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Profile: David R. Morrow (University of Alabama, Birmingham)
  1. Moti Mizrahi & David R. Morrow (2014). Does Conceivability Entail Metaphysical Possibility? Ratio 26 (4).
    In this paper, we argue that ‘Weak Modal Rationalism’, which is the view that ideal primary positive conceivability entails primary metaphysical possibility, is self-defeating. To this end, we outline two reductio arguments against ‘Weak Modal Rationalism’. The first reductio shows that, from supposing that ‘Weak Modal Rationalism’ is true, it follows that conceivability both is and is not conclusive evidence for possibility. The second reductio shows that, from supposing that ‘Weak Modal Rationalism’ is true, it follows that it is possible (...)
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  2. David R. Morrow (2014). Starting a Flood to Stop a Fire? Some Moral Constraints on Solar Radiation Management. Ethics, Policy and Environment 17 (2):123-138.
    (2014). Starting a Flood to Stop a Fire? Some Moral Constraints on Solar Radiation Management. Ethics, Policy & Environment: Vol. 17, No. 2, pp. 123-138. doi: 10.1080/21550085.2014.926056.
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  3. David R. Morrow (2014). Why Geoengineering is a Public Good, Even If It is Bad. Climatic Change.
    Stephen Gardiner argues that geoengineering does not meet the “canonical technical definition” of a global public good, and that it is misleading to frame geoengineering as a public good. A public good is something that is nonrival and nonexcludable. Contrary to Gardiner’s claims, geoengineering meets both of these criteria. Framing geoengineering as a public good is useful because it allows commentators to draw on the existing economic, philosophical, and social scientific literature on the governance of public goods.
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  4. David R. Morrow (2013). When Technologies Make Good People Do Bad Things: Another Argument Against the Value-Neutrality of Technologies. Science and Engineering Ethics (2):1-15.
    Although many scientists and engineers insist that technologies are value-neutral, philosophers of technology have long argued that they are wrong. In this paper, I introduce a new argument against the claim that technologies are value-neutral. This argument complements and extends, rather than replaces, existing arguments against value-neutrality. I formulate the Value-Neutrality Thesis, roughly, as the claim that a technological innovation can have bad effects, on balance, only if its users have “vicious” or condemnable preferences. After sketching a microeconomic model for (...)
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  5. David R. Morrow, Robert E. Kopp & Michael Oppenheimer (2013). Political Legitimacy in Decisions About Experiments in Solar Radiation Management. In William C. G. Burns & Andrew Strauss (eds.), Climate Change Geoengineering: Philosophical Perspectives, Legal Issues, and Governance Frameworks. Cambridge University Press.
    Some types of solar radiation management (SRM) research are ethically problematic because they expose persons, animals, and ecosystems to significant risks. In our earlier work, we argued for ethical norms for SRM research based on norms for biomedical research. Biomedical researchers may not conduct research on persons without their consent, but universal consent is impractical for SRM research. We argue that instead of requiring universal consent, ethical norms for SRM research require only political legitimacy in decision-making about global SRM trials. (...)
     
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  6. David R. Morrow & Chris Alen Sula (2011). Naturalized Metaphilosophy. Synthese 182 (2):297-313.
    Traditional representations of philosophy have tended to prize the role of reason in the discipline. These accounts focus exclusively on ideas and arguments as animating forces in the field. But anecdotal evidence and more rigorous sociological studies suggest there is more going on in philosophy. In this article, we present two hypotheses about social factors in the field: that social factors influence the development of philosophy, and that status and reputation—and thus social influence—will tend to be awarded to philosophers who (...)
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  7. David R. Morrow, Robert E. Kopp & Michael Oppenheimer (2009). Toward Ethical Norms and Institutions for Climate Engineering Research. Environmental Research Letters 4.
    Climate engineering (CE), the intentional modification of the climate in order to reduce the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, is sometimes touted as a potential response to climate change. Increasing interest in the topic has led to proposals for empirical tests of hypothesized CE techniques, which raise serious ethical concerns. We propose three ethical guidelines for CE researchers, derived from the ethics literature on research with human and animal subjects, applicable in the event that CE research progresses beyond computer (...)
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