8 found
Sort by:
  1. David Peter Lawrence (2014). The Linguistics and Cosmology of Agency in Nondual Kashmiri Śaiva Thought. In Matthew R. Dasti & Edwin F. Bryant (eds.), Free Will, Agency, and Selfhood in Indian Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David Peter Lawrence (2009). Proof of a Sentient Knower: Utpaladeva's Ajaḍapramātṛsiddhi with the Vṛtti of Harabhatta Shastri. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (6):627-653.
    Utpaladeva (c. 900–950 C.E.) was the chief originator of the Pratyabhijñā philosophical theology of monistic Kashmiri Śaivism, which was further developed by Abhinavagupta (c. 950–1020 C.E.) and other successors. The Ajaḍapramātṛsiddhi, “Proof of a Sentient Knower,” is one component of Utpaladeva’s trio of specialized studies called the Siddhitrayī, “Three Proofs.” This article provides an introduction to and translation of the Ajaḍapramātṛsiddhi along with the Vṛtti commentary on it by the nineteenth–twentieth century paṇḍit, Harabhatta Shastri. Utpaladeva in this work presents “transcendental” (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David Peter Lawrence, Kashmiri Shaiva Philosophy. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. David Peter Lawrence (2005). Remarks on Abhinavagupta's Use of the Analogy of Reflection. Journal of Indian Philosophy 33 (5):583-599.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David Lawrence (1998). Śiva's Self-Recognition and the Problem of Interpretation. Philosophy East and West 48 (2):197-231.
    Aspects of the Pratyabhijñā philosophical theology for monistic Śaivism of the ninth- and tenth-century Kashmiri thinkers Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta are interpreted in relation to their relevance and pre-sumptiveness to contemporary Western thought. It is claimed that the Pratyabhijñā system elucidates important features of our past and present deliberations about the role of interpretation in experience and provides us with a sound way of arguing for the reality of God.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David Lawrence (1998). The Mythico-Ritual Syntax of Omnipotence. Philosophy East and West 48 (4):592-622.
    The use of theories of Sanskrit syntax by Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta to explain the action of monistic Śaiva myth and ritual is examined. These thinkers develop a distinctive approach to syntax that reductionistically emphasizes the role of the true Self/Śiva as omnipotent agent, in opposition to the denigration of agency by the majority of Hindu as well as Buddhist philosophies. An analogy to the Indian discussions is seen in the typological effort of Kenneth Burke's "Grammar of Motives," and it is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David Lawrence (1996). Tantric Argument: The Transfiguration of Philosophical Discourse in the Pratyabhijñā System of Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta. Philosophy East and West 46 (2):165-204.
    The purposes and methods of medieval Kashmiri thinkers Utpaladeva and Abhinavagupta in creating the Pratyabhijñā philosophical apologetics for monistic Śaivism are examined. These thinkers structure their philosophy with the argumentative standards of Nyāya in the pursuit of universal intelligibility, while at the same time homologizing their discourse to tantric myth and ritual. How the Śaivas implement their project with their theory of recognition is also summarized.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David M. Lawrence & William P. Banks (1973). Accuracy of Recognition Memory for Common Sounds. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 1 (5):298-300.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation