Search results for 'David S. Pacini' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  16
    Thomas Frangenberg & Ludovico David (1994). The Geometry of a Dome: Ludovico David 's Dichiarazione Della Pittura Della Capella Del Collegio Clementino di Roma. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 57:191-208.
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  2.  15
    David S. Pacini (2009). Review of David Walsh, The Modern Philosophical Revolution: The Luminosity of Existence. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (9).
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  3.  12
    David S. Pacini (2008). Through Narcissus' Glass Darkly: The Modern Religion of Conscience. Fordham University Press.
    Through Narcissus' Glass Darkly presents a genealogy and critique of the ideal of conscience in modern philosophical theology, particularly in the writings of ...
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  4.  3
    D. R. Oldroyd & G. McKenna (1995). A Note on Andrew Ramsay's Unpublished Report on the St David's Area, Recently Discovered. Annals of Science 52 (2):193-196.
    Notice is given of the discovery of two reports and an accompanying manuscript map by Andrew Ramsay, on the geology of the St David's area, Pembrokeshire. This adds to previously published information on early geological work in this important region: Ramsay's report throw some light on his attitude towards Murchison's ideas on Welsh stratigraphy. The map is the earliest known version of the Survey's St David's sheet.
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  5. D. R. Oldroyd (1991). The Archaean Controversy in Britain: Part I—The Rocks of St David'S. Annals of Science 48 (5):407-452.
    Early geological investigations in the St David's area are described, particularly the work of Murchison. In a reconnaissance survey in 1835, he regarded a ridge of rocks at St David's as intrusive in unfossiliferous Cambrian; and the early Survey mapping was conducted on that assumption, leading to the publication of maps in 1845 and 1857. The latter represented the margins of the St David's ridge as ‘Altered Cambrian’. So the supposedly intrusive ‘syenite’ was regarded as younger, and (...)
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  6.  14
    Graham Oppy (2002). The Tristram Shandy Paradox: A Response to David S. Oderberg. Philosophia Christi 4 (2):335-350.
    This paper is a response to David Oderberg's discussion of the Tristram Shandy paradox. I defend the claim that the Tristram Shandy paradox does not support the claim that it is impossible that the past is infinite.
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  7. Anthony Skelton (2013). Sidgwick’s Argument for Utilitarianism and His Moral Epistemology: A Reply to David Phillips. Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.
    David Phillips’s Sidgwickian Ethics is a penetrating contribution to the scholarly and philosophical understanding of Henry Sidgwick’s The Methods of Ethics. This note focuses on Phillips’s understanding of (aspects of) Sidgwick’s argument for utilitarianism and the moral epistemology to which he subscribes. In § I, I briefly outline the basic features of the argument that Sidgwick provides for utilitarianism, noting some disagreements with Phillips along the way. In § II, I raise some objections to Phillips’s account of the epistemology (...)
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  8. Katalin Balog (2000). Phenomenal Judgment and the HOT Theory: Comments on David Rosenthal’s “Consciousness, Content, and Metacognitive Judgments”. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):215-219.
    In this commentary I criticize David Rosenthal’s higher order thought theory of consciousness . This is one of the best articulated philosophical accounts of consciousness available. The theory is, roughly, that a mental state is conscious in virtue of there being another mental state, namely, a thought to the effect that one is in the first state. I argue that this account is open to the objection that it makes “HOT-zombies” possible, i.e., creatures that token higher order mental states, (...)
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  9. Gail Fine (2010). Signification, Essence, and Meno's Paradox: A Reply to David Charles's 'Types of Definition in the Meno'. Phronesis 55 (2):125-152.
    According to David Charles, in the Meno Socrates fleetingly distinguishes the signification from the essence question, but, in the end, he conflates them. Doing so, Charles thinks, both leads to Meno's paradox and prevents Socrates from answering it satisfactorily. I argue that Socrates doesn't conflate the two questions, and that his reply to Meno's paradox is more satisfactory than Charles allows.
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  10.  77
    Barry Maguire (2013). Defending David Lewis's Modal Reduction. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):129-147.
