Search results for 'David Money' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Alfred David (1986). RA Shoaf, Dante, Chaucer, and the Currency of the Word: Money, Images, and Reference in Late Medieval Poetry. Norman, Okla.: Pilgrim Books, 1983. Pp. Xv, 312. [REVIEW] Speculum 61 (2):468-470.score: 360.0
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  2. Nicholas P. Money (1997). In Search of Rules in Fungal Development Patterns in Fungal Development Siu-Wai Chiu David Moore. Bioscience 47 (9):628-629.score: 360.0
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  3. Patricia Fara & David Money (2004). Isaac Newton and Augustan Anglo-Latin Poetry. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):549-571.score: 240.0
  4. David Mason, Carola Hillenbrand & Kevin Money (forthcoming). Are Informed Citizens More Trusting? Transparency of Performance Data and Trust Towards a British Police Force. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 240.0
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  5. Thomas Frangenberg & Ludovico David (1994). The Geometry of a Dome: Ludovico David 's Dichiarazione Della Pittura Della Capella Del Collegio Clementino di Roma. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 57:191-208.score: 180.0
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  6. Evans David (2007). The Ethics of War Richard Sorabji & David Rodin (Eds.) Ashgate, 2006, Pp. IX+ 253. Philosophy 82 (2):370.score: 180.0
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  7. E. G. Turner, M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven, E. Boswinkel, E. P. Wegener, A. H. R. E. Paap, M. Hombert & Cl Preaux (1953). Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. I. The Warren PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. II. Einige Wiener PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. III. Some Oxford PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. IV. De Herodoti reliquiis in papyris et membranis Aegyptiis servatisPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. V. Recherches sur le Recensement dans l'Egypte romaine (P. Brux. Inv. E7616)Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava,. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:163.score: 180.0
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  8. García Bacca & Juan David (2002). Ensayos y Estudios de Juan David García Bacca. Fundación Para la Cultura Urbana.score: 180.0
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  9. Archard David (forthcoming). Should We Teach Patriotism?/David Archard. Studies in Philosophy and Education.–Ny.score: 180.0
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  10. David Tyfield (2008). The Price of Truth: How Money Affects the Norms of Science, David Resnik. Oxford University Press, 2007, XIII + 224 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 24 (1):123-129.score: 126.0
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  11. F. S. Zuckerman (2002). Money Unmade: Barter and the Fate of Russian Capitalism. By David Woodruff. The European Legacy 7 (2):279-280.score: 120.0
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  12. David B. Resnik (2007). The Price of Truth: How Money Affects the Norms of Science. OUP USA.score: 60.0
    Modern science is big business. Governments, universities, and corporations have invested billions of dollars in scientific and technological research in the hope of obtaining power and profit. For the most part, this investment has benefited science and society, leading to new discoveries, inventions, disciplines, specialties, jobs, and career opportunities. However, there is a dark side to the influx of money into science. Unbridled pursuit of financial gain in science can undermine scientific norms, such as objectivity, honesty, openness, respect for (...)
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  13. Maria Pia Paganelli (2009). David Hume on Monetary Policy: A Retrospective Approach. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):65-85.score: 54.0
    Monetary policy is a modern idea of which David Hume is generally considered a precursor. Moreover, thanks to Milton Friedman and Robert Lucas, he is often presented as one of the first and most illustrious endorser of monetarism. This paper argues against this view, and in agreement with Joseph Schumpeter, that Hume's contribution to economics, while not insignificant, cannot claim any real novelties. It offers an interpretation of Hume as a descendant of a pre-modern understanding of money rather (...)
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  14. Roger L. Emerson (2008). Essays on David Hume, Medical Men, and the Scottish Enlightenment: Industry, Knowledge, and Humanity. Ashgate Pub. Ltd..score: 54.0
    The world in which the Scottish Enlightenment took shape -- Archibald Campbell, 3rd Duke of Argyll (1682-1761) : patronage and the creation of the Scottish Enlightenment -- How many Scots were enlightened? -- What did eighteenth-century Scottish students read? -- Our excellent and never to be forgotten friend : David Hume (26 April 1711- 25 August 1776) -- Hume's intellectual development : part II, 1711-1762 -- Hume's histories -- Hume's economics -- Numbering the medics -- Numbers and money (...)
