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Profile: David W.D. Owen (University of Arizona)
Profile: David S. Owen (University of Louisville)
  1. David Owen, Scepticism with Regard to Reason.
    Until recently, philosophical scholarship has not been kind to Hume’s arguments in “Of scepticism with regard to reason” (A Treatise of Human Nature, 1.4.1). [1] Reid gives the negative arguments a pretty rough ride, though in the end he agrees with Hume’s conclusion that reason cannot be defended by reason.[2] Stove’s comment that the argument is “not merely defective, but one of the worst arguments ever to impose itself on a man of genius” (Stove 1973), while extreme, is not untypical. (...)
     
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  2. David Owen (forthcoming). H. Aram Veeser (Ed.), The New Historicism, London: Routledge, 1989.£ 30.00, Paper£ 10.95, Xvi+ 318 Pp. Hayden White, The Content of the Form: Narrative Discourse and Historical Representation, Baltimore, Md: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987, $18.80, Xiii+ 244 Pp. [REVIEW] History of the Human Sciences.
     
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  3. David Owen (forthcoming). Machiavelli’s Il Principe and the Politics of Glory. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885114567346.
    This article offers a reading of Machiavelli’s il Principe and its relationship to his Discorsi which defends, first, the coherence of Machiavelli’s appeal to the figure of the one-man ordinatore and, second, a republican interpretation of il Principe. Its particular focus is on the pivotal role played in Machiavelli’s text-act by ‘love of worldly glory’. It is argued, first, that it is through love of glory that Machiavelli can coherently aim to produce an effective one-man ordinatore and, second, that the (...)
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  4. David Owen (forthcoming). Reasons and Practices of Reasoning: On the Analytic/Continental Distinction in Political Philosophy. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885115587120.
    This essay argues that whereas ‘analytic’ political philosophy is focussed on generating reasons that are oriented to the issue of articulating norms of justice, legitimacy and so on, that guide political judgements about institutions and/or forms of conduct; ‘Continental’ political philosophy is oriented to critically assessing the practices of reasoning that characterise our social and political institutions and forms of conduct as well as our first-order normative reflection on them. It explores the distinction between the two orientations in terms of, (...)
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  5. David Owen & Graham Smith (2015). Survey Article: Deliberation, Democracy, and the Systemic Turn. Journal of Political Philosophy 23 (2):213-234.
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  6. Rebecca Aanerud, Barbara Applebaum, Alison Bailey, Steve Garner, Robin James, Crista Lebens, Steve Martinot, Nancy McHugh, Bridget M. Newell, David S. Owen, Alexis Sartwell & Karen Teel (2014). White Self-Criticality Beyond Anti-Racism: How Does It Feel to Be a White Problem? Lexington Books.
    George Yancy gathers white scholarship that dwells on the experience of whiteness as a problem without sidestepping the question’s implications for Black people or people of color. This unprecedented reversion of the “Black problem” narrative challenges contemporary rhetoric of a color-evasive world in a critically engaging and persuasive study.
     
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  7. Mathew Humphrey, David Owen, Joe Hoover, Clare Woodford, Alan Finlayson, Marc Stears & Bonnie Honig (2014). Humanism From an Agonistic Perspective: Themes From the Work of Bonnie Honig. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):168-217.
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  8. David Owen (2014). Republicanism and the Constitution of Migrant Statuses. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 17 (1):90-110.
    This paper addresses republican conditions of legitimacy for the constitution of the civic statuses of migrants. It identifies two legitimacy tests to which any civic status is subject, namely, that it does not make its bearers more vulnerable to the arbitrary exercise of private or public power and that the constitution of the person as bearer of this status is not itself the product of an arbitrary exercise of public power . It is argued that R1 puts significant constraints on (...)
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  9. David Owen (2013). Activist Political Theory and the Question of Power. Ethics and Global Politics 6 (2):85-91.
    Global Justice and Avant-Garde Political Agency is, first and foremost, a manifesto for an approach to political philosophy*what Ypi calls ‘activist political theory’*and can, I think, be best understood as an attempt to disturb analytic political philosophy from its ‘dogmatic slumber’ and motivate its movement towards the tradition of critical theory. In the first section of this commentary, I will lay out the grounds for this view. Having thus sketched an account of the point and purpose of this text, I (...)
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  10. David Owen (2013). Citizenship and the Marginalities of Migrants. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (3):326-343.
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  11. Simon Robertson & David Owen (2013). Historical Relations: Nietzsche and the Greeks / Jessica N. Berry ; Nietzsche and Romanticism : Goethe, Holderlin, and Wagner / Adrian Del Caro ; Nietzsche the Kantian? / Tom Bailey ; Schopenhauer as Nietzsche's "Great Teacher" and "Antipode" / Ivan Soll ; Influence on Analytic Philosophy. In Ken Gemes & John Richardson (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Nietzsche. Oup Oxford.
     