    David Lewis claims that his theory of modality successfully reduces modal items to nonmodal items. This essay will clarify this claim and argue that it is true. This is largely an exercise within ‘Ludovician Polycosmology’: I hope to show that a certain intuitive resistance to the reduction and a set of related objections misunderstand the nature of the Ludovician project. But these results are of broad interest since they show that would-be reductionists have more formidable argumentative resources than is (...)
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  11.  18
    Christian Forstner (2008). The Early History of David Bohm's Quantum Mechanics Through the Perspective of Ludwik Fleck's Thought-Collectives. Minerva 46 (2):215-229.
    This paper analyses the early history of David Bohm’s mechanics from the perspective of Ludwik Fleck’s thought-collectives and shows how the thought-style of the scientific community limits the possible modes of thinking and what new possibilities for the construction of a new theory arise if these limits are removed.
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  12.  32
    Mark Hanin (2012). Naturalistic Moral Realism and Moral Disagreement: David Copp's Account. Res Publica 18 (4):283-301.
    To enhance the plausibility of naturalistic moral realism, David Copp develops an argument from epistemic defeaters aiming to show that strongly a priori synthetic moral truths do not exist. In making a case for the non-naturalistic position, I locate Copp’s account within the wider literature on peer disagreement; I identify key points of divergence between Copp’s doctrine and conciliatorist doctrines; I introduce the notion of ‘minimal moral competence’; I contend that some plausible benchmarks for minimal moral competence are grounded (...)
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  13.  39
    Kieran Oberman (2013). Beyond Sectarianism? On David Miller's Theory of Human Rights. Res Publica 19 (3):275-283.
    In his most recent book, National Responsibility and Global Justice, David Miller presents an account of human rights grounded on the idea of basic human needs. Miller argues that his account can overcome what he regards as a central problem for human rights theory: the need to provide a ‘non-sectarian’ justification for human rights, one that does not rely on reasons that people from non-liberal societies should find objectionable. The list of human rights that Miller’s account generates is, however, (...)
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  14.  35
    Daniel von Wachter (2004). The Ontological Turn Misunderstood: How to Misunderstand David Armstrong’s Theory of Possibility. Metaphysica 5 (2):105-114.
    This article argues that there is a great divide between semantics and metaphysics. Much of what is called metaphysics today is still stuck in the linguistic turn. This is illustrated by showing how Fraser MacBride misunderstands David Armstrong's theory of modality.
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  15.  23
    Jamie Morgan (2016). Power, Property, the Law, and the Corporation – a Commentary on David Ellerman's Paper: 'The Labour Theory of Property and Marginal Productivity Theory'. Economic Thought 5 (1):37.
    The point of departure of David Ellerman's paper is that the role of labour in economics can be looked at in a fundamentally different way than has typically been the case. The paper's purpose is, therefore, oppositional. However, it cannot simply be dismissed. It is clearly articulated, well reasoned, and most importantly, thought provoking. It requires one to rethink how one conceives some basic issues in economics. As such, one does not need to be entirely convinced by the argument (...)
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  16. David Papineau (2004). David Lewis and Schrödinger's Cat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):153 – 169.
    In 'How Many Lives Has Schrödinger's Cat?' David Lewis argues that the Everettian no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is in a tangle when it comes to probabilities. This paper aims to show that the difficulties that Lewis raises are insubstantial. The Everettian metaphysics contains a coherent account of probability. Indeed it accounts for probability rather better than orthodox metaphysics does.
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  17.  85
    Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & David Papineau (2004). David Lewis and Schrödinger's Cat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):153 – 169.
    In 'How Many Lives Has Schrödinger's Cat?' David Lewis argues that the Everettian no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is in a tangle when it comes to probabilities. This paper aims to show that the difficulties that Lewis raises are insubstantial. The Everettian metaphysics contains a coherent account of probability. Indeed it accounts for probability rather better than orthodox metaphysics does.
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  18.  74
    David Papineau (2004). David Lewis and Schrödinger's Cat. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):153 – 169.
