Search results for 'David Tell' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  29
    David Tell (2006). Beyond Mnemotechnics: Confession and Memory in Augustine. Philosophy and Rhetoric 39 (3):233-253.
  2.  1
    David Tell (2004). On Belief (Review). Philosophy and Rhetoric 37 (1):96-99.
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  3.  10
    E. G. Turner, M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven, E. Boswinkel, E. P. Wegener, A. H. R. E. Paap, M. Hombert & Cl Preaux (1953). Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. I. The Warren PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. II. Einige Wiener PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. III. Some Oxford PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. IV. De Herodoti reliquiis in papyris et membranis Aegyptiis servatisPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. V. Recherches sur le Recensement dans l'Egypte romaine Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Pap. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:163.
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  4.  7
    Evans David (2007). The Ethics of War Richard Sorabji & David Rodin (Eds.) Ashgate, 2006, Pp. IX+ 253. Philosophy 82 (2):370.
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  5.  16
    Thomas Frangenberg & Ludovico David (1994). The Geometry of a Dome: Ludovico David 's Dichiarazione Della Pittura Della Capella Del Collegio Clementino di Roma. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 57:191-208.
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  6. García Bacca & Juan David (2002). Ensayos y Estudios de Juan David García Bacca. Fundación Para la Cultura Urbana.
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  7. Maxime David & L. Lévy-Bruhl (1912). David Hume. Œuvres philosophiques choisies. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 20 (3):6-7.
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  8. Archard David (forthcoming). Should We Teach Patriotism?/David Archard. Studies in Philosophy and Education.–Ny.
     
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  9.  3
    Madeleine David (1974). Histoire des religions et philosophie au XVIII e siècle : le président de Brosses, David Hume et Diderot. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 164 (2):145 - 160.
  10.  9
    R. W. Hierholzer (2004). Are We Ready for Sexual Reorientation Therapy in the U.S. Military? A Response to David W. Lutz. Christian Bioethics 10 (2-3):227-238.
    In his paper “The Catholic Church, the American Military, and Homosexual Reorientation Therapy,” David W. Lutz ultimately concludes that it is “appropriate, and highly ethical” for the American military to offer reorientation therapy to help homosexuals overcome “the vice of sodomy.” The major thrust of his paper, however, is to call for abandonment of the “Don't Ask/Don't Tell” policy currently in place in the military. Lutz's paper covers much ground, and this review begins by examining whether such a (...)
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  11.  87
    David J. Owens & Brian P. McLaughlin (2000). Self-Knowledge, Externalism and Scepticism: II--David Owens, Scepticisms: Descartes and Hume. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74 (74):119-142.
    [FIRST PARAGRAPHS]The role of Professor McLaughlin's sceptic is to introduce certain 'sceptical hypotheses', hypotheses which imply the falsity of most of what we believe about the world. Professor McLaughlin asks whether these hypotheses are coherent and thus whether they can tell us anything about what are entitled to believe, or to claim to know. He concludes that, semantic externalism notwithstanding, these hypotheses are both coherent and threatening. I shall not question this conclusion but I do wonder whether the fate (...)
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  12.  81
    Terence Rajivan Edward, An Inconsistency in the (Supposed) Prohibitions of Philosophy.
    In different papers, David Liggins and Chris Daly tell philosophers what they should not do. There is no sign of them withdrawing any of these prohibitions, but I show that they fail to be consistent when asserting them. The inconsistency concerns when a philosopher should defer to the empirical findings of science.
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  13.  62
    Jonathan D. Payton (2015). Con-Reasons and the Causal Theory of Action. Philosophical Explorations 18 (1):20-33.
    A con-reason is a reason which plays a role in motivating and explaining an agent's behaviour, but which the agent takes to count against the course of action taken. Most accounts of motivating reasons in the philosophy of action do not allow such things to exist. In this essay, I pursue two aims. First, I argue that, whatever metaphysical story we tell about the relation between motivating reasons and action, con- reasons need to be acknowledged, as they play an (...)