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  12. Simon Robertson & David Owen, Influence on Analytic Philosophy.
  13. David Owen (2012). Constituting the Polity, Constituting the Demos: On the Place of the All Affected Interests Principle in Democratic Theory and in Resolving the Democratic Boundary Problem. Ethics and Global Politics 5 (3):129-152.
    This essay considers the role of the ‘all affected interests’ principle in democratic theory, focusing on debates concerning its form, substance and relationship to the resolution of the democratic boundary problem. It begins by defending an ‘all actually affected’ formulation of the principle against Goodin’s ‘incoherence argument’ critique of this formulation, before addressing issues concerning how to specify the choice set appropriate to the principle. Turning to the substance of the principle, the argument rejects Nozick’s dismissal of its intuitive appeal (...)
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  14. David Owen (2012). Scales of Justice: Reimagining Political Space in a Globalizing World by Nancy Fraser. Constellations 19 (1):135-139.
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  15. David Owen (2012). Symposium on Ripstein's Force and Freedom: Introduction. European Journal of Philosophy 20 (3):447-449.
    This introduction provides a very brief sketch of the fundamental claims of Arthur Ripstein's Force and Freedom before locating the criticisms of his interlocutors in relation to those claims. Valentini and Sangiovanni are situated as critics of the Kantian frame, while Ronzoni and Williams are critics situated within that frame.
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  16. David Owen (2012). Tully, Foucault and Agnostic Struggles Over Recognition. In Miriam Bankovsky & Alice Le Goff (eds.), Recognition Theory and Contemporary French Moral and Political Philosophy: Reopening the Dialogue. Distributed Exclusively in the Usa by Palgrave Macmillan.
     
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  17. David Owen & Clare Woodford (2012). Foucault, Cavell and the Government of Self and Others. On Truth-Telling, Friendship and an Ethics of Democracy. Iride 25 (2):299-316.
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  18. David Owen (2011). Must the Tolerant Person Have a Sense of Humour? On the Structure of Tolerance as a Virtue. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (3):385-403.
    This article addresses the relationship of toleration and humour as virtues. It argues that our understanding of toleration as a virtue has been captured and shaped by the conception of tolerance as a duty and, through a critique of John Horton?s classic article on toleration as a virtue, seeks to show what a view freed from such captivity would look like. It then turns to argue that humour plays a fundamental role in relation to living a virtuous life. Finally, it (...)
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  19. David Owen (2011). Transnational Citizenship and the Democratic State: Modes of Membership and Voting Rights. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 14 (5):641-663.
    This article addresses two central topics in normative debates on transnational citizenship: the inclusion of resident non-citizens and of non-resident citizens within the demos. Through a critical review of the social membership (Carens, Rubio-Marin) and stakeholder (Baubock) principles, it identifies two problems within these debates. The first is the antinomy of incorporation, namely, the point that there are compelling arguments both for the mandatory naturalization of permanent residents and for making naturalization a voluntary process. The second is the arbitrary demos (...)
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  20. David Owen (2010). Die verlorene und die wiedergefundene Wirklichkeit. Ethik, Politik und Imagination bei Raymond Geuss. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 58 (3):431-443.
    This essay argues that realism in ethics and in politics is best understood as a discipline of mind directed against wishful thinking. Reading Geuss in this context, against the background of the work of Bernard Williams, allows us to specify what is of value in his work as well as to illustrate the limitations – of argument and of tone – of that work. More specifically, it is argued that while the fairly catholic character of Geuss′s realism is a strength, (...)
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  21. David Owen (2010). Review of Axel Honneth, Pathologies of Reason: On the Legacy of Critical Theory. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (10).
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  22. David A. Owen (2010). Like No Other Place: The Sandhills of Nebraska. Center for American Places.
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  23. Nathan Brown, Nina Power, Harriet Evans, David Owen & Jeremy Gilbert (2009). Reviews. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 154.
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  24. David Owen (2009). Bernard Reginster, The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on Overcoming Nihilism (Pp. 598-602). In Ethics.
     
