10 found
Sort by:
  1. David McFarland, Keith Stenning & Maggie McGonigle (eds.) (2012). The Complex Mind. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: -- Preface -- Acknowledgements -- Notes on Contributors -- PART I: COMPLEXITY IN ANIMAL MINDS -- Introduction: M.McGonigle-Chalmers -- Relational and Absolute Discrimination Learning by Squirrel Monkeys: Establishing a Common Ground with Human Cognition; B.T.Jones -- Serial List Retention by Non-Human Primates: Complexity and Cognitive Continuity; F.R.Treichler -- The Use of Spatial Structure in Working Memory: A Comparative Standpoint; C.De Lillo -- The Emergence of Linear Sequencing in Children: A Continuity Account and a Formal Model; M.McGonigle-Chalmers&I.Kusel (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David McFarland (2008). Guilty Robots, Happy Dogs: The Question of Alien Minds. OUP Oxford.
    When we interact with animals, we intuitively read thoughts and feelings into their expressions and actions - it is easy to suppose that they have minds like ours. And as technology grows more sophisticated, we might soon find ourselves interpreting the behaviour of robots too in human terms. -/- It is natural for us to humanize other beings in this way, but is it philosophically or scientifically justifiable? How different might the minds of animals or machines be to ours? As (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David McFarland, Thomas Bosser, Sunil Cherian & Wade O. Troxell (1997). Intelligent Behavior in Animals and Robots. Minds and Machines 7 (3):452-455.
  4. Peter Lanz & David Mcfarland (1995). On Representation, Goals and Cognition. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 9 (2):121 – 133.
    Abstract In this paper we address three concepts that are much talked about in the animal robotics community. These concepts are (1) representations, (2) goals, and (3) minimal cognition. We want to distinguish between information as an objective commodity and representation as something which involves a user, i.e. a system which accesses and uses information. Information per se lies out there and exists independently of any system that makes use of it. Representations presuppose design and require a user. We want (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David McFarland (1995). Opportunity Versus Goals in Robots, Animals and People. In H. Roitblat & Jean-Arcady Meyer (eds.), Comparative Approaches to Cognitive Science. Mit Press. 415--433.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. David McFarland (1992). Animals as Cost-Based Robots. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 6 (2):133 – 153.
    Abstract The frame problem is a problem that arises when an agent attempts to assess the consequences of future behaviour. Strictly, it is a problem of modelling that arises during planning. The problem arises because many of the possible consequences of a planned action are not really relevant to the decision whether to perform the action. The frame problem is typical of the classical approach to artificial intelligence, but it is evident that animals do not suffer from this problem. In (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. David McFarland (1991). Defining Motivation and Cognition in Animals. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 5 (2):153 – 170.
    Abstract Motivation in an automaton, whether it be artificial or animate, is simply that aspect of the total state that determines the behaviour. In an autonomous agent, which has a degree of self?control, the motivational state includes a cognitive evaluation of the likely consequences of possible future behaviour. Such evaluation implies optimization with respect to some motivational criterion.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David McFarland (1990). Suffering by Analogy. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):27.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. David McFarland (1987). Everyday Ethics for Family Physicians. Hastings Center Report 17 (1):37-38.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. David McFarland (1983). Intentions as Goads. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):369.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation