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  1. David Lewis, Modal Realism.
    When I profess realism about possible worlds, I mean to be taken literally. Possible worlds are what they are, and not some other thing. If asked what sort of thing they are, I cannot give the kind of reply my questioner probably expects: that is, a proposal to reduce possible worlds to something else. I can only ask him to admit that he knows what sort of thing our actual world is, and then explain that possible worlds are more things (...)
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  2. Trevor Bench-Capon, Michał Araszkiewicz, Kevin Ashley, Katie Atkinson, Floris Bex, Filipe Borges, Daniele Bourcier, Paul Bourgine, Jack G. Conrad, Enrico Francesconi, Thomas F. Gordon, Guido Governatori, Jochen L. Leidner, David D. Lewis, Ronald P. Loui, L. Thorne McCarty, Henry Prakken, Frank Schilder, Erich Schweighofer, Paul Thompson, Alex Tyrrell, Bart Verheij, Douglas N. Walton & Adam Z. Wyner (2012). A History of AI and Law in 50 Papers: 25 Years of the International Conference on AI and Law. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 20 (3):215-319.
    We provide a retrospective of 25 years of the International Conference on AI and Law, which was first held in 1987. Fifty papers have been selected from the thirteen conferences and each of them is described in a short subsection individually written by one of the 24 authors. These subsections attempt to place the paper discussed in the context of the development of AI and Law, while often offering some personal reactions and reflections. As a whole, the subsections build into (...)
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  3. Wim Vandekerckhove & David Lewis (2012). The Content of Whistleblowing Procedures: A Critical Review of Recent Official Guidelines. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (2):253-264.
    There is an increasing recognition of the need to provide ways for people to raise concerns about suspected wrongdoing by promoting internal policies and procedures which offer proper safeguards to actual and potential whistleblowers. Many organisations in both the public and private sectors now have such measures and these display a wide variety of operating modalities: in-house or outsourced, anonymous/confidential/identified, multi or single tiered, specified or open subject matter, etc. As a result of this development, a number of guidelines and (...)
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  4. David Lewis (2011). David Bowsher, Tony Dyson, Nick Holder, and Isca Howell, The London Guildhall: An Archaeological History of a Neighbourhood From Early Medieval to Modern Times. 2 Vols.(MoLAS Monograph 36.) London: Museum of London Archaeology Service, 2007. 1: Pp. Xxvi, 1–296; 280 Black-and-White and Color Figures (Some Foldout) and 2 Tables. 2: Pp. Iii, 297–536 Plus CD-ROM; Many Black-and-White and Color Figures (Some Foldout) and Tables.£ 65. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (1):166-168.
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  5. David Lewis (2011). Whistleblowing in a Changing Legal Climate: Is It Time to Revisit Our Approach to Trust and Loyalty at the Workplace? Business Ethics 20 (1):71-87.
    This article suggests that the introduction of employment protection rights for whistleblowers has implications for the way in which trust and loyalty should be viewed at the workplace. In particular, it is argued that the very existence of legislative provisions in the United Kingdom reinforces the notion that whistleblowing should not be regarded as either deviant or disloyal behaviour. Thus, the internal reporting of concerns can be seen as an act of trust and loyalty in drawing the employer's attention to (...)
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  6. David Lewis (2010). Why Conditionalize. In Antony Eagle (ed.), Philosophy of Probability: Contemporary Readings. Routledge. 403-407.
  7. David D. Lewis (2010). Afterword: Data, Knowledge, and E-Discovery. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):481-486.
    Research in Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the Law has maintained an emphasis on knowledge representation and formal reasoning during a period when statistical, data-driven approaches have ascended to dominance within AI as a whole. Electronic discovery is a legal application area, with substantial commercial and research interest, where there are compelling arguments in favor of both empirical and knowledge-based approaches. We discuss the cases for both perspectives, as well as the opportunities for beneficial synergies.