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  25. David Owen (2009). Autonomy, Self-Respect, and Self-Love: Nietzsche on Ethical Agency. In Ken Gemes & Simon May (eds.), Nietzsche on Freedom and Autonomy. Oxford University Press. 197.
  26. David Owen (2009). Book Reviews:The Affirmation of Life: Nietzsche on Overcoming Nihilism. [REVIEW] Ethics 119 (3):598-602.
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  27. David Owen (2009). Hume and the Mechanics of Mind : Impressions, Ideas, and Association. In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Anne Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. Cambridge University Press.
    Hume introduced important innovations concerning the theory of ideas. The two most important are the distinction between impressions and ideas, and the use he made of the principles of association in explaining mental phenomena. Hume divided the perceptions of the mind into two classes. The members of one class, impressions, he held to have a greater degree of force and vivacity than the members of the other class, ideas. He also supposed that ideas are causally dependent copies of impressions. And, (...)
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  28. David Owen (2009). Philosophy and Real Politics. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 154.
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  29. David Owen (2009). Raymond Geuss, Philosophy and Real Politics. Radical Philosophy 154:59.
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  30. Paul Hoffman, David Owen & Gideon Yaffe (eds.) (2008). Contemporary Perspectives on Early Modern Philosophy: Essays in Honor of Vere Chappell. Broadview Press.
    The essays in this collection are all studies in the history of modern philosophy. Together they provide a cross-section of current efforts to reconstruct ...
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  31. David Owen (2008). Nietzsche's Genealogy Revisited. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 35 (1):141-154.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a preview of the article: This essay begins by reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of the developmental strategy adopted in my Nietzsche’s “Genealogy of Morality” in relation to the contrasting approaches of Conway, Hatab, and Janaway in their studies of Nietzsche’s On the Genealogy of Morals. It then turns to take up a topic that, in the light of the readings of Conway, Hatab, Janaway, and myself, I now take to be much more (...)
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  32. David Owen (2008). Recognition, Reification and Value. Constellations 15 (4):576-586.
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  33. David Owen (2008). The Expressive Agon : On Political Agency in a Constitutional Democracy. In Andrew Schaap (ed.), Law and Agonistic Politics. Ashgate Pub. Company.
     
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  34. David Owen (2007). Locke on Judgment. In Lex Newman (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Locke's "Essay Concerning Human Understanding". Cambridge University Press.
    Locke usually uses the term “judgment” in a rather narrow but not unusual sense, as referring to the faculty that produces probable opinion or assent.2 His account is explicitly developed in analogy with knowledge, and like knowledge, it is developed in terms of the relation various ideas bear to one another. Whereas knowledge is the perception of the agreement or disagreement of any of our ideas, judgment is the presumption of their agreement or disagreement. Intuitive knowledge is the immediate perception (...)
     
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  35. David Owen (2007). Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morality. McGill-Queen's University Press/Acumen.
    Combining philosophical acuity, psychological insight and a remarkably powerful prose style, On the Genealogy of Morality is a dazzling and brilliantly incisive attack on European morality. David Owen situates the Genealogy in the context of the development of Nietzsche's philosophy and offers readers a sophisticated and nuanced analysis of this great text. He provides a lucid account of Nietzsche’s reasons for adopting a “genealogical” investigation of our moral values as well as a detailed analysis of the Genealogy itself. Highlighting the (...)
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  36. David S. Owen (2007). Towards a Critical Theory of Whiteness. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (2):203-222.
    In this article I argue that a critical theory of whiteness is necessary, though not sufficient, to the formulation of an adequate explanatory account of the mechanisms of racial oppression in the modern world. In order to explain how whiteness underwrites systems of racial oppression and how it is reproduced, the central functional properties of whiteness are identified. I propose that understanding whiteness as a structuring property of racialized social systems best explains these functional properties. Given the variety of conceptions (...)
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  37. David S. Owen (2007). Whiteness in DuBois's-The Souls of Black Folk. Philosophia Africana 10 (2):107-126.
  38. Bert van den Brink & David Owen (eds.) (2007). Recognition and Power: Axel Honneth and the Tradition of Critical Social Theory. Cambridge University Press.
    The topic of recognition has come to occupy a central place in contemporary debates in social and political theory. Rooted in Hegel's work, developed by George Herbert Mead and Charles Taylor, it has been given renewed expression in the recent program for Critical Theory developed by Axel Honneth in his book The Struggle for Recognition. Honneth's research program offers an empirically insightful way of reflecting on emancipatory struggles for greater justice and a powerful theoretical tool for generating a conception of (...)
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  39. David Owen (2006). Perfectionism, Parrhesia, and the Care of the Self : Foucault and Cavell on Ethics and Politics. In Andrew John Norris (ed.), The Claim to Community: Essays on Stanley Cavell and Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
  40. David Owen (2006). Tasmanian Tiger: The Tragic Tale of How the World Lost Its Most Mysterious Predator. Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):411-412.
     
