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  1. David Novak (2013). No Religion Without Idolatry: Mendelssohn's Jewish Enlightenment by Gideon Freudenthal (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (3):494-495.
    In his learned and insightful reading of the eighteenth-century German–Jewish philosopher Moses Mendelssohn, Gideon Freudenthal clearly wants to rescue him from total irrelevance. For Freudenthal claims that “Mendelssohn’s philosophy of Judaism—and of religion in general—can be defended and, in fact, still deserves contemporary interest” (12). But does Mendelssohn’s philosophy deserve the interest of philosophers who are interested in what is still significant in the present first for themselves and then for everybody else; or perhaps it deserves the interest only of (...)
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  2. David Novak (2013). Response to Edmund N. Santurri. Journal of Religious Ethics 41 (3):551-554.
    Barth and Niebuhr seemed to be wary of natural law because each of them thought that the “natural” in natural law means that natural law has to be rooted in natural theology. However, natural law today is more cogently formulated without any natural theology at all. “Natural law” means that law can be derived from the twofold character or nature of human personhood: the capacity for a communal relationship with other humans, and the capacity for a covenantal relationship with God, (...)
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  3. David Novak (2012). Defending Niebuhr From Hauerwas. Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (2):281-295.
    In his 2001 book, With the Grain of the Universe, Stanley Hauerwas has made an extended case for Karl Barth as the model for how to do Christian ethics, and for Reinhold Niebuhr as the model for how not to do it. Though Barth's closer and deeper theological connection to the Christian tradition appeals to a Jewish traditionalist by analogy, nevertheless, Niebuhr's approach to social ethics, based as it is on a version of natural law, is of greater appeal. That (...)
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  4. David Novak (2011). The Image of the Non-Jew in Judaism: The Idea of Noahide Law. The Littman Library of Jewish Civilization.
     
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  5. David Novak (2009). Covenantal Rights: A Study in Jewish Political Theory. Princeton University Press.
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  6. David Novak (2008). Tradition in the Public Square: A David Novak Reader. William B. Eerdmans Pub. Co..
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  7. David Novak (2008). Talmud jako źródło dla filozoficznego namysłu. Studia Philosophica Wratislaviensia:97-112.
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  8. David Novak (2008). The Universality of Jewish Ethics: A Rejoinder to Secularist Critics. Journal of Religious Ethics 36 (2):181-211.
    Jewish ethics like Judaism itself has often been charged with being "particularistic," and in modernity it has been unfavorably compared with the universality of secular ethics. This charge has become acute philosophically when the comparison is made with the ethics of Kant. However, at this level, much of the ethical rejection of Jewish particularism, especially its being beholden to a God who is above the universe to whom this God prescribes moral norms and judges according to them, is also a (...)
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  9. David Novak (2005). Jurisprudence. In Kenneth Seeskin (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Maimonides. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  10. David Novak (2004). Is Natural Law a Border Concept Between Judaism and Christianity? Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (2):237-254.
    With the passing of disputations between Jewish and Christian thinkers as to whose tradition has a more universal ethics, the task of Jewish and Christian ethicists is to constitute a universal horizon for their respective bodies of ethics, both of which are essentially particularistic being rooted in special revelation. This parallel project must avoid relativism that is essentially anti-ethical, and triumphalism that proposes an imperialist ethos. A retrieval of the idea of natural law in each respective tradition enables the constitution (...)
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  11. David Novak (2003). A Jewish Argument for Socialized Medicine. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):313-328.
    : An analysis of traditional Jewish texts yields neither the capitalist notion of medicine nor the socialist one. Neither alternative is sufficient to ground the respect for the sanctity of the human person as a being created in the image of God that is so rationally appealing. That is why the Jewish ethical tradition, which is based on this respect for the sanctity of human personhood, both individual and collective, is so attractive—if only for its insights, rather than its authority; (...)
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  12. David Novak (2002). Bodéüs, Richard. Aristotle and the Theology of the Living Immortals. Review of Metaphysics 55 (3):620-622.
  13. David Novak (2002). Why the Jews Need Dabru Emet. Dialogue and Universalism 12 (4-5):133-144.
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  14. David Novak (2001). Clay, Diskin. Platonic Questions: Dialogues with the Silent Philosopher. Review of Metaphysics 55 (2):382-384.
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  15. David Novak (2000). Avoiding Charges of Legalism and Antinomianism in Jewish‐Christian Dialogue. Modern Theology 16 (3):275-291.
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  16. David Novak (1999). Ethics of Responsibility. International Studies in Philosophy 31 (4):145-146.
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  17. David Novak (1998). Natural Law in Judaism. Cambridge University Press.
    This book breaks new ground in the study of Judaism, in philosophy, and in comparative ethics. It demonstrates that the assumption that Judaism has no natural law theory to speak of, held by the vast majority of scholars, is simply wrong. The book shows how natural law theory, using a variety of different terms for itself throughout the ages, has been a constant element in Jewish thought. The book sorts out the varieties of Jewish natural law theory, illuminating their strengths (...)
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  18. David Novak (1997). Kaufman, William E. John Wild: From Realism to Phenomenology. Review of Metaphysics 50 (3):668-669.
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  19. David Novak (1997). Spinoza and the Doctrine of the Election of Israel. Studia Spinozana: An International and Interdisciplinary Series 13:81-99.
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  20. Norbert M. le GoodmanSamuelson, Kenneth Seeskin, David Novak, Ehud Z. Benor, Menachem Kellner, Eric Lawee, Michael Zank, Michael L. Morgan & Avihu Zakai (1996). Brill Online Books and Journals. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 5 (2).
     
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  21. David Novak (1996). Jewish Ethics and Natural Law. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 5 (2):205-217.
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  22. David Novak (1995). B. Jewish Perspectives on Sex and Family. In Elliot N. Dorff & Louis E. Newman (eds.), Contemporary Jewish Ethics and Morality: A Reader. Oxford University Press. 271.
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  23. David Novak (1995). Response to Michael Wyschogrod. Modern Theology 11 (2):211-218.
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  24. David Novak (1992). Jewish Social Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Leading contemporary Jewish thinker David Novak has here compiled ten of his essays on a variety of issues in Jewish ethics. Drawing constantly on classical Jewish tradition, Novak also looks at a wide range of modern critical scholarship on the ancient sources. He aims to point out certain common features of Jewish and Christian ethics and the normative implications of this overlapping of traditions; he assumes the reality of a "Judeo-Christian ethic," while refusing to minimize the doctrinal differences between the (...)
     
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  25. David Novak (1990). Bioethics and the Contemporary Jewish Community. Hastings Center Report 20 (4):14-17.
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  26. David Novak (1989). Jewish-Christian Dialogue: A Jewish Justification. Oxford University Press.
    Many studies written about the Jewish-Christian relationship are primarily historical overviews that focus on the Jewish background of Christianity, the separation of Christianity from Judiasm, or the medieval disputations between the two faiths. This book is one of the first studies to examine the relationship from a philosophical and theological viewpoint. Carefully drawing on Jewish classical sources, Novak argues that there is actual justification for the new relationship between Judaism and Christianity from within Jewish religious tradition. He demonstrates that this (...)
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  27. David Novak (1979). Judaism and Contemporary Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 4 (4):347-366.
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  28. David Novak (1974). Law and Theology in Judaism. New York,Ktav Pub. House.
     
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