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  14.  8
    Naomi Oreskes, David A. Stainforth & Leonard A. Smith (2010). Adaptation to Global Warming: Do Climate Models Tell Us What We Need to Know? Philosophy of Science 77 (5):1012-1028.
  15.  71
    Neil Campbell Manson (2002). What Does Language Tell Us About Consciousness? First-Person Mental Discourse and Higher-Order Thought Theories of Consciousness. Philosophical Psychology 15 (3):221 – 238.
    The fact that we can engage in first-person discourse about our own mental states seems, intuitively, to be bound up with consciousness. David Rosenthal draws upon this intuition in arguing for his higher-order thought theory of consciousness. Rosenthal's argument relies upon the assumption that the truth-conditions for "p" and "I think that p" differ. It is argued here that the truth-conditional schema debars "I think" from playing one of its roles and thus is not a good test for what (...)
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  16.  26
    David Kettler & Thomas Wheatland (2012). 'How Can We Tell It to the Children?'A Deliberation at the Institute of Social Research January 1941. Thesis Eleven 111 (1):110-122.
  17.  17
    David M. Messick (2009). What Can Psychology Tell Us About Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 89 (1):73 - 80.
    Insights from contemporary psychology can illuminate the common psychological processes that facilitate unethical decision making. I will illustrate several of these processes and describe steps that may be taken to reduce or eliminate the undesirable consequences of these processes. A generic problem with these processes is that they are totally invisible to decision makers – i. e., decision makers are convinced that their decisions are ethically and managerially sound.
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  18. Jay David Atlas (2007). What Reflexive Pronouns Tell Us About Belief : A New Moore's Paradox de Se, Rationality, and Privileged Access. In Mitchell S. Green & John N. Williams (eds.), Moore's Paradox: New Essays on Belief, Rationality, and the First Person. Oxford University Press
  19. David M. Messick (2009). What Can Psychology Tell Us About Business Ethics? Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S1):73-80.
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  20.  2
    David Premack (1988). Intentionality: How to Tell Mae West From a Crocodile. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):522.
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  21.  14
    David Farrell Krell (2007). “A Double Tale I Shall Tell . . . ”. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):287-304.
    Countless poets and thinkers over the ages have identified closely with Empedocles of Acragas. Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843) is one of these. The threeversions of his mourning-play, The Death of Empedocles, give us an opportunity to conceive of the unity of the Empedoclean project—to confront nature and humanexistence alike as tragic. Central to this tragic view of both On Nature and Purifications, reputedly the two books of Empedocles, is the theme of doubling and duplicity, especially the presence in the (one) sphere (...)
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  22.  5
    David Caplan (2000). Lesion Location and Aphasic Syndrome Do Not Tell Us Whether a Patient Will Have an Isolated Deficit Affecting the Coindexation of Traces. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):25-27.
    Data from published case and group studies bear on the trace deletion hypothesis. The deficit-lesion correlational literature does not support Grodzinsky's claim that lesions in and around Broca's area inevitably lead to comprehension deficits specifically related to coindexation of traces or his claim that other lesions spare this function.
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  23.  6
    David W. Gow & Philip C. Rodkin (1999). Can Current Methods of Pathonormal Inference Tell Us Anything About Modularity? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):571-572.
    This commentary on Müller's target article is designed to help bridge the gap between method and theory in neurobiological approaches to language. We focus on pathonormal inference as reflective of broader conceptual issues concerning universality and modularity. Our commentary directs attention to how current methodological and analytic procedures are less than optimal and minimize possibilities for reaching theoretical consensus. We make suggestions about alternative analytic strategies that provide a direction for future scientific progress.
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  24.  5
    David Farrell Krell (2007). “A Double Tale I Shall Tell . . . ”: Empedocles and Hölderlin on Tragic Nature and Tragic Purification. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (2):287-304.
