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Profile: David Macarthur (University of Sydney)
  1. David Macarthur, The Commitments of Naturalism – A Dialog.
    As a worldview, naturalism depends on a set of cognitive commitments from which flow certain propositions about reality and human nature. These propositions in turn might have implications for how we live, for social policy, and for human flourishing. But the presuppositions, basis, and implications of naturalism are not uncontested, and indeed there’s considerable debate about them among naturalists themselves.
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  2. David Macarthur (2014). Possibilities of Perception by Church, Jennifer. :1-4.
    Possibilities of Perception by Church, Jennifer. . ???aop.label???. doi: 10.1080/00048402.2014.945602.
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  3. David Macarthur (2014). Reflections on “Architecture is a Gesture” (Wittgenstein). Paragrana 23 (1).
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  4. David Macarthur (2014). What Goes Without Seeing: Marriage, Sex and the Ordinary in The Awful Truth. Film-Philosophy 18 (1):92-109.
    This paper offers a reading of The Awful Truth (Leo McCarey, 1937) in order to meditate further on Stanley Cavell's articulation of the themes of the ordinary and perfectionist marriage as exemplified in the genre of films he calls the Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage (which includes The Awful Truth ) in Cavell (1981) and (1996). I explore different ways in which this film and the medium of film generally are capable of making the unseen visible: revealing the ordinary that is (...)
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  5. Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (2010). Introduction: Science, Naturalism, and the Problem of Normativity. In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press.
     
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  6. Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.) (2010). Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press.
    Naturalism and Normativity engages with both sides of this debate. Essays explore philosophical options for understanding normativity in the space between scientific naturalism and Platonic supernaturalism.
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  7. David Macarthur (2010). Aesthetics (Analytic). In Graham Oppy Nick Trakakis (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy in Australia and New Zealand. Monash UP.
    If Western philosophy is a series of footnotes to Plato, then aesthetics is a series of footnotes to Kant. This is as true of the analytic tradition as of the Continental. But there has been an important change of emphasis in the object of inquiry of analytic aesthetics, which predominantly concerns theorising about the experience and criticism of works of art. Kant’s idea of aesthetics as primarily concerned with beauty, or heightened or intensified perceptual experiences of natural phenomena, has largely (...)
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  8. David Macarthur (2010). Taking the Human Sciences Seriously. In Mario de Caro & David Macarthur (eds.), Naturalism and Normativity. Columbia University Press.
     
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  9. David Macarthur (2009). Review of Jack Ritchie, Understanding Naturalism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).
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  10. David Macarthur (2008). Pragmatism, Metaphysical Quietism, and the Problem of Normativity. Philosophical Topics 36 (1):193-209.
    There has always existed in the world, and there will always continue to exist, some kind of metaphysics, and with it the dialectic that is natural to pure reason. It is therefore the first and most important task of philosophy to deprive metaphysics, once and for all, of its injurious influence, by attacking its errors at their source. - Kant CPR:B xxxi..
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  11. David Macarthur (2008). Putnam, Pragmatism and the Fate of Metaphysics. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 4 (2):33-46.
    In Renewing Philosophy (1992), having surveyed a number of metaphysical programs in contemporary analytic philosophy, including Bernard Williams’ appeal to an absolute conception of the world, Ruth Millikan’s attempt to reduce intentionality to biological function, and Nelson Goodman’s irrealism, Putnam concludes as follows: I have argued that the decision of a large part of contemporary analytic philosophy to become a form of metaphysics is a mistake. Indeed, contemporary analytic metaphysics is in many ways a parody of the great metaphysics of (...)
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  12. David Macarthur (2008). Quinean Naturalism in Question. Philo 11 (1):5-18.
    This paper is a critical discussion of Quine’s naturalist credos: (1) physicalism; (2) there is no first philosophy; (3) philosophy is continuous with science; and (4) the only responsible theory of the world as a whole is scientific theory. The aim is to show that Quine’s formulations admit of two readings: a strong reading (often Quine’s own) which is compatible with reductive forms of naturalism but implausible; and a mild reading which is plausible but suggestive of more liberal forms of (...)
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  13. David Macarthur (2007). Wittgenstein and Scepticism - Edited by Denis Mcmanus. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 48 (2):168-170.