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  8. Douglas W. Oard, Jason R. Baron, Bruce Hedin, David D. Lewis & Stephen Tomlinson (2010). Evaluation of Information Retrieval for E-Discovery. Artificial Intelligence and Law 18 (4):347-386.
    The effectiveness of information retrieval technology in electronic discovery (E-discovery) has become the subject of judicial rulings and practitioner controversy. The scale and nature of E-discovery tasks, however, has pushed traditional information retrieval evaluation approaches to their limits. This paper reviews the legal and operational context of E-discovery and the approaches to evaluating search technology that have evolved in the research community. It then describes a multi-year effort carried out as part of the Text Retrieval Conference to develop evaluation methods (...)
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  9. David Lewis (2009). A Philosopher's Paradise. In Michael C. Rea (ed.), Arguing About Metaphysics. Routledge. 483.
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  10. David Lewis (2009). Ramseyan Humility. In David Braddon-Mitchell & Robert Nola (eds.), Conceptual Analysis and Philosophical Naturalism. Mit Press. 203-222.
  11. David Lewis (2008). Ten Years of Public Interest Disclosure Legislation in the UK: Are Whistleblowers Adequately Protected? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):497 - 507.
    Purpose The purpose of this article is to assess the operation of the UK’s Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 (PIDA 1998) during its first 10 years and to consider its implications for the whistleblowing process. Method The article sets the legislation into context by discussing the common law background. It then gives detailed consideration to the statutory provisions and how they have been interpreted by the courts and tribunals. Results In assessing the impact of the legislation’s approach to whistleblowing both (...)
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  12. J. L. Austin, Anthony Brueckner, Noam Chomsky, Donald Davidson, Keith Donnellan, Michael Dummett, Gareth Evans, Gottlob Frege, H. P. Grice, Paul Horwich, David Kaplan, Saul Kripke, David Lewis, John McDowell, Michael McKinsey, Ruth Millikan, Stephen Neale, Hilary Putnam, W. V. Quine, Bertrand Russell, Nathan Salmon, Stephen Schiffer, John Searle, P. F. Strawson, Alfred Tarski & Ludwig Wittgenstein (2007). Philosophy of Language: The Central Topics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  13. David Lewis (2007). Divine Evil. In Louise Anthony (ed.), Philosophers Without Gods. Oxford University Press. 231-242.
     
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  14. David Lewis (2006). Knowing What It's Like. In Maureen Eckert (ed.), Theories of Mind: An Introductory Reader. Rowman and Littlefield. 211.
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  15. David Lewis (2005). Quasi-Realism is Fictionalism. In Mark Eli Kalderon (ed.), Fictionalism in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 314-321.
  16. Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & David Lewis (2004). How Many Lives Has Schrodinger's Cat? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):3-22.
  17. David Lewis (2004). How Many Lives Has Schrodinger's Cat? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):3-22.
  18. David Lewis (2004). Canberra, 27 June 2001. In Frank Jackson & Graham Priest (eds.), Lewisian Themes: The Philosophy of David K. Lewis. Oxford University Press. 4.
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  19. David Lewis (2004). Letters to Priest and Beall. In The Law of Non-Contradiction. Oxford University Press. 176-177.
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  20. David Lewis (2004). Selection From New Work for a Theory of Universals. In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
     
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  21. David Lewis (2004). Selection From On the Plurality of Worlds. In Tim Crane & Katalin Farkas (eds.), Metaphysics: A Guide and Anthology. Oup Oxford.
     
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  22. David Lewis (2004). The Law of Non-Contradiction. Oxford University Press.
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  23. David Lewis (2004). Tensed Quantifiers. In Dean Zimmerman (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press. 3-14.
  24. David Lewis (2004). Void and Object. In John Collins, Ned Hall & L. A. Paul (eds.), Causation and Counterfactuals. Mit Press. 277-290.
    The void is deadly. If you were cast into a void, it would cause you to die in just a few minutes. It would suck the air from your lungs. It would boil your blood. It would drain the warmth from your body. And it would inflate enclosures in your body until they burst}.
