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  1. Wan-Yu Hung, Julia Simner, Richard Shillcock & David M. Eagleman (2014). Synaesthesia in Chinese Characters: The Role of Radical Function and Position. Consciousness and Cognition 24:38-48.
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  2. Don Vaughn & David M. Eagleman (2013). Spatial Warping by Oriented Line Detectors Can Counteract Neural Delays. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    The slow speed of neural transmission necessitates that cortical visual information from dynamic scenes will lag reality. The “perceiving the present” (PTP) hypothesis suggests that the visual system can mitigate the effect of such delays by spatially warping scenes to look as they will in ~100 ms from now (Changizi, 2001). We here show that the Hering illusion, in which straight lines appear bowed, can be induced by a background of optic flow, consistent with the PTP hypothesis. However, importantly, the (...)
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  3. Mingbo Cai, Chess Stetson & David M. Eagleman (2012). A Neural Model for Temporal Order Judgments and Their Active Recalibration: A Common Mechanism for Space and Time? Frontiers in Psychology 3.
    When observers experience a constant delay between their motor actions and sensory feedback, their perception of the temporal order between actions and sensations adapt (Stetson et al., 2006a). We present here a novel neural model that can explain temporal order judgments (TOJs) and their recalibration. Our model employs three ubiquitous features of neural systems: 1) information pooling, 2) opponent processing, and 3) synaptic scaling. Specifically, the model proposes that different populations of neurons encode different delays between motor-sensory events, the outputs (...)
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  4. David M. Eagleman (2010). Duration Illusions and Predictability. In Anna C. Nobre & Jennifer T. Coull (eds.), Attention and Time. Oup Oxford. 151.
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  5. David M. Eagleman & Melvyn A. Goodale (2009). Why Color Synesthesia Involves More Than Color. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (7):288-292.
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  6. David M. Eagleman (2008). Prediction and Postdiction: Two Frameworks with the Goal of Delay Compensation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):205-206.
    Although prediction is one of the key tasks of intelligent brains, it often proves impossible in an unpredictably changing world. Hence, brains often decide what happened retrospectively. This framework of postdiction, the opposite of prediction, stands as an alternative or complimentary framework to prediction. I further show how motor-sensory recalibration demonstrates delay compensation at the perceptual level.
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  7. Alex O. Holcombe, Colin W. G. Clifford, David M. Eagleman & Pooya Pakarian (2005). Illusory Motion Reversal in Tune with Motion Detectors. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (12):559-560.
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  8. David M. Eagleman & P. Read Montague (2003). Learning and Memory, Models Of. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  9. David M. Eagleman & Alex O. Holcombe (2002). Causality and the Perception of Time. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (8):323-325.
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  10. David M. Eagleman & P. R. Montague (2002). Models of Learning and Memory. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
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  11. David M. Eagleman & Terrence J. Sejnowski (2000). Motion Integration and Postdiction in Visual Awareness. Science 287 (5460):2036-2038.