    Countless poets and thinkers over the ages have identified closely with Empedocles of Acragas. Friedrich Hölderlin (1770–1843) is one of these. The threeversions of his mourning-play, The Death of Empedocles, give us an opportunity to conceive of the unity of the Empedoclean project—to confront nature and humanexistence alike as tragic. Central to this tragic view of both On Nature and Purifications, reputedly the two books of Empedocles, is the theme of doubling and duplicity, especially the presence in the (one) sphere (...)
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  25. Owen Flanagan Churchland, John Gabrieli, Melvyn Goodale, Anthony Greenwald, Valerie Hardcastle, Larry Jacoby, Christof Koch, Philip Merikle, David Milner & Daniel Schacter (1997). What Does Implicit Cognition Tell Us About Consciousness? Consciousness and Cognition 6:148.
     
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  26.  2
    Randy Cohen (2002). The Good, the Bad & the Difference: How to Tell Right From Wrong in Everyday Situations. Doubleday.
    The man behind the New York Times Magazine ’s immensely popular column “The Ethicist”–syndicated in newspapers across the United States and Canada as “Everyday Ethics”–casts an eye on today’s manners and mores with a provocative, thematic collection of advice on how to be good in the real world. Every week in his column on ethics, Randy Cohen takes on conundrums presented in letters from perplexed people who want to do the right thing (or hope to get away with doing the (...)
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  27. David Herman & Roger C. Schank (1996). Tell Me a Story: A New Look at Real and Artificial Memory. Substance 25 (1):140.
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  28. Spencer K. Wertz (2000). Between Hume's Philosophy and History: Historical Theory and Practice. Upa.
    This book explores the historical dimension of David Hume's philosophy, a feature that Spencer Wertz calls 'historical empiricism.' According to Wertz, Hume sought to understand the present in terms of the past in a way that anticipates the historical constructionism of R.G. Collingwood and Herbert Butterfield. Hume's method is to tell a story about something's origin in which ideas yield impressions. These impressions eventually yield to experience that includes history as part of its structure. Arguing that Hume worked (...)
     
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  29.  2
    David Sloan Wilson (2007). Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin's Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives. Delacorte Press.
    What is the biological reason for gossip? For laughter? For the creation of art? Why do dogs have curly tails? What can microbes tell us about morality? These and many other questions are tackled by renowned evolutionist David Sloan Wilson in this witty and groundbreaking new book. With stories that entertain as much as they inform, Wilson outlines the basic principles of evolution and shows how, properly understood, they can illuminate the length and breadth of creation, from the (...)
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  30.  3
    David Carrier (1986). The Presentness of Painting: Adrian Stokes as Aesthetician. Critical Inquiry 12 (4):753-768.
    Adrian Stokes , long admired by a small, highly distinguished, mostly English circle, was the natural successor to Pater and Ruskin. But though his place in cultural history is important, what is of particular interest now to art historians is his theory of the presentness of painting, a theory which offers a challenging critique of the practice of artwriting. From Vasari to the present, the most familiar rhetorical strategy of the art historian is the narrative of “the form, prophet-saviour-apostles,” in (...)
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  31. David Nyberg (1993). The Varnished Truth. University of Chicago Press.
    Everyone says that lying is wrong. But when we say that lying is bad and hurtful and that we would never intentionally tell a lie, are we really deceiving anyone? In this wise and insightful book, David Nyberg exposes the tacit truth underneath our collective pretense and reveals that an occasional lie can be helpful, healthy, creative, and, in some situations, even downright moral. _The Varnished Truth_ takes us beyond philosophical speculation and clinical analysis to give us a (...)
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  32. David Simpson (2002). Situatedness, or, Why We Keep Saying Where We Re Coming From. Duke University Press Books.
    “Let me tell you where I'm coming from...”—so begins many a discussion in contemporary U.S. culture. Pressed by an almost compulsive desire to situate ourselves within a definite matrix of reference points in both scholarly inquiry and everyday parlance, we seem to reject adamantly the idea of a universal human subject. Yet what does this rhetoric of self-affiliation tell us? What is its history? David Simpson’s _Situatedness_ casts a critical eye on this currently popular form of identification, (...)