    In 'How Many Lives Has Schrödinger's Cat?' David Lewis argues that the Everettian no-collapse interpretation of quantum mechanics is in a tangle when it comes to probabilities. This paper aims to show that the difficulties that Lewis raises are insubstantial. The Everettian metaphysics contains a coherent account of probability. Indeed it accounts for probability rather better than orthodox metaphysics does.
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  19.  36
    David H. Fleming & William Brown (2011). Deterritorialisation and Schizoanalysis in David Fincher's Fight Club. Deleuze Studies 5 (2):275-299.
    Taking a schizoanalytic approach to audio-visual images, this article explores some of the radical potentia for deterritorialisation found within David Fincher's Fight Club (1999). The film's potential for deterritorialisation is initially located in an exploration of the film's form and content, which appear designed to interrogate and transcend a series of false binaries between mind and body, inside and outside, male and female. Paying attention to the construction of photorealistic digital spaces and composited images, we examine the actual (and (...)
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  20. David Hoekema (2008). There Are No Just Wars: David Rodin and Oliver O’Donovan’s Divergent Critiques of a Tradition. Ars Disputandi 8.
    Two recent monographs re-examine the central elements of the just war tradition and its contemporary applications. David Rodin’s War and Self-Defense analyzes, and rejects, the common doctrine that just war is an instance of national self-defense, in parallel with the right of individuals to protect themselves against violent attack. This derivation fails, and it cannot justify resort to war. In contrast, Oliver O’Donovan’s The Just War Revisited dismisses the notion that there are rules for just war and calls instead (...)
     
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  21. Barry Loewer (2004). David Lewis's Humean Theory of Objective Chance. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1115--25.
    The most important theories in fundamental physics, quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, posit objective probabilities or chances. As important as chance is there is little agreement about what it is. The usual “interpretations of probability” give very different accounts of chance and there is disagreement concerning which, if any, is capable of accounting for its role in physics. David Lewis has contributed enormously to improving this situation. In his classic paper “A Subjectivist's Guide to Objective Chance” he described a (...)
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  22. David S. Cunningham (2007). David Bentley Hart's The Beauty of the Infinite: Critical Responses. New Blackfriars 88 (1017):581-584.
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  23. Crawford L. Elder (2009). Real Essentialism • by David S. Oderberg. Analysis 69 (2):376-378.
    This book presents vigorous and wide-ranging arguments in defense of an Aristotelian metaphysical scheme along fairly orthodox Thomistic lines. The central claim is that the items that populate the world have real essences – natures that mind-independently define what each such item is. This Aristotelian essentialism, Oderberg begins by telling us, is a different doctrine from what has recently been called ‘essentialism’, and a more powerful one . For recent essentialism has treated a thing's essence as merely all those properties (...)
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  24.  14
    Moti Mizrahi (2015). Comment on David Kaspar's Intuitionism. Reason Papers 37 (2):26-35.
    In his book Intuitionism, David Kaspar is after the truth. That is to say, on his view, “philosophy is the search for the whole truth” (p. 7). Intuitionism, then, “reflects that standpoint” (p. 7). My comments are meant to reflect the same standpoint. More explicitly, my aim in these comments is to evaluate the arguments for intuitionism, as I understand them from reading Kaspar’s book. In what follows, I focus on three arguments in particular, which can be found in (...)
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  25.  14
    David Carrier (1988). Gavin Hamilton's Oath of Brutus and David's Oath of the Horatii. The Monist 71 (2):197-213.
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  26. Scott Soames (2014). David Lewis’s Place in Analytic Philosophy. In Analytic Philosophy in America: And Other Historical and Contemporary Essays. Princeton University Press 139-166.
    By the early 1970s, and continuing through 2001, David Lewis and Saul Kripke had taken over W.V.O. Quine’s leadership in metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of language, and philosophical logic in the English-speaking world. Quine, in turn, had inherited his position in the early 1950s from Rudolf Carnap, who had been the leading logical positivist -- first in Europe, and, after 1935, in America. A renegade positivist himself, Quine eschewed apriority, necessity, and analyticity, while (for a time) adopting a holistic version (...)