     
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  25. David Lewis (2003). Contextualist Response. In Steven Luper (ed.), Essential Knowledge: Readings in Epistemology. Longman. 270.
     
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  26. David Lewis (2003). Rights to Rights. Theoria 69 (3):160-165.
  27. David Lewis (2003). Things Qua Truthmakers. In Hallvard Lillehammer & Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (eds.), Real Metaphysics: Essays in honor of D. H. Mellor. Routledge. 25-38.
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  28. David Lewis & Gideon Rosen (2003). Postscript to ”Things Qua Truthmakers': Negative Existentials. In Hallvard Lillehammer & Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (eds.), Real Metaphysics: Essays in Honour of D. H. Mellor. Routledge. 39-42.
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  29. David Lewis (2002). Tensing the Copula. Mind 111 (441):1-14.
    A solution to the problem of intrinsic change for enduring things should meet three conditions. It should not replace monadic intrinsic properties by relations. It should not replace the having simpliciter of properties by standing in some relation to them . It should not rely on an unexplained notion of having an intrinsic property at a time. Johnston's solution satisfies the first condition at the expense of the second. Haslanger's solution satisfies the first and second at the expense of the (...)
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  30. David Lewis (2002). Tharp’s Third Theorem. Analysis 62 (274):95–97.
  31. David Lewis (2002). Whistleblowing Procedures at Work: What Are the Implications for Human Resource Practitioners? Business Ethics 11 (3):202–209.
    This paper explains why it is desirable for employers to have whistleblowing codes, and draws upon professional guidelines and empirical research to suggest the possible contents of whistleblowing policies and procedures. The paper discusses who and what should be covered and examines the issues of confidentiality and anonymity, reprisals and malicious allegations. It also highlights the need to provide advice and assistance to those who have concerns about wrongdoing at work. The author outlines the possible stages in a whistleblowing procedure, (...)
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  32. David Lewis & Rae Langton (2002). Comment définir « intrinsèque ». Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 4 (4):511-527.
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  33. Rae Langton & David Lewis (2001). Marshall and Parsons on 'Intrinsic'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):353-355.
    Dan Marshall and Josh Parsons note, correctly. that the property of being either a cube or accompanied by a cube is incorrectly classified as intrinsic under the definition we have given unless it turns out to be disjunctive. Whether it is disjunctive, under the definition we gave, turns on certain judgements of the relative naturalness of properties. They doubt the judgements of relative naturalness that would classify their property as disjunctive. We disagree. They also suggest that the whole idea of (...)
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  34. David Lewis (2001). Forget About the ‘Correspondence Theory of Truth’. Analysis 61 (272):275–280.
    There is no distinct correspondence theory of truth, truth is correspondence to fact. If facts are taken to be true propositions, we wind up with just another version of the correspondence theory's ostensible competitor, the redundancy theory of truth. If instead facts are taken to be Armstrong's states of affairs, or Tractarian facts, or Mellor's _facta, we get a _truthmaker principle, that for every truth there is a truthmaker; something whose existence implies the proposition in question. Truthmaker principles are interesting (...)
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  35. David Lewis (2001). Redefining 'Intrinsic'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):381-398.
    Several alleged counterexamples to the definition of ‘intrinsic’ proposed in Rae Langton and David Lewis, ‘Defining “Intrinsic”’, are unconvincing. Yet there are reasons for dissatisfaction, and room for improvement. One desirable change is to raise the standard of non-disjunctiveness, thereby putting less burden on contentious judgements of comparative naturalness. A second is to deal with spurious independence by throwing out just the disjunctive troublemakers, instead of throwing out disjunctive properties wholesale, and afterward reinstating those impeccably intrinsic disjunctive properties that are (...)
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  36. David Lewis (2001). Sleeping Beauty: Reply to Elga. Analysis 61 (3):171–76.
