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David M. Buss [22]David M. H. Buss [1]
  1. David M. Buss (forthcoming). Just Another Brick in the Wall: Building the Foundation of Evolutionary Psychology. Human Nature: A Critical Reader.
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  2. Daniel Conroy-Beam & David M. Buss (2014). A Deeper Integration of Selfish Goal Theory and Modern Evolutionary Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):140-141.
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  3. David M. Buss (2011). Domains of Deception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (1):18-18.
    The von Hippel & Trivers theory of self-deception will gain added traction by identifying psychological design features that come into play in different domains of deception. These include the domains of mating, kinship, coalition formation, status hierarchy negotiation, parenting, friendship, and enmity. Exploring these domains will uncover psychological adaptations and sex-differentiated patterns of self-deception that are logically entailed by their theory.
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  4. David M. Buss (2009). The Multiple Adaptive Problems Solved by Human Aggression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (3-4):271-272.
    Human psychology contains adaptations to deploy aggression as one solution to many distinct adaptive problems. These include expropriating resources, defending against incursions, establishing encroachment-deterring reputations, inflicting costs on rivals, ascending dominance hierarchies, dissuading partner defection, eliminating fitness-draining offspring, and obtaining new mates. Aggression is not a singular strategy. Comprehensive theories must identify the of multiple adaptations for aggression.
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  5. David M. Buss (2009). The Role of Emotions in Adaptations for Exploitation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):391-392.
    Emotion expression serves functions in exploitative resource-acquisition strategies that may not include relationship reciprocity. These include rendering victims more exploitable and signaling one's status as non-exploitable. A comprehensive theory of emotion expressions must explain their role in adaptations for exploitation, as well as evolved defenses against those pursuing a strategy of exploitation.
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  6. Cari D. Goetz, Carin Perilloux & David M. Buss (2009). Attachment Strategies Across Sex, Ontogeny, and Relationship Type. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (1):28-29.
    We propose that middle childhood female ambivalent attachment, given the adaptive problem of uncertainty of future investment, is designed to evoke immediate investment from current caregivers, rather than new investment sources. We suggest greater specificity of strategic attachment solutions to adaptive problems that differ by sex, time, and relationship type.
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  7. Martie G. Haselton & David M. Buss (2009). Error Management Theory and the Evolution of Misbeliefs. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):522-523.
    We argue that many evolved biases produced through selective forces described by error management theory are likely to entail misbeliefs. We illustrate our argument with the male sexual overperception bias. A misbelief could create motivational impetus for courtship, overcome the inhibiting effects of anxiety about rejection, and in some cases transform an initially sexually uninterested woman into an interested one.
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  8. David M. Buss (2006). The Evolutionary Genetics of Personality: Does Mutation Load Signal Relationship Load? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):409-409.
    The mutation-selection hypothesis may extend to understanding normal personality variation. Traits such as emotional stability, agreeableness, and conscientiousness figure strongly in mate selection and show evidence of non-additive genetic variance. They are linked with reproductively relevant outcomes, including longevity, resource acquisition, and mating success. Evolved difference-detection adaptations may function to spurn individuals whose high mutation load signals a burdensome relationship load. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  9. David M. Buss (2005). Sex Differences in the Design Features of Socially Contingent Mating Adaptations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):278-279.
    Schmitt's study provides strong support for sexual strategies theory (Buss & Schmitt 1993) – that men and women both have evolved a complex menu of mating strategies, selectively deployed depending on personal, social, and ecological contexts. It also simultaneously refutes social structural theories founded on the core premise that women and men are sexually monomorphic in their psychology of human mating. Further progress depends on identifying evolved psychological design features sensitive to the costs and benefits of pursuing each strategy from (...)
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  10. David M. H. Buss (2005). Martie. The Evolution of Jealousy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (9):509-510.
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  11. David M. Buss & Martie Haselton (2005). The Evolution of Jealousy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (11):506-507.
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  12. Todd K. Shackelford, Martin Voracek, David P. Schmitt, David M. Buss, Viviana A. Weekes-Shackelford & Richard L. Michalski (2004). Romantic Jealousy in Early Adulthood and in Later Life. Human Nature 15 (3):283-300.
    Young men are more distressed by a partner’s sexual infidelity, whereas young women are more distressed by a partner’s emotional infidelity. The present research investigated (a) whether the sex difference in jealousy replicates in an older sample, and (b) whether younger people differ from older people in their selection of the more distressing infidelity scenario. We presented forced-choice dilemmas to 202 older people (mean age = 67 years) and to 234 younger people (mean age = 20 years). The sex difference (...)
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  13. Todd K. Shackelford, David M. Buss & Kevin Bennett (2002). Forgiveness or Breakup: Sex Differences in Responses to a Partner's Infidelity. Cognition and Emotion 16 (2):299-307.
  14. April L. Bleske & David M. Buss (2000). A Comprehensive Theory of Human Mating Must Explain Between-Sex and Within-Sex Differences in Mating Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):593-594.
    Gangestad & Simpson make a major contribution by highlighting the importance of mate choice for good genes, the costs of alternative strategies, and tradeoffs inherent in human mating. By downplaying sex differences and ignoring the nongenetic adaptive benefits of short term mating, however, they undermine their goal of “strategic pluralism” by presenting a theory devoid of many documented complexities of human mating.
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  15. David M. Buss (1999). Evolutionary Psychology: The New Science of the Mind. Allyn and Bacon.
     
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  16. David M. Buss & Joshua Duntley (1999). The Evolutionary Psychology of Patriarchy: Women Are Not Passive Pawns in Men's Game. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (2):219-220.
    We applaud Campbell's cogent arguments for the evolution of female survival mechanisms but take issue with several key conceptual claims: the treatment of patriarchy; the implicit assumption that women are passive pawns in a male game of media exploitation; and the neglect of the possibility that media images exploit existing evolved psychological mechanisms rather than create them.
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  17. David M. Buss (1994). Individual Differences in Mating Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (3):581-582.
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  18. David M. Buss (1991). Mate Selection for Good Parenting Skills. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (3):520-521.
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  19. David M. Buss (1991). Toward an Empirical Foundation for Evolutionary Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (2):301-302.
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  20. David M. Buss (1989). Sex Differences in Human Mate Preferences: Evolutionary Hypotheses Tested in 37 Cultures. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):1.
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  21. David M. Buss (1989). Toward an Evolutionary Psychology of Human Mating. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (1):39.
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  22. David M. Buss (1987). Evolutionary Hypotheses and Behavioral Genetic Methods: Hopes for a Union of Two Disparate Disciplines. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 10 (1):20.
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  23. David M. Buss (1985). Inheritance Strategies, Resource Allocation, and Causal Alternatives for Individual Traits. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):671-672.
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