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  1. Ray Fitzpatrick, Josephine M. Norquist, Barnaby C. Reeves, Richard W. Morris, David W. Murray & Paul J. Gregg (2004). Equity and Need When Waiting for Total Hip Replacement Surgery. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 10 (1):3-9.
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  2. David J. Murray (2002). Review Article Mitchell G. Ash, Gestalt Psychology in German Culture, 1890-1967: Holism and the Quest for Objectivity. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1995, Xii + 513 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences 15 (2):135-146.
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  3. David J. Murray (2002). The SOC Framework and Short-Term Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (3):347-348.
    Using a particular formula for quantifying the effortlessness that Perruchet & Vinter suggest accompanies the detection of repetition among a set of representations concurrently in consciousness, it is shown that both the Sternberg function and the Cavanagh function, associated with immediate probed recognition tasks and memory span tasks, can be predicted.
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  4. Vittorio Possenti, Bruno Forte, David G. Murray & Valerio Zanone (2002). Verso una religione deprivatizzata nel postmoderno? Studium 98 (4):523-544.
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  5. David J. Murray (2001). Partial Matching Theory and the Memory Span. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (1):133-134.
    Partial matching theory, which maintains that some memory representations of target items in immediate memory are overwritten by others, can predict both a “theoretical” and an “actual” maximum memory span provided no chunking takes place during presentation. The latter is around 4 ± 2 items, the exact number being determined by the degree of similarity between the memory representations of two immediately successive target items.
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  6. David J. Murray (2000). The Trace Deletion Hypothesis in Relation to Partial Matching Theory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):43-44.
    Grodzinsky has argued that the traces deleted in Broca's aphasia are “phonetically silent but syntactically active” (sect. 2.). If we assume such traces to be visuospatial in nature, and adopt the term “overwriting” from the author's partial matching theory (1998), we can account for the errors made by Broca's aphasics in comprehending Grodzinsky's Examples (5a), (5b), and (6).
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  7. David J. Murray (1999). A “Presence/Absence Hypothesis” Concerning Hippocampal Function. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):462-463.
    According to a “presence/absence hypothesis,” the hippocampus is not necessary for the formation of learned associations between currently present stimuli and responses (as in classical conditioning), but is necessary whenever a stimulus, if it is to activate a particular response, must first activate a memory-representation of something not present in the here-and-now. The distinction between responses made to present stimuli as opposed to (memories of) absent stimuli was first stressed by Romanes (1889), but we find evidence in the target article (...)
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  8. David J. Murray & Marek Kucia (1995). Business Integrity in Transitional Economies: Central & Eastern Europe. Business Ethics 4 (2):76–82.
  9. David J. Murray (1994). What Are the “Goals” of the Human Memory System? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (4):676.
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  10. David J. Murray (1993). A Perspective for Viewing the History of Psychophysics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):115.
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  11. David J. Murray (1993). The Place of Psychophysics in the History of Sensory Science. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):166.
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  12. David Murray (1990). Trying to Make Sense By Peter Winch Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1987, Viii + 213 Pp., £27.50. [REVIEW] Philosophy 65 (251):102-.
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  13. David J. Murray (1989). Nineteenth-Century Attempts to Decide Between Psychophysical Laws. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (2):284.
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  14. David J. Murray (1986). Level of Articulation and Short-Term Recognition Following Brief Probe Delays. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (2):103-106.
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  15. David J. Murray (1985). What Textbooks Between 1887 and 1911 Said About Hemisphere Differences. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (4):644.
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  16. David F. Murray (1984). Flora of Tierra Del Fuego: A Labor of Love Flora of Tierra Del Fuego David M. Moore. Bioscience 34 (11):717-718.
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  17. David F. Murray (1981). Geobotanical Areas of Both Polar Tundras The Arctic and Antarctic: Their Division Into Geobotanical Areas V. D. Alexandrova. Bioscience 31 (2):153-153.
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  18. Barry Smith & David Murray (1981). Logic, Form and Matter. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 55:47 - 74.
    It is argued, on the basis of ideas derived from Wittgenstein's Tractatus and Husserl's Logical Investigations, that the formal comprehends more than the logical. More specifically: that there exist certain formal-ontological constants (part, whole, overlapping, etc.) which do not fall within the province of logic. A two-dimensional directly depicting language is developed for the representation of the constants of formal ontology, and means are provided for the extension of this language to enable the representation of certain materially necessary relations. The (...)
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  19. David Murray (1971). Hegel: Force and Understanding. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 5:163-173.
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