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  33. David Stark & Nancy Warner (2013). This Place, These People: Life and Shadow on the Great Plains. Columbia University Press.
    Nancy Warner's photographs tell the stories of buildings that were once loved yet have now been abandoned. Her evocative images are juxtaposed with the voices of Nebraska farm people, lovingly recorded by sociologist David Stark.
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  34. David van Mill (2010). Deliberation, Social Choice and Absolutist Democracy. Routledge.
    Social choice theory and theories of deliberative discourse have deeply impacted on the way political scientists understand the dynamics of democratic politics and decision-making. _Deliberation, Social Choice and Absolutist Democracy_ addresses the dispute between these competing schools of thought. Deliberative democracy and social choice theorists offer the two dominant and competing conceptions of participation in contemporary democratic theory. With the former holding that theories of discourse tell us that through the democratic process we can arrive at consensus, rational outcomes (...)
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  35.  52
    Katherine Hawley (forthcoming). David Lewis on Persistence. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), A Companion to David Lewis. Wiley-Blackwell 237-49.
    This paper provides an overview on David Lewis's writings about persistence. I focus on two issues. First, what is the relationship between the doctrine of Humean Supervenience and the rejection of endurantism? Second, why did Lewis not adopt a stage theory of persistence, given that he advocated a counterpart theory of modality?
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  36.  13
    Basil Hiley & F. David Peat (eds.) (1991). Quantum Implications: Essays in Honour of David Bohm. Routledge.
    David Bohm is one of the foremost scientific thinkers of today and one of the most distinguished scientists of his generation. His challenge to the conventional understanding of quantum theory has led scientists to reexamine what it is they are going and his ideas have been an inspiration across a wide range of disciplines. Quantum Implications is a collection of original contributions by many of the world' s leading scholars and is dedicated to David Bohm, his work and (...)
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  37.  39
    Benj Hellie (forthcoming). David Lewis and the Kangaroo: Graphing Philosophical Progress. In Russell Blackford & Damien Broderick (eds.), Philosophy's Future: The Problem of Philosophical Progress. Blackwell
    Data-driven historiography of philosophy looks to objective modeling tools for illumination of the propagation of influence. While the system of David Lewis, the most influential philosopher of our time, raises historiographic puzzles to stymie conventional analytic methods, it proves amenable to data-driven analysis. A striking result is that Lewis only becomes the metaphysician of current legend following the midpoint of his career: his initial project is to frame a descriptive science of mind and meaning; the transition to metaphysics is (...)
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  38.  98
    Dale Jamieson (2013). Consequentialism, Climate Change, and the Road Ahead. Chicago Journal of International Law 13 (2):439-468.
    In this paper I tell the story of the evolution of the climate change regime, locating its origins in "the dream of Rio," which supposed that the nations of the world would join in addressing the interlocking crises of environment and development. I describe the failure at Copenhagen and then go on to discuss the "reboot" of the climate negotiations advocated by Eric A. Posner and David Weisbach. I bring out some ambiguities in their notion of International Paretianism, (...)
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  39. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  40. Anthony Skelton (2013). Sidgwick’s Argument for Utilitarianism and His Moral Epistemology: A Reply to David Phillips. Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.
    David Phillips’s Sidgwickian Ethics is a penetrating contribution to the scholarly and philosophical understanding of Henry Sidgwick’s The Methods of Ethics. This note focuses on Phillips’s understanding of (aspects of) Sidgwick’s argument for utilitarianism and the moral epistemology to which he subscribes. In § I, I briefly outline the basic features of the argument that Sidgwick provides for utilitarianism, noting some disagreements with Phillips along the way. In § II, I raise some objections to Phillips’s account of the epistemology (...)
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  41. B. Brogaard (2004). Contextualism, Skepticism, and the Gettier Problem. Synthese 139 (3):367 - 386.