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  15. A. R. Riggs (1985). David Hume's Practical Economics. Hume Studies 11 (2):154-165.score: 54.0
    David hume rejected utopian experiments in government. He presented his own "idea of a perfect commonwealth," but his approach to political economy was practical and surprisingly modern. In nine essays on economics he argued that 1) national strength lies in productivity; 2) trade indirectly benefits the state by enriching all the people; 3) luxury, Economic growth and refinement in the arts are compatible; 4) the international flow of money should be encouraged; 5) rate of interest is a key (...)
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  16. David A. Booth (2006). Money as Tool, Money as Resource: The Biology of Collecting Items for Their Own Sake. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):180-181.score: 42.0
    Money does not stimulate receptors in mimicry of natural agonists; so, by definition, money is not a drug. Attractions of money other than to purchase goods and services could arise from instincts similar to hoarding in other species. Instinctual activities without evolutionary function include earning a billion and writing for BBS. (Published Online April 5 2006).
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  17. David Hume, Of Money.score: 36.0
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  18. David Hartley (1992). The Compacts Initiative: Values for Money? British Journal of Educational Studies 40 (4):321 - 334.score: 36.0
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  19. David Roberts (1996). Georg Simmel's Philosophy of Money: Reflexions on the Relation Between Philosophy and History. Thesis Eleven 44 (1):12-27.score: 36.0
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  20. David M. Schaps (2009). History (S.) Von Reden Money in Ptolemaic Egypt: From the Macedonian Conquest to the End of the Third Century BC. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007. Pp. Xxii + 354, Illus. £55. 9780521852647. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:191-.score: 36.0
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  21. David M. Schaps (2007). Seaford (R.) Money and the Early Greek Mind. Homer, Philosophy, Tragedy. Pp. Xii + 370. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2004. Paper, £18.99, US$29.99 (Cased, £50, US$80). ISBN: 978-0-521-53992-0 (978-0-521-83228-1 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (01):10-.score: 36.0
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  22. Theodore G. Krontiris & David Rubenson (2008). Matchmaking, Metrics and Money: A Pathway to Progress in Translational Research. Bioessays 30 (10):1025-1029.score: 36.0
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  23. David R. Loy (1991). Buddhism and Money: The Repression of Emptiness Today. In. In Charles Wei-Hsun Fu & Sandra A. Wawrytko (eds.), Buddhist Ethics and Modern Society: An International Symposium. Greenwood Press. 297--312.score: 36.0
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  24. David Oldroyd (2005). Following the Money: An Internalist Social History of a Scientist. [REVIEW] Metascience 14 (3):391-399.score: 36.0
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  25. David Prater (2013). Drift: A Way. Continent 3 (2):31-33.score: 30.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  26. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing.score: 24.0
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  27. Anthony Skelton (2013). Sidgwick’s Argument for Utilitarianism and His Moral Epistemology: A Reply to David Phillips. Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.score: 24.0
    David Phillips’s Sidgwickian Ethics is a penetrating contribution to the scholarly and philosophical understanding of Henry Sidgwick’s The Methods of Ethics. This note focuses on Phillips’s understanding of (aspects of) Sidgwick’s argument for utilitarianism and the moral epistemology to which he subscribes. In § I, I briefly outline the basic features of the argument that Sidgwick provides for utilitarianism, noting some disagreements with Phillips along the way. In § II, I raise some objections to Phillips’s account of the epistemology (...)
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  28. Barry Maguire (2013). Defending David Lewis's Modal Reduction. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):129-147.score: 24.0
    David Lewis claims that his theory of modality successfully reduces modal items to nonmodal items. This essay will clarify this claim and argue that it is true. This is largely an exercise within ‘Ludovician Polycosmology’: I hope to show that a certain intuitive resistance to the reduction and a set of related objections misunderstand the nature of the Ludovician project. But these results are of broad interest since they show that would-be reductionists have more formidable argumentative resources than is (...)