  37. David Lewis (2001). Truthmaking and Difference-Making. Noûs 35 (4):602–615.
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  38. David K. Lewis & Rae Langton (2001). Marshall and Parsons On. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (2):353-356.
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  39. David Lewis (2000). Causation as Influence. Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):182-197.
  40. David K. Lewis (2000). Papers in Ethics and Social Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is devoted to Lewis's work in ethics and social philosophy. Topics covered include the logic of obligation and permission; decision theory and its relation to the idea that beliefs might play the motivating role of desires; a subjectivist analysis of value; dilemmas in virtue ethics; the problem of evil; problems about self-prediction; social coordination, linguistic and otherwise; alleged duties to rescue distant strangers; toleration as a tacit treaty; nuclear warfare; and punishment. This collection, and the two preceding volumes, (...)
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  41. David Lewis, Great Britain & Social Development Systems for Coordinated Poverty Eradication (2000). Promoting Socially Responsible Business, Ethical Trade and Acceptable Labour Standards. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  42. David Lewis (1999). Zimmerman and the Spinning Sphere. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (2):209 – 212.
  43. David K. Lewis (1999). Papers in Metaphysics and Epistemology. Cambridge, Uk ;Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is devoted to Lewis's work in metaphysics and epistemology. Topics covered include properties, ontology, possibility, truthmaking, probability, the mind-body problem, vision, belief, and knowledge. The purpose of this collection, and the volumes that precede and follow it, is to disseminate more widely the work of an eminent and influential contemporary philosopher. The volume will serve as a useful work of reference for teachers and students of philosophy.
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  44. Rae Langton & David Lewis (1998). Defining 'Intrinsic'. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 58 (2):333-345.
    Something could be round even if it were the only thing in the universe, unaccompanied by anything distinct from itself. Jaegwon Kim once suggested that we define an intrinsic property as one that can belong to something unaccompanied. Wrong: unaccompaniment itself is not intrinsic, yet it can belong to something unaccompanied. But there is a better Kim-style definition. Say that P is independent of accompaniment iff four different cases are possible: something accompanied may have P or lack P, something unaccompanied (...)
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  45. David Lewis (1998). A World of Truthmakers? Times Literary Supplement 4950 (4950):30-33.
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  46. David K. Lewis (1998). Papers in Philosophical Logic. Cambridge University Press.
    This is the first of a three-volume collection of David Lewis's most recent papers in all the areas to which he has made significant contributions. The purpose of this collection (and the two volumes to follow) is to disseminate even more widely the work of a preeminent and influential late twentieth-century philosopher. The papers are now offered in a readily accessible format. This first volume is devoted to Lewis's work on philosophical logic from the last twenty-five years. The topics covered (...)
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  47. David Lewis (1997). Do We Believe in Penal Substitution? Philosophical Papers 26 (3):203 - 209.
    If a guilty offender is justly sentenced to be punished and an innocent volunteer agrees to be punished instead, is that any reason to leave the offender unpunished? In the context of mundane criminal justice, we mostly think not. But in a religious context, some Christians do believe in penal substitution as a theory of the atonement. However, it is not just these Christians, but most of us, who are of two minds. If the punishment is an imprisonment or death, (...)
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  48. David Lewis (1997). Counterparts or Double Lives?(Selections). In Michael C. Rea (ed.), Material Constitution. Rowman & Littlefield. 126.
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  49. David Lewis (1997). Finkish Dispositions. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (187):143-158.
    Many years ago, C.B. Martin drew our attention to the possibility of ‘finkish’ dispositions: dispositions which, if put to the test would not be manifested, but rather would disappear. Thus if x if finkishly disposed to give response r to stimulus s, it is not so that if x were subjected to stimulus r, x would give response z; so finkish dispositions afford a counter‐example to the simplest conditional analysis of dispositions. Martin went on to suggest that finkish dispositions required (...)
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  50. David Lewis (1997). Modal Realism at Work. In D. H. Mellor & Alex Oliver (eds.), Properties. Oup Oxford.
     
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