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David Loy [32]David R. Loy [22]
  1. David Loy (forthcoming). Frederick J. Streng Book Award. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  2. David Loy (forthcoming). The Dharma of Emanuel Swedenborg: A Buddhist Perspective. Buddhist-Christian Studies.
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  3. David Loy (2012). Review of Leesa S. Davis, Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism: Deconstructive Modes of Spiritual Inquiry. [REVIEW] Sophia 51 (2):323-325.
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  4. David Loy (2008). Awareness Bound and Unbound: Realizing the Nature of Attention. Philosophy East and West 58 (2):223-243.
    : This essay takes seriously the many Buddhist admonitions about ‘‘not settling down in things’’ and the importance of wandering freely ‘‘without a place to rest.’’ The basic thesis is that delusion (samsāra, ignorance) is awareness trapped (stuck), and liberation (nirvāna, enlightenment) is awareness freed from grasping. The familiar words ‘‘attention’’ and ‘‘awareness’’ are used to emphasize that the distinction being drawn refers not to some abstract metaphysical entity but simply to how our everyday awareness functions. This way of distinguishing (...)
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  5. Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, David Loy, James F. Keenan, Kathleen Matthews, Terry Winograd & Laurie Zoloth (2007). The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 1). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):229-239.
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  6. Courtney S. Campbell, Lauren A. Clark, David Loy, James F. Keenan, Kathleen Matthews, Terry Winograd & Laurie Zoloth (2007). The Bodily Incorporation of Mechanical Devices: Ethical and Religious Issues (Part 2). Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (03):268-280.
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  7. David Loy (2007). Buddhism in the Public Sphere: Reorienting Global Interdependence (Review). Philosophy East and West 58 (1):144-147.
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  8. David Loy (2007). Cyberbabel? Ethics and Information Technology 9 (4):251-258.
    The new information technologies hold out the promise of instantaneous, 24/7 connection and co-presence. But to be everywhere at once is to be effectively nowhere; to be connected to everyone and everything is to be effectively disconnected. Why then do we long for faster connections and fuller connectivity? The answer this paper proposes is that we are trying to fill our existential lack, our radical sense of inadequacy and incompleteness as human beings. From such a perspective, our pursuit of speed (...)
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  9. Jane Augustine, Zong-qi Cai, Simon Glynn, Gad Horowitz, Roger Jackson, E. H. Jarow, Steven W. Laycock, David R. Loy, Ian Mabbett, Frank W. Stevenson, Youru Wang & Ellen Y. Zhang (2006). Buddhisms and Deconstructions. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  10. David R. Loy (2005). Psychoanalysis and Buddhism: An Unfolding Dialogue (Review). Philosophy East and West 55 (2):363-367.
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  11. David R. Loy (2005). Evil as the Good? A Reply to Brook Ziporyn. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):348-352.
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  12. David R. Loy (2004). Evil and/or/as The Good: Omnicentrism, Intersubjectivity, and Value Paradox in Tiantai Buddhist Thought (Review). Philosophy East and West 54 (1):99-103.
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  13. David R. Loy (2004). The Challenge of Global Capitalism: The Perspective of Eastern Religions. In John H. Dunning (ed.), Making Globalization Good: The Moral Challenges of Global Capitalism. Oup Oxford.
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  14. David Loy (2003). Buddhism and Christianity: A Multicultural History of Their Dialogue (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 23 (1):151-155.
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  15. David R. Loy (2003). Remaking the World, or Remaking Ourselves? Buddhist Reflections on Technology. In Peter D. Hershock, M. T. Stepani͡ant͡s & Roger T. Ames (eds.), Technology and Cultural Values: On the Edge of the Third Millennium. East-West Philosophers Conference. 176--87.
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  16. Stephen C. Angle, Michael Barnhart, Carl B. Becker, Purushottama Bilimoria, Samuel Fleischacker, Alan Fox, Damien Keown, Russell Kirkland, David R. Loy, Mara Miller & Kirill Ole Thompson (2002). Varieties of Ethical Reflection: New Directions for Ethics in a Global Context. Lexington Books.
    The work pushes ethics beyond a Western philosophical tradition tending toward universalism to infuse and broaden modern ethical theory with relativistic Asian ethical principles.
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  17. David R. Loy (2001). Buddhism and Poverty. Contemporary Buddhism 2 (1):55-71.
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  18. David R. Loy (2001). The Happiness Project: Transforming the Three Poisons That Cause the Suffering We Inflict on Ourselves and Others (Review). Buddhist-Christian Studies 21 (1):151-154.
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  19. David R. Loy & James Turner Johnson (2001). Letters, Notes & Comments. Journal of Religious Ethics 29 (3):503 - 511.