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  29. T. L. P. Tang (2007). Income and Quality of Life: Does the Love of Money Make a Difference? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 72 (4):375 - 393.score: 24.0
    This paper examines a model of income and quality of life that controls the love of money, job satisfaction, gender, and marital status and treats employment status (full-time versus part-time), income level, and gender as moderators. For the whole sample, income was not significantly related to quality of life when this path was examined alone. When all variables were controlled, income was negatively related to quality of life. When (1) the love of money was negatively correlated to job (...)
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  30. Stephen E. G. Lea & Paul Webley (2006). Money as Tool, Money as Drug: The Biological Psychology of a Strong Incentive. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):161-209.score: 24.0
    Why are people interested in money? Specifically, what could be the biological basis for the extraordinary incentive and reinforcing power of money, which seems to be unique to the human species? We identify two ways in which a commodity which is of no biological significance in itself can become a strong motivator. The first is if it is used as a tool, and by a metaphorical extension this is often applied to money: it is used instrumentally, in (...)
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  31. Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Randy K. Chiu (2003). Income, Money Ethic, Pay Satisfaction, Commitment, and Unethical Behavior: Is the Love of Money the Root of Evil for Hong Kong Employees? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (1):13 - 30.score: 24.0
    This study examines a model involving income, the love of money, pay satisfaction, organizational commitment, job changes, and unethical behavior among 211 full-time employees in Hong Kong, China. Direct paths suggested that the love of money was related to unethical behavior, but income (money) was not. Indirect paths showed that income was negatively related to the love of money that, in turn, was negatively related to pay satisfaction that, in turn, was negatively associated with unethical behavior. (...)
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  32. Daniel Howard-Snyder (2001). Review of David O'Connor, God and Inscrutable Evil. [REVIEW] Philosophical Review.score: 24.0
    This is a critical review of David O'Connor's book, God and Inscrutable Evil.
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  33. J. F. Humphrey (2010). Reflections on the Economic Crisis. The Transcendental Character of Money: An Exposition of Karl Marx’s Argument in the Grundrisse. Nordicum-Mediterraneum, Vol. 5, No. 1 (March 2010) 5 (1).score: 24.0
    An exposition of Karl Marx’s argument in the Grundrisse for the logical development of money, this essay is divided into three parts. Since Marx is concerned to distinguish himself and his method from that of the seventeenth century political economists, I begin my paper with a brief reflection on “the scientifically correct method” or the “theoretical method” (Grundrisse 101 and 102). The second part of this paper considers how Marx justifies beginning his reflection with the concept of production in (...)
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  34. Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Yuh-Jia Chen (2008). Intelligence Vs. Wisdom: The Love of Money, Machiavellianism, and Unethical Behavior Across College Major and Gender. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):1 - 26.score: 24.0
    This research investigates the efficacy of business ethics intervention, tests a theoretical model that the love of money is directly or indirectly related to propensity to engage in unethical behavior (PUB), and treats college major (business vs. psychology) and gender (male vs. female) as moderators in multi-group analyses. Results suggested that business students who received business ethics intervention significantly changed their conceptions of unethical behavior and reduced their propensity to engage in theft; while psychology students without intervention had no (...)
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  35. Roberto Luna-Arocas & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2004). The Love of Money, Satisfaction, and the Protestant Work Ethic: Money Profiles Among Univesity Professors in the U.S.A. And Spain. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):329-354.score: 24.0
    This study tests the hypothesis that university professors (lecturers) (in the U.S. and Spain) with different money profiles (based on Factors Success, Budget, Motivator, Equity, and Evil of the Love of Money Scale) will differ in work-related attitudes and satisfaction. Results suggested that Achieving Money Worshipers (with high scores on Factors Success, Motivator, Equity, and Budget) had high income, Work Ethic, and high satisfaction with pay level, pay administration, and internal equity comparison but low satisfaction with external (...)
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  36. Scott John Vitell, Jatinder J. Singh & Joseph G. P. Paolillo (2007). Consumers' Ethical Beliefs: The Roles of Money, Religiosity and Attitude Toward Business. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):369 - 379.score: 24.0
    This article presents the results of a study that investigated the roles that one’s money ethic, religiosity and attitude toward business play in determining consumer attitudes/beliefs in various situations regarding questionable consumer practices. Two dimensions of religiosity – intrinsic and extrinsic religiousness – were studied. A global scale of money ethic was examined, as was a global measure of attitude toward business. Results indicate that both types of religiosity as well as one’s money ethic and attitude toward (...)
