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  1. David R. Lea (2011). The Managerial University and the Decline of Modern Thought. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (8):816-837.
    In this paper I discuss the managerial template that has become the normative model for the organization of the university. In the first part of the paper I explain the corporatization of academic life in terms of the functional relationships that make up the organizational components of the commercial enterprise and their inappropriateness for the life of the academy. Although there is at present a significant body of literature devoted to this issue, the goal of this paper is to explain (...)
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  2. David R. Lea (2008). A Historical Perspective on Ownership as Seen Through the Philosophies of Kant and Hegel. The European Legacy 2 (6):977-990.
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  3. David R. Lea (1998). Aboriginal Entitlement and Conservative Theory. Journal of Applied Philosophy 15 (1):1–14.
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  4. David R. Lea (1997). Do Communitarian Values Justify Papua New Guinean and/or Fijian Systems of Land Tenure? Agriculture and Human Values 14 (2):115-126.
    Communitarians have alleged a connection between according specialrights to community groupings and preserving the indigenous cultureand the social cohesion of the original community. This paperconcentrates upon special group rights associated with land tenurenow maintained by Fijian Mataqali and traditional land owninggroups in Papua New Guinea. The first section of the paper assessesand compares the social consequences of each of these systems withspecial attention to the preservation of traditional culture.However, in the case of Fiji, it is undeniable that the mataqaliland tenure (...)
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  5. David R. Lea (1994). Lockean Property Rights, Tully's Community Ownership, and Melanesian Customary Communal Ownership. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (1):117-132.
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  6. David R. Lea (1994). A Jurisprudential Assessment of Nozick's Natural Right to Property with Reference to Melanesian Customary Rights. Sophia 33 (2):48-62.
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  7. David R. Lea (1994). Christianity and Western Attitudes Towards the Natural Environment. History of European Ideas 18 (4):513-524.
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  8. David R. Lea (1993). Melanesian Axiology, Communal Land Tenure, and the Prospect of Sustainable Development Within Papua New Guinea. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 6 (1):89-101.
    It is the contention of this paper that some progress in alleviating the social and environmental problems which are beginning to face Papua New Guinea can be achieved by supporting traditional Melanesian values through maintaining the customary system of communal land tenure. In accordance with this aim, I will proceed to contrast certain Western attitudes towards individual freedom, selfinterested behaviour, individual and communal interests and private ownership with attitudes and values expressed in the traditional Melanesian approach. In order to demonstrate (...)
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  9. David R. Lea (1993). The Environmental Implications of Post Renaissance Christianity. Agriculture and Human Values 10 (4):50-57.
    Recently there has been considerable controversy over the environmental impact of Christian teaching. During the beginnings of our increased awareness of the ecological crisis, several strong papers appeared condemning Christianity for encouraging environmental exploitation. Recently a number of works have sought to defend the Judeo-Christian tradition by emphasizing different aspects of a message that allegedly promotes environmentally friendly behavior. Overall, however, these interpretations exhibit doubtful ontic significance. It is the contention of this paper that Christianity evolved profoundly after the Renaissance (...)
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