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  27.  12
    Bruce Kuklick (2006). Review: David S. Brown. Richard Hofstadter: An Intellectual Biography. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (4):574-577.
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  28.  16
    Reviewed by David M. Adams (2000). David S. Oderberg and Jacqueline A. Laing, Human Lives: Critical Essays on Consequentialist Bioethics. Ethics 110 (2).
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  29.  11
    David M. Adams (2000). David S. Oderberg and Jacqueline A. Laing, Human Lives: Critical Essays on Consequentialist Bioethics:Human Lives: Critical Essays on Consequentialist Bioethics. Ethics 110 (2):434-436.
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  30.  9
    S. L. Greenslade (1970). Augustine: City of God. With an English Translation. Vol. Iii (Books Vii–Xi): Translated by David S. Wiesen. Vol. Iv (Books Xii–Xv): Translated by Philip Levine. (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. Xii+571; X+581. London: Heinemann, 1968, 1966. Cloth, 25s. Net Each. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 20 (01):102-103.
  31.  6
    Andrew Howat (2010). Some Pragmatist Themes By David S. Clarke. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):143-149.
  32.  70
    John Henry (2015). David Leech: The Hammer of the Cartesians: Henry More’s Philosophy of Spirit and the Origins of Modern Atheism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 77 (3):267-271.
    Henry More (1614–1687), the most influential of the so-called Cambridge Platonists, and arguably the leading philosophically-inclined theologian in late seventeenth-century England, has come in for renewed attention lately. He was the subject of a detailed intellectual biography in 2003 by Robert Crocker, and in 2012 Jasper Reid published a philosophically penetrating and enlightening study of More’s metaphysics (Crocker 2003; Reid 2012). David Leech’s study of More’s idiosyncratic concept of immaterial spirit—and the role that it plays in his philosophy and (...)
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  33. Francis J. Beckwith (2006). Defending Abortion Philosophically: A Review of David Boonin's a Defense of Abortion. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (2):177 – 203.
    This article is a critical review of David Boonin's book, A Defense of Abortion (Cambridge University Press, 2002), a significant contribution to the literature on this subject and arguably the most important monograph on abortion published in the past twenty years. Boonin's defense of abortion consists almost exclusively of sophisticated critiques of a wide variety of pro-life arguments, including ones that are rarely defended by pro-life advocates. This article offers a brief presentation of the book's contents with extended assessments (...)
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  34.  2
    James Griesemer (2013). Integration of Approaches in David Wake’s Model-Taxon Research Platform for Evolutionary Morphology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (4):525-536.
    What gets integrated in integrative scientific practices has been a topic of much discussion. Traditional views focus on theories and explanations, with ideas of reduction and unification dominating the conversation. More recent ideas focus on disciplines, fields, or specialties; models, mechanisms, or methods; phenomena, problems. How integration works looks different on each of these views since the objects of integration are ontologically and epistemically various: statements, boundary conditions, practices, protocols, methods, variables, parameters, domains, laboratories, and questions all have their own (...)
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  35.  64
    Ingo Brigandt (2013). A Critique of David Chalmers' and Frank Jackson's Account of Concepts. ProtoSociology 30:63–88.
    David Chalmers and Frank Jackson have promoted a strong program of conceptual analysis, which accords a significant philosophical role to the a priori analysis of concepts. They found this methodological program on an account of concepts using two-dimensional semantics. This paper argues that Chalmers and Jackson’s account of concepts, and the related approach by David Braddon-Mitchell, is inadequate for natural kind concepts as found in biology. Two-dimensional semantics is metaphysically faulty as an account of the nature of concepts (...)
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  36.  45
    Michael Ridge (2003). Epistemology Moralized: David Hume's Practical Epistemology. Hume Studies 29 (2):165-204.