    The contextualist epistemological theories proposed by David Lewis and othersoffer a view of knowledge which awards a central role to the contexts ofknowledge attributions. Such contexts are held to determine how strong anepistemic position must be in order to count as knowledge. Lewis has suggestedthat contextualism so construed can be used both to ward off the skeptic and tosolve the Gettier problem. A person knows P, he says, just in case her evidenceeliminates every possibility that not-P, where the domain (...)
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  42.  93
    Matthew Silverstein (2015). The Shmagency Question. Philosophical Studies 172 (5):1127-1142.
    Constitutivists hope to locate the foundations of ethics in the nature of action. They hope to find norms that are constitutive of agency. Recently David Enoch has argued that even if there are such norms, they cannot provide the last word when it comes to normativity, since they cannot tell us whether we have reason to be agents rather than shmagents. I argue that the force of the shmagency objection has been considerably overestimated, because philosophers on both sides (...)
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  43.  33
    Louis Derosset (2011). On the Plurality of Worlds: David Lewis. [REVIEW] Humana.Mente 19.
    A commentary on David Lewis's /On the Plurality of Worlds/.
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  44.  67
    Uwe Steinhoff, A Critique of David Miller's Like Minded Group and Cooperative Practice Models of Collective Responsibility.
    Many authors writing about global justice seem to take national responsibility more or less for granted. Most of them, however, offer very little argument for their position. One of the few exceptions is David Miller. He offers two models of collective responsibility: the like-minded group model and the cooperative practice model. While some authors have criticized whether these two models are applicable to nations, as Miller intends, my criticism is more radical: I argue that these two models fail as (...)
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  45. Katalin Balog (2000). Phenomenal Judgment and the HOT Theory: Comments on David Rosenthal’s “Consciousness, Content, and Metacognitive Judgments”. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):215-219.
    In this commentary I criticize David Rosenthal’s higher order thought theory of consciousness . This is one of the best articulated philosophical accounts of consciousness available. The theory is, roughly, that a mental state is conscious in virtue of there being another mental state, namely, a thought to the effect that one is in the first state. I argue that this account is open to the objection that it makes “HOT-zombies” possible, i.e., creatures that token higher order mental states, (...)
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  46.  15
    Nathan Ballantyne & Justin Tosi (2015). David Foster Wallace on the Good Life. In Steven M. Cahn & Maureen Eckert (eds.), Freedom and the Self: Essays on the Philosophy of David Foster Wallace. Columbia University Press 133-168.
  47.  4
    Mike VanQuickenborne (2016). Everyday Examples: An Introduction to Philosophy, by David Cunning. Teaching Philosophy 39 (1):106-110.
    Everyday Examples. An Introduction to Philosophy. presents the student with a somewhat unorthodox approach to the grand themes of philosophy. David Cunning has chosen an alternate route into many of the standard questions put to those in an introduction to philosophy course, both organizationally and content-wise. It will be quickly evident to the instructor that this approach has both its advantages and disadvantages.
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  48.  53
    Jean Hampton (1995). Does Hume Have an Instrumental Conception of Practical Reason? Hume Studies 21 (1):57-74.
    Many philosophers and social scientists regard the instrumental theory of practical reason as highly plausible, and standardly credit David Hume as the first philosopher to formulate this conception of reason clearly. Yet Hume does not advocate the instrumental conception of practical reason as that conception is normally understood by contemporary theorists who endorse it. Instead, Hume's view is that there is no such thing as "practical reason", that is, no such thing as a form of reason that has either (...)
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  49. David Gauthier (1979). David Hume, Contractarian. Philosophical Review 88 (1):3-38.
  50. Reviews by Robert Stecker & John Dilworth (2005). David Davies, Art as Performance. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (1):75–80.
    In his absorbing book Art as Performance, David Davies argues that artworks should be identified, not with artistic products such as paintings or novels, but instead with the artistic actions or processes that produced such items. Such a view had an earlier incarnation in Currie’s widely criticized “action type hypothesis”, but Davies argues that it is instead action tokens rather than types with which artworks should be identified. This rich and complex work repays the closest study in spite of (...)
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