are quite discrete. In this review I trace the interactions between two of these disciplines: biology and philosophy of biology. I concentrate on those topics that have the most extensive biological content: function, species, systematics, selection, reduction and development. In the final section of this paper I touch briefly on those issues that biologists and philosophers have addressed that do not have much in the way of biological content.
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  37. David L. Hull & Paul Griffiths (1994). Trees of Life: Essays in Philosophy of Biology. Biology and Philosophy 9 (1):105-112.
     
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  38.  6
    David L. Hull (2002). The Social Responsibility of Professional Societies. Metaphilosophy 33 (5):552-565.
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  39. David L. Hull (1997). That Just Don't Sound Right: A Plea for Real Examples'. In John Earman & John Norton (eds.), The Cosmos of Science. University of Pittsburgh Press
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  40.  4
    David L. Hull (2000). Why Did Darwin Fail? The Role of John Stuart Mill. In Richard Creath & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Biology and Epistemology. Cambridge University Press 48.
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  41.  5
    David L. Hull (2001). The Role of Theories in Biological Systematics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (2):221-238.
    The role of scientific theories in classifying plants and animals is traced from Hennig's phylogenetics and the evolutionary taxonomy of Simpson and Mayr, through numerical phenetics, to present-day cladistics. Hennig limited biological classification to sister groups so that this one relation can be expressed unambiguously in classifications. Simpson and Mayr were willing to sacrifice precision in representation in order to include additional features of evolution in the construction of classifications. In order to make classifications more objective, precise and quantitative, numerical (...)
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  42.  20
    David L. Hull (1982). Exemplars and Scientific Change. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:479 - 503.
    Philosophers have distinguished a metaphysical category which they term "historical entities" or "continuants". Such particulars are spatiotemporally localized and develop continuously through time while retaining internal cohesiveness. Species, social groups and conceptual systems can be profitably treated as historical entities. No damage is done to preanalytic intuitions in treating social groups as historical entities; both biological species and conceptual systems can be construed as historical entities only by modifying the ordinary way of viewing both. However, if species and conceptual systems (...)
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  43.  2
    Roger C. Buck & David L. Hull (1966). The Logical Structure of the Linnaen Hierarchy. Systematic Zoology 15 (2):97-111.
  44.  17
    David L. Hull (1981). Reduction and Genetics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 6 (2):125-144.
    Examples of reduction outside of physics typically concern in principle possibilities; e.g., if we had a decent psychological theory of human behavior, we could reduce it to neurophysiology once we know more. However, in one instance, a reduction is actually well underway – the reduction of Mendelian genetics to molecular biology. Empirical and conceptual difficulties in setting out this reduction have led certain philosophers to modify the traditional logical empiricist analysis of theory reduction, first, to allow for necessary corrections and, (...)
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  45.  2
    David L. Hull (1974). Informal Aspects of Theory Reduction. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1974:653 - 670.
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  46.  17
    David L. Hull (1979). Reduction in Genetics. Philosophy of Science 46 (2):316-320.
  47. David L. Hull (2000). Science and Selection: Essays on Biological Evolution and the Philosophy of Science. Cambridge University Press.
    One way to understand science is as a selection process. David Hull, one of the dominant figures in contemporary philosophy of science, sets out in this 2001 volume a general analysis of this selection process that applies equally to biological evolution, the reaction of the immune system to antigens, operant learning, and social and conceptual change in science. Hull aims to distinguish between those characteristics that are contingent features of selection and those that are essential. Science (...)
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  48.  7
    David L. Hull (1977). IV. Teaching Philosophy of Science at a State University. Teaching Philosophy 2 (2):119-121.
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  49.  18
    David L. Hull (1998). A Clash of Paradigms or the Sound of One Hand Clapping. Biology and Philosophy 13 (4):587-595.
  50.  2
    David L. Hull (1981). Metaphysics and Common Usage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 4 (2):290.
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