    - Peter Railton1 Railton's remark is accurate; contemporary philosophers almost invariably suppose that morality is more vulnerable than empirical science to scepticism. Yet David Hume apparently embraces an inversion of this twentieth century orthodoxy.2 In book I of the Treatise, he claims that the understanding, when it reflects upon itself, "entirely subverts itself" (T 1. 4.7.7; SBN 267) while, in contrast, in book III he claims that our moral faculty, when reflecting upon itself, acquires "new force" (T 3.3.6.3; SBN (...)
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  37. Nicholas Maxwell, Aim-Oriented Empiricism: David Miller's Critique. PhilSci Archive.
    For three decades I have expounded and defended aim-oriented empiricism, a view of science which, l claim, solves a number of problems in the philosophy of science and has important implications for science itself and, when generalized, for the whole of academic inquiry, and for our capacity to solve our current global problems. Despite these claims, the view has received scant attention from philosophers of science. Recently, however, David Miller has criticized the view. Miller’s criticisms are, however, not valid.
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  38.  19
    A. R. Riggs (1985). David Hume's Practical Economics. Hume Studies 11 (2):154-165.
    David hume rejected utopian experiments in government. He presented his own "idea of a perfect commonwealth," but his approach to political economy was practical and surprisingly modern. In nine essays on economics he argued that 1) national strength lies in productivity; 2) trade indirectly benefits the state by enriching all the people; 3) luxury, Economic growth and refinement in the arts are compatible; 4) the international flow of money should be encouraged; 5) rate of interest is a key to (...)
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  39.  45
    Mark F. Sharlow (forthcoming). Lewis's Modal Realism: A Reply to Naylor's "a Note on David Lewis's Realism About Possible Worlds". Analysis 48 (1):13-15.
    This note is a reply to margery bedford naylor's "a note on david lewis's realism about possible worlds" . naylor asks why, if we accept david lewis's argument for real possible worlds , we should not accept an analogous argument for impossible worlds. i argue that the latter argument is invalid on the modal realist account of possibility and thus has no force for an adherent of lewis.
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  40.  83
    Alexander R. Pruss (2001). The Cardinality Objection to David Lewis's Modal Realism. Philosophical Studies 104 (2):169-178.
    According to David Lewis's extreme modal realism, every waythat a world could be is a way that some concretely existingphysical world really is. But if the worlds are physicalentities, then there should be a set of all worlds, whereasI show that in fact the collection of all possible worlds is nota set. The latter conclusion remains true even outside of theLewisian framework.
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  41.  34
    Anthony Skelton (2013). Symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics: Introduction. Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.
    This is a brief introduction to a symposium on David Phillips's Sidgwickian Ethics.
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  42.  9
    Eduardo Nicolás Giovannini (2015). Arithmetizing the Geometry From Inside: David Hilbert's Segment Calculus. Scientiae Studia 13 (1):11-48.
    Sobre la base que aportan las notas manuscritas de David Hilbert para cursos sobre geometría, el artículo procura contextualizar y analizar una de las contribuciones más importantes y novedosas de su célebre monografía Fundamentos de la geometría, a saber: el cálculo de segmentos lineales. Se argumenta que, además de ser un resultado matemático importante, Hilbert depositó en su aritmética de segmentos un destacado significado epistemológico y metodológico. En particular, se afirma que para Hilbert este resultado representaba un claro ejemplo (...)
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  43.  10
    Stephen Kemp (2005). Saving the Strong Programme? A Critique of David Bloor's Recent Work. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (4):707-720.
    This article critically appraises David Bloor’s recent attempts to refute criticisms levelled at the Strong Programme’s social constructionist approach to scientific knowledge. Bloor has tried to argue, contrary to some critics, that the Strong Programme is not idealist in character, and it does not involve a challenge to the credibility of scientific knowledge. I argue that Bloor’s attempt to deflect the charge of idealism, which calls on the self-referential theory of social institutions, is partially successful. However, I suggest that (...)
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  44.  11
    Neil McArthur (2004). David Hume's Legal Theory: The Significance of General Laws. History of European Ideas 30 (2):149-166.