    Wittgenstein has been likened to a Pyrrhonian sceptic, one who employs dialectical skills to avoid rather than defend doctrine, but it is his role in exposing and excavating the sands upon which modern scepticisms have been built that is the subject of this new volume of largely original essays. The first three chapters, by Crispin Wright, Akeel Bilgrami and Michael Williams find inspiration in On Certainty for singling out key moves in the initial set-up of external world scepticism; the next (...)
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  14. David Macarthur (2007). Pragmatism, Quasi-Realism, and the Global Challenge. In C. J. Misak (ed.), New Pragmatists. Oxford University Press. 91.
    William James said that sometimes detailed philosophical argument is irrelevant. Once a current of thought is really under way, trying to oppose it with argument is like planting a stick in a river to try to alter its course: “round your obstacle flows the water and ‘gets there just the same’”. He thought pragmatism was such a river. There is a contemporary river that sometimes calls itself pragmatism, although other titles are probably better. At any rate it is the denial (...)
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  15. David Macarthur (2007). Review of Paul Horwich, Reflections on Meaning. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2007 (3).
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  16. David Macarthur (2006). Skepticism, Self-Knowledge and Responsibility. In Stephen Hetherington (ed.), Aspects of Knowing. Elsevier. 97.
    Modern skepticism can be usefully divided into two camps: the Cartesian and the Humean.1 Cartesian skepticism is a matter of a theoretical doubt that has little or no practical import in our everyday lives. Its employment concerns whether or not we can achieve a special kind of certain knowledge – something Descartes calls “scientia” 2—that is far removed from our everyday aims or standards of epistemic appraisal. Alternatively, Humean skepticism engages the ancient skeptical concern with whether we have good reason, (...)
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  17. Mario De Caro & David Macarthur (eds.) (2004). Naturalism in Question. Harvard University Press.
    This volume presents a group of leading thinkers who criticize scientific naturalism not in the name of some form of supernaturalism, but in order to defend a ...
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  18. David Macarthur (2004). Naturalizing the Human or Humanizing Nature: Science, Nature and the Supernatural. Erkenntnis 61 (1):29-51.
    The present paper challenges the narrow scientistic conception of Nature that underlies current projects of naturalization involving, say, evaluative or intentional discourse. It is more plausible to hold that science provides only a partial characterization of the natural world. I consider McDowell's articulation of a more liberal naturalism, one which recognizes autonomous normative facts about reasons, meanings and values, as genuine constituents of Nature on a more liberal conception of it. Several critics have claimed that this account is vitiated by (...)
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  19. David Macarthur (2004). Putnam's Natural Realism and the Question of a Perceptual Interface. Philosophical Explorations 7 (2):167-181.
    In his Dewey Lectures,1 Hilary Putnam argues that contemporary philosophy cannot solve nor see its way past the traditional problem of how language or thought hooks on to.
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  20. David Macarthur & Mario De Caro (2004). Introduction - the Nature of Naturalism. In Naturalism in Question. Harvard University Press.
    The critical concern of the present volume is contemporary naturalism, both in its scientific version and as represented by newly emerging hopes for another, philosophically more liberal, naturalism.1 The papers collected here are state-of-the-art discussions that question the appeal, rational motivations, and presuppositions of scientific naturalism across a broad range of philosophical topics. As an alternative to scientific naturalism, we offer the outlines of a new non- reductive form of naturalism and a more inclusive conception of nature than any provided (...)
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  21. David Macarthur & Mario De Caro (eds.) (2004). Naturalism in Question. Harvard University Press.
    This volume presents a group of leading thinkers who criticize scientific naturalism not in the name of some form of supernaturalism, but in order to defend a more inclusive or liberal naturalism.
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  22. David Macarthur (2003). McDowell, Scepticism, and the 'Veil of Perception'. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):175-190.
    McDowell has argued that external world scepticism is a pressing problem only in so far as we accept, on the basis of the argument from illusion, the claim that perceiving that p and hallucinating that p involve a highest common factor.
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  23. David Macarthur (2003). Richard H. Popkin and Avrum Stroll, Skeptical Philosophy for Everyone Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (4):272-274.
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  24. David Macarthur (2003). The Seriousness of Doubt and Our Natural Trust in the Senses in the First Meditation. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 33 (2):159 - 181.
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