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  37. Daniel von Wachter (2004). The Ontological Turn Misunderstood: How to Misunderstand David Armstrong’s Theory of Possibility. Metaphysica 5:105-114.score: 24.0
    This article argues that there is a great divide between semantics and metaphysics. Much of what is called metaphysics today is still stuck in the linguistic turn. This is illustrated by showing how Fraser MacBride misunderstands David Armstrong's theory of modality.
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  38. Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Hsi Liu (2012). Love of Money and Unethical Behavior Intention: Does an Authentic Supervisor's Personal Integrity and Character (ASPIRE) Make a Difference? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 107 (3):295-312.score: 24.0
    We investigate the extent to which perceptions of the authenticity of supervisor’s personal integrity and character (ASPIRE) moderate the relationship between people’s love of money (LOM) and propensity to engage in unethical behavior (PUB) among 266 part-time employees who were also business students in a five-wave panel study. We found that a high level of ASPIRE perceptions was related to high love-of-money orientation, high self-esteem, but low unethical behavior intention (PUB). Unethical behavior intention (PUB) was significantly correlated with (...)
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  39. Adrian M. S. Piper, The Money Pump Is Necessarily Diachronic. Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin/Philosophy.score: 24.0
    In “The Irrelevance of the Diachronic Money-Pump Argument for Acyclicity,” The Journal of Philosophy CX, 8 (August 2013), 460-464, Johan E. Gustafsson contends that if Davidson, McKinsey and Suppes’ diachronic money-pump argument in their "Outlines of a Formal Theory of Value, I," Philosophy of Science 22 (1955), 140-160 is valid, so is the synchronic argument Gustafsson himself offers. He concludes that the latter renders irrelevant diachronic choice considerations in general, and the two best-known diachronic solutions to the (...) pump problem in particular. I argue here that this reasoning is incorrect, and that Gustafsson’s synchronic argument is faulty on independent grounds. Specifically, it is based on a false analogy between the derivation of a synchronic ordinal ranking from a transitive series of pairwise comparisons, and the putative derivation of such a ranking from an intransitive series. The latter is not possible under the assumption of revealed preference theory, and is highly improbable even if that assumption is rejected. Moreover, Gustafsson’s argument raises issues of fidelity to the historical texts that must be addressed. I conclude that the money pump, and cyclical choice more generally, are necessarily diachronic; and therefore that the two best-known diachronic solutions to the money pump problem remain relevant. (shrink)
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  40. Joseph Agassi (1971). Tautology and Testability in Economics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 1 (1):49-63.score: 24.0
    Economics is a science - at least positive economics must be. And science is in part applied mathematics, in part empirical observations and tests. Looking at the history of economics, one cannot find much testing done before the twentieth century, and even the collection of data, even in the manner Marx engaged in, was not common in his day. It is true that economic policy is an older field, and in that field much information is deployed for the purpose of (...)
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  41. J. Barkley Rosser, Emergence and Complexity in Austrian Economics.score: 24.0
    A deep theme of Austrian economics has been that of spontaneous order or selforganization of the economy. The origin of this theme dates to the putative founder of the Austrian School, Carl Menger, with his theory of the spontaneous emergence of money for transactions purposes in primitive economies being archetypal example (Menger, 1892). Menger drew this approach from the Scottish Enlightenment figures David Hume, Adam Ferguson, and Adam Smith, with the latter’s Wealth of Nations (1776) particularly important. The (...)
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  42. Marc Shell (1982/1993). Money, Language, and Thought: Literary and Philosophic Economies From the Medieval to the Modern Era. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 24.0
    "Shell offers admirably close readings [which are] often brilliant... Summary could do little more than hint at the riches laid open."-- The Eighteenth Century "A remarkable piece of work. Valuable for a wide range of readers from the expert to the inquiring generalist."-- Religious Studies Review In Money, Language, and Thought , Marc Shell explores the interactions between linguistic and economic production as they inform discourse from Chretien de Troyes to Heidegger.