    Hume is normally—and in my view, correctly—taken to be a legal conventionalist. However, the nature of Hume's conventionalism has not been well understood. Scholars have often interpreted David Hume as being largely indifferent to the specifics of the laws, so long as they accomplish their basic task of protecting people's property. I argue that this is not correct. Hume thinks certain systems of law will accomplish their purpose, of coordinating people's behaviour for the benefit of all, better than others. (...)
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  45.  43
    Ira M. Schnall (2010). Weak Reasons-Responsiveness Meets its Match: In Defense of David Widerker's Attack on PAP. Philosophical Studies 150 (2):271 - 283.
    David Widerker, long an opponent of Harry Frankfurt's attack on the Principle of Alternative Possibilities (PAP), has recently come up with his own Frankfurt-style scenario which he claims might well be a counterexample to PAP. Carlos Moya has argued that this new scenario is not a counterexample to PAP, because in it the agent is not really blameworthy, since he lacks weak reasonsresponsiveness (WRR), a property that John Fischer has argued is a necessary condition of practical rationality, and hence (...)
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  46.  34
    Ted Toadvine (2005). Limits of the Flesh: The Role of Reflection in David Abram's Ecophenomenology. Environmental Ethics 27 (2):155-170.
    David Abram’s The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human-World convincingly demonstrates the contribution that phenomenology, especially the work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty, can make to environmental theory. But Abram’s account suffers from several limitations that are explored here. First, although Abram intends to develop an “organic” account of thinking as grounded in the sensible world, his descriptions castigate reflection and reverse, rather than rethinking, the traditional hierarchy between mind and body. Second, Abram’s emphasis on perceptual reciprocity (...)
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  47.  31
    John Robertson (2012). David Hume's Political Economy. Hume Studies 37 (1):123-127.
    This collection of papers is as welcome as it is overdue. As its editors observe in their introduction, the reference point for studies of Hume’s economic thinking has remained Eugene Rotwein’s “Introduction” to his volume David Hume: Writings on Economics (Madison: University of Wisconsin Press) since its publication in 1955. The conference from which these papers derive was convened forty-eight years later, in 2003, and the volume was another five years in preparation (while this review, in turn, has taken (...)
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  48.  33
    Altug Yalcintas (2011). A Review Essay on David Laibman's Deep History: A Study in Social Evolution and Human Potential. Journal of Philosophical Economics 5 (1):168-182.
    The frequency of historical materialist explanations in evolutionary social sciences is very low even though historical materialism and evolutionism have great many shared aims towards explaining the long term social change. David Laibman in his Deep History (2007) picks up some of the standard questions of evolutionary social theory and aims at advancing the conception of historical materialism so as to develop a Marxist theory of history from an evolutionary point of view. The contribution of Laibman’s work is to (...)
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  49.  38
    Peter Slezak (1994). A Second Look at David Bloor's: Knowledge and Social Imagery. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (3):336-361.
    The recent republication of David Bloor's Knowledge and Social Imagery in a second edition provides an occasion to reappraise the celebrated work which launched the so-called Strong Programme in the sociology of scientific knowledge. This work embodies the general outlook and foundational principles in a way that is still characteristic of its descendents. Above all, the recent republication of Bloor's original book is evidence of the continuing interest and importance of the work, but it also provides the clearest evidence (...)
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  50. Noelle Dela Cruz (2010). The Philosopher as Romantic Wanderer: An Ekphrastic Engagement with Caspar David Friedrich’s Paintings. Philosophia 39 (1).
    Caspar David Friedrich was the quintessential Romantic figure, portraying the Sublime in his landscape paintings. The Romantic period, particularly in Germany, England, and France, was characterized by the full development of aesthetics as a separate branch of philosophy. The terrible Sublime was contrasted with the more formal elements of Beauty. In this paper, Dr. dela Cruz similarly compares the inarticulable aesthetic sensibility and the more formal method of logical analysis, underscoring her own transition from philosophy to creative writing. She (...)
     
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