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  1. David Pesetsky, Andrew Nevins & Cilene Rodrigues, Pirahã Exceptionality: A Reassessment.
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  2. David Pesetsky, Cyclic Linearization of Syntactic Structure.
    This paper proposes an architecture for the mapping between syntax and phonology — in particular, that aspect of phonology that determines ordering. In Fox and Pesetsky (in prep.), we will argue that this architecture, when combined with a general theory of syntactic domains ("phases"), provides a new understanding of a variety of phenomena that have received diverse accounts in the literature. This shorter paper focuses on two processes, both drawn from Scandinavian: the familiar process of Object Shift and the less (...)
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  3. David Pesetsky, Comments on Object Shift and Cyclic Linearization.
    In this short review I address certain issues and predictions that arise from the position papers by Erteschik- Shir, and by Fox and Pesetsky. The two proposed analyses are radically different, so I have made no attempt to relate them in terms of their properties. In section 1 I discuss some underlying issues in the architecture of grammar assumed by Erteschik-Shir, and in section 2 I evaluate some of the predictions generated by Fox and Pesetsky’s approach. In section 3 I (...)
     
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  4. David Pesetsky, How Phonological is Object Shift?
    Mainstream work tends to hold that syntax is blind to phonological content, with certain exceptions, for example sometimes phonetically null elements require special syntactic licensing (Chomsky 1981), or certain syntactic rules only apply to nodes with phonetically visible features (Holmberg 2001). Basically falling within the mainstream are proposals that syntactic movement can be blocked by or driven by requirements that have phonological effect at the output, such as adjacency (Bobaljik 1995, Kidwai 1999) or rules matching prosodic structure with focus structure (...)
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  5. David Pesetsky, Linguistics and Learning to Read.
    For centuries, linguists have been examining how languages are put together. This investigation is possible because human languages are overwhelmingly orderly and law-governed. But the investigation is also exciting, because of a remarkable fact emerging from recent work: though languages differ in many ways, they are all cast from a common mold -- a "master plan" rooted in human biology. Linguists interested in this discovery try to determine exactly what this master plan is, and how it is reflected in the (...)
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  6. David Pesetsky, Phrasal Movement and its Kin.
    The investigations reported here are the result of three lucky events. The first occurred in 1986. I had recently done the work reported in Pesetsky (1987), and received in the mail a copy of Kiss (1986). Since I had argued at length that D-linked wh-phrases do not display Superiority effects. I was astonished by a paradigm reported by Kiss, which appears here as example (98). These facts remained stubbornly in my mind for the next decade as an unsolved puzzle. Kiss (...)
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  7. David Pesetsky, The Battle for Language: From Syntax to Phonics.
    tongues with the utmost fluency. Any and every Japanese child — all speak Japanese without difficulty. Does that not show a startling talent? How, by what means, does..
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  8. David Pesetsky, The Syntax of Valuation and the Interpretability of Features1 October 10, 2004.
    The features of lexical items interact through agreement to influence the shape of syntactic structure and the process of semantic interpretation. We can often tell from the form of a construction that agreement has taken place: the value of a particular feature is morphologically represented on more than one lexical item, even though semantic interpretation may be lacking on some of these lexical items. Less obvious is the nature of the process that yields agreement in the first place. Less obvious (...)
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  9. David Pesetsky (2009). Against Taking Linguistic Diversity at “Face Value”. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):464.
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  10. David Pesetsky & Ned Block (1990). Complexity and Adaptation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):750-752.
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