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  43. Mark Hanin (2012). Naturalistic Moral Realism and Moral Disagreement: David Copp's Account. Res Publica 18 (4):283-301.score: 24.0
    To enhance the plausibility of naturalistic moral realism, David Copp develops an argument from epistemic defeaters aiming to show that strongly a priori synthetic moral truths do not exist. In making a case for the non-naturalistic position, I locate Copp’s account within the wider literature on peer disagreement; I identify key points of divergence between Copp’s doctrine and conciliatorist doctrines; I introduce the notion of ‘minimal moral competence’; I contend that some plausible benchmarks for minimal moral competence are grounded (...)
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  44. Hong Meng Wong (2008). Religiousness, Love of Money, and Ethical Attitudes of Malaysian Evangelical Christians in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):169 - 191.score: 24.0
    Recent research suggests there may be a link between religiousness and business ethics. This study seeks to add to the understanding of the relationship through a questionnaire survey on Malaysian Christians in business. The questionnaire taps into three different constructs. The religiousness construct is reflected in the level of participation in various common religious activities. The love of money construct is captured through the Love of Money Scale as used in Luna-Arocas and Tang [Journal of Business Ethics 50 (...)
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  45. Uwe Steinhoff, A Critique of David Miller’s Like Minded Group and Cooperative Practice Models of Collective Responsibility.score: 24.0
    Many authors writing about global justice seem to take national responsibility more or less for granted. Most of them, however, offer very little argument for their position. One of the few exceptions is David Miller. He offers two models of collective responsibility: the like-minded group model and the cooperative practice model. While some authors have criticized whether these two models are applicable to nations, as Miller intends, my criticism is more radical: I argue that these two models fail as (...)
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  46. Thomas Li-Ping Tang, Toto Sutarso, Grace Mei-Tzu Wu Davis, Dariusz Dolinski, Abdul Hamid Safwat Ibrahim & Sharon Lynn Wagner (2008). To Help or Not to Help? The Good Samaritan Effect and the Love of Money on Helping Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):865 - 887.score: 24.0
    This research tests a model of employee helping behavior (a component of Organizational Citizenship Behavior, OCB) that involves a direct path (Intrinsic Motives → Helping Behavior, the Good Samaritan Effect) and an indirect path (the Love of Money → Extrinsic Motives → Helping Behavior). Results for the full sample supported the Good Samaritan Effect. Further, the love of money was positively related to extrinsic motives that were negatively related with helping behavior. We tested the model across four cultures (...)
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  47. Linzhi Du & Thomas Li-Ping Tang (2005). Measurement Invariance Across Gender and Major: The Love of Money Among University Students in People's Republic of China. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (3):281 - 293.score: 24.0
    This study investigates measurement invariance of the 17-item-4-factor Love of Money Scale (LOMS) (Rich, Motivator, Success, and Important) across gender and college major among university students in People’s Republic of China. Results revealed configural (factor structures) invariance across gender. Metric (factor loadings) invariance across gender was not achieved based on chi-square change, but achieved based on fit indices change between unconstrained and constrained multi-group confirmatory factor analysis (MGCFA). Both configural invariance and metric invariance (chi-square change and fit indices (...)
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  48. Johan E. Gustafsson (2013). The Irrelevance of the Diachronic Money-Pump Argument for Acyclicity. Journal of Philosophy 110 (8):460–464.score: 24.0
    The money-pump argument is the standard argument for the acyclicity of rational preferences. The argument purports to show that agents with cyclic preferences are in some possible situations forced to act against their preference. In the usual, diachronic version of the money-pump argument, such agents accept a series of trades that leaves them worse off than before. Two stock objections are (i) that one may get the drift and refuse the trades and (ii) that one may adopt a (...)
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  49. Susan G. Sterrett, How Beliefs Make A Difference (PhD Dissertation).score: 24.0
    How are beliefs efficacious? One answer is: via rational intentional action. But there are other ways that beliefs are efficacious. This dissertation examines these other ways, and sketches an answer to the question of how beliefs are efficacious that takes into account how beliefs are involved in the full range of behavioral disciplines, from psychophysiology and cognition to social and economic phenomena. The account of how beliefs are efficacious I propose draws on work on active accounts of perception. I develop (...)
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  50. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).score: 24.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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