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  20. David Loy (2000). David Loy Interview. Buddhist-Christian Studies 20 (1):321-323.
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  21. David R. Loy (2000). Freedom. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (2):29-52.
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  22. David R. Loy (2000). Freedom: A Buddhist Critique. International Studies in Philosophy 32 (2):29-52.
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  23. David R. Loy (2000). Philosophical Meditations on Zen Buddhism, by Dale S. Wright. Asian Philosophy 10:80.
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  24. David R. Loy (2000). Practically Religious: Worldly Benefits and the Common Religion of Japan, by Ian Reader and George J. Tanabe, Jr. Asian Philosophy 10:176.
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  25. David R. Loy (2000). Saving Time: A Buddhist Perspective on the End. Contemporary Buddhism 1 (1):35-51.
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  26. David R. Loy (2000). The Spiritual Origins of the West. International Philosophical Quarterly 40 (2):215-233.
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  27. David R. Loy (1999). Elaborations on Emptiness: Uses of the Heart Sutra, by Donald S. Lopez, Jr. Philosophy East and West 49:520-524.
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  28. David R. Loy (1999). Language Against its Own Mystifications: Deconstruction in Nāgārjuna and Dōgen. Philosophy East and West 49 (3):245-260.
    Nāgārjuna and Dōgen point to many of the same Buddhist insights because they deconstruct the same type of dualities, mostly versions of our commonsense but delusive distinction between substance and attribute, subject and predicate. This is demonstrated by examining chapter 2 of the "Mūlamadhyamakakārikā" and Dōgen's transgression of traditional Buddhist teachings in his "Shōbōgenzō." Nonetheless, they reach quite different conclusions about the possibility of language expressing a "true" understanding of the world.
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  29. David Loy (1997). A Zen Cloud? Comparing Zen Koan Practice with The Cloud of Unknowing. Budhi: A Journal of Ideas and Culture 1 (2):15-37.
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  30. David Loy (1996). Beyond Good and Evil? A Buddhist Critique of Nietzsche. Asian Philosophy 6 (1):37 – 57.
    Abstract In what ways was Nietzsche right, from a Buddhist perspective, and where did he go wrong? Nietzsche understood how the distinction we make between this world and a higher spiritual realm serves our need for security, and he saw the bad faith in religious values motivated by this need. He did not perceive how his alternative, more aristocratic values, also reflects the same anxiety. Nietzsche realised how the search for truth is motivated by a sublimated desire for symbolic security; (...)
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  31. David R. Loy (1996). Buddhism and Bioethics, by Damien Keown. Bioethics 10:250-256.
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  32. David Loy (1995). On the Duality of Culture and Nature. Philosophica 55.
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  33. David Loy (1994). Preparing for Something That Never Happens. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):47-68.
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  34. David Loy (1994). Preparing for Something That Never Happens: The Means/Ends Problem in Modern Culture. International Studies in Philosophy 26 (4):47-68.
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  35. David Loy (1993). Indra's Postmodern Net. Philosophy East and West 43 (3):481-510.
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  36. David Loy (1993). Transcendence East and West. Man and World 26 (4):403-427.
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  37. David Loy (1992). Trying to Become Real. International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (4):403-425.
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  38. David R. Loy (1991). Buddhism and Money: The Repression of Emptiness Today. In. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press. 297--312.
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  39. David Loy (1990). The Nonduality of Life and Death: A Buddhist View of Repression. Philosophy East and West 40 (2):151-174.
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  40. David Loy (1988/1997). Nonduality: A Study in Comparative Philosophy. Humanities Press.
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  41. David Loy (1988). The Path of No-Path: Śankara and Dōgen on the Paradox of Practice. Philosophy East and West 38 (2):127-146.
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  42. David Loy (1987). On the Meaning of the I Ching. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 14 (1):39-57.
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  43. David Loy (1987). The Clôture of Deconstruction. International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (1):59-80.
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  44. David Loy (1986). Nondual Thinking. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 13 (3):293-309.
  45. David Loy (1986). The Mahāyāna Deconstruction of Time. Philosophy East and West 36 (1):13-23.
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  46. David Loy (1985). Chapter One of the "Tao Tê Ching": A 'New' Interpretation. Religious Studies 21 (3):369 - 379.
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  47. David Loy (1985). The Paradox of Causality in Mādhyamika. International Philosophical Quarterly 25 (1):63-72.
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  48. David Loy (1985). Wei-Wu-Wei: Nondual Action. Philosophy East and West 35 (1):73-86.
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  49. David Loy (1984). How Not to Criticize Nāgārjuna: A Response to L. Stafford Betty. Philosophy East and West 34 (4):437-445.
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  50. David Loy (1983). How Many Nondualities Are There? Journal of Indian Philosophy 11 (4):413-426.
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