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  41. Keith Ansell Pearson, Babette Babich, Eric Blondel, Daniel Conway, Ken Gemes, Jürgen Habermas, Salim Kemal, Paul S. Loeb, Mark Migotti, Wolfgang Müller-Lauter, Alexander Nehamas, David Owen, Robert Pippin, Aaron Ridley, Gary Shapiro, Alan Schrift, Tracy Strong, Christine Swanton & Yirmiyahu Yovel (2006). Nietzsche's on the Genealogy of Morals: Critical Essays. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    In this astonishingly rich volume, experts in ethics, epistemology, philosophy of mind, political theory, aesthetics, history, critical theory, and hermeneutics bring to light the best philosophical scholarship on what is arguably Nietzsche's most rewarding but most challenging text. Including essays that were commissioned specifically for the volume as well as essays revised and edited by their authors, this collection showcases definitive works that have shaped Nietzsche studies alongside new works of interest to students and experts alike. A lengthy introduction, annotated (...)
     
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  42. David Owen (2005). On Failing to Be Agents: Freedom, Servitude, and the Concept of “the Weak” in Nietzsche's Practical Philosophy. Philosophical Topics 33 (2):139-159.
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  43. David Owen (2005). Review: On Genealogy and Political Theory. [REVIEW] Political Theory 33 (1):110 - 120.
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  44. David S. Owen (2005). Critical Theory and Learning From History. Radical Philosophy Review 8 (2):187-195.
    In this paper I utilize Martin Beck Matuštík’s intellectual biography of Habermas as a means for reflecting on the meaning that criticaltheory has for us in the wake of September 11. I argue that the significant contribution of Matuštík’s book is that it fruitfully continues theconversation about the meaning of critical theory by underscoring the sociohistorical contexts that frame Habermas’s intellectual engagements. Matuštík’s figure of the critical theorist as witness refocuses attention on the critical theorist in context, nevertheless as critical (...)
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  45. David Owen (2004). Democracy and the Foreigner. Theory and Event 7 (3).
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  46. David Owen (2004). Stability and Justification in Hume's Treatise. International Philosophical Quarterly 44 (2):271-273.
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  47. David Owen (2003). Editorial Foreword. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 26 (1):3-3.
    The present stage in the development of our society is marked by serious changes in social morality. The building of communism is entering a new stage. The man of the communist future is taking shape and being perfected before our eyes. Under these conditions, the Party - and this was emphasized at its Twenty-Fourth Congress - requires of a worker in the arts a thorough examination of contemporary life and of its hero to the full extent of his talent, and (...)
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  48. David Owen, Genealogy as Perspicuous Representation.
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  49. David Owen (2003). Locke and Hume on Belief, Judgment and Assent. Topoi 22 (1):15-28.
    Hume's account of belief has been much reviled, especially considered as an account of what it is to assent to or judge a proposition to be true. In fact, given that he thinks that thoughts about existence can be composed of a single idea, and that relations are just complex ideas, it might be wondered whether he has an account of judgment at all. Nonetheless, Hume was extremely proud of his account of belief, discussing it at length in the Abstract, (...)
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  50. David Owen (2003). Nietzsche's Event: Genealogy and the Death of God. Theory and Event 6 (3).
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