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  1.  117 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1994). Telling the Truth to Patients: A Clinical Ethics Exploration. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (03):375-.
    In this essay I will examine why the truth is so important to human communication in general, the types of truth, and why truth is only a relative value. After those introductory points, I will sketch the ways in which the truth is overridden or trumped by other concerns in the clinical setting. I will then discuss cases that fall into five distinct categories. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of truth telling and its primacy among secondary goods in the healthcare (...)
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  2.  61 DLs
    Patricia A. Marshall, David C. Thomasma & Abdallah S. Daar (1996). Marketing Human Organs: The Autonomy Paradox. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 17 (1).
    The severe shortage of organs for transplantation and the continual reluctance of the public to voluntarily donate has prompted consideration of alternative strategies for organ procurement. This paper explores the development of market approaches for procuring human organs for transplantation and considers the social and moral implications of organ donation as both a gift of life and a commodity exchange. The problematic and paradoxical articulation of individual autonomy in relation to property rights and marketing human body parts is addressed. We (...)
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  3.  56 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1981). Philosophy of Medicine as the Source for Medical Ethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):5-11.
    The article offers an approach to inquiry about, the foundation of medical ethics by addressing three areas of conceptual presupposition basic to medical ethical theory. First, medical ethics must presuppose a view about the nature of medicine. it is argued that the view required by a cogent medical morality entails that medicine be seen both as a healing relationship and as a practical art. Three ways in which medicine inherently involves values and valuation are presented as important, i.e., in being (...)
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  4.  35 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1990). Establishing the Moral Basis of Medicine: Edmund D. Pellegrino's Philosophy of Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 15 (3):245-267.
    Pellegrino's philosophy of medicine is explored in categories such as the motivation in constructing a philosophy of medicine, the method, the starting point of the doctor-patient relationship, negotiation about values in this relationship, the goal of the relationship, the moral basis of medicine, and additional concerns in the relationship (concerns such as gatekeeping, philosophical anthropology, axiology, philosophy of the body, and the general disjunction between science and morals). A critique of this philosophy is presented in the following areas: methodology, relation (...)
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  5.  24 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (2000). Moral and Metaphysical Reflections on Multiple Personality Disorder. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 21 (3):235-260.
  6.  22 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1984). The Comatose Patient, the Ontology of Death, and the Decision to Stop Treatment. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (2).
    In this paper I address three problems posed by modern medical technology regarding comatose dying patients. The first is that physicians sometimes hide behind the tests for whole-brain death rather than make the necessary human decision. The second is that the tests themselves betray a metaphysical judgment about death that may be ontologically faulty. The third is that discretion used by physicians and patients and/or family in deciding to cease treatment when the whole-brain death criteria may not be met are (...)
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  7.  21 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1987). Challenges for a Philosophy of Medicine of the Future: A Response to Fellow Philosophers in the Netherlands. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2):187-204.
  8.  20 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1996). An Analysis of Arguments for and Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Part One. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (01):62-.
    In advanced technological societies there is growing concern about the prospect of protracted deaths marked by incapacitation, intolerable pain and indignity, and invasion by machines and tubing. Life prolongation for critically ill cancer patients in the United States, for example, literally costs a fortune for very little benefit, typically from $82,845 to $189,339 for an additional year of life. Those who return home after major interventions live on average only 3 more months; the others live out their days in a (...)
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  9.  20 DLs
    Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (1981). Toward an Axiology for Medicine a Response to Kazem Sadegh-Zadeh. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (3):331-342.
  10.  19 DLs
    Jacqueline J. Glover, David T. Ozar & David C. Thomasma (1986). Teaching Ethics on Rounds: The Ethicist as Teacher, Consultant, and Decision-Maker. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 7 (1).
    This paper explores the relationship between teaching and consulting in clinical ethics teaching and the role of the ethics teacher in clinical decision-making. Three roles of the clinical ethics teacher are discussed and illustrated with examples from the authors' experience. Two models of the ethics consultant are contrasted, with an argument presented for the ethics consultant as decision facilitator. A concluding section points to some of the challenges of clinical ethics teaching.
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  11.  18 DLs
    Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (1987). Medicine as a Science of Action a Response to Peter Hucklenbroich. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (2):235-243.
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  12.  15 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & Edmund D. Pellegrino (1987). The Role of the Family and Physicians in Decisions for Incompetent Patients. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 8 (3).
  13.  14 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1996). When Physicians Choose to Participate in the Death of Their Patients: Ethics and Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 24 (3):183-197.
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  14.  13 DLs
    Andrew Griffin & David C. Thomasma (1983). Triage and Critical Care of Children. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 4 (2).
    Critical care as a discipline has become so expensive that some have proposed extensive limitations on the amount of money devoted to it by society. In this paper that issue is examined with respect to pediatric and neonatal intensive care. Initially, a case is presented which includes many of the ethical and economic issues. The neonatal population at present has a tolerable median cost, with a distinctly higher average cost created by many special cases such as the one described with (...)
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  15.  13 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1985). Editorial Philosophy of Medicine in the U.S.A. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (3).
  16.  13 DLs
    Edmund D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (2000). Dubious Premises—Evil Conclusions: Moral Reasoning at the Nuremberg Trials. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 9 (02):261-274.
    Fifty years ago, 23 Nazi physicians were defendants before a military tribunal in Nuremberg, charged with crimes against humanity. During that trial, the world learned of their personal roles in human experimentation with political and military prisoners, mass eugenic sterilizations, state-ordered euthanasia of the and the program of genocide we now know as the Holocaust. These physicians, and their colleagues who did not stand trial, were universally condemned in the free world as ethical pariahs. The term became the paradigm for (...)
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  17.  12 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & David N. Weisstub (eds.) (2004). The Variables of Moral Capacity. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Moral capacity is an important feature of what it means to be human. In this volume, the contributors have taken on the daunting task of trying to distinguish between legal and moral capacity. This distinction is difficult at times for clinicians, philosophers and legal scholars alike. Part of the challenge of defining moral capacity lies in the difficulty of adequately categorizing it. For this reason, the editors have chosen to divide the book into three parts. The first looks at the (...)
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  18.  12 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1998). Assessing the Arguments for and Against Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Part Two. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (4):388-401.
    In Márquez's OfLoveandOtherDemons Abrenuncio the physician and the Marquis discuss the outbreak of rabies that is the centerpiece of the book, since the Marquis' daughter has been bitten by a rabid dog. Abrenuncio notes that the poor.
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  19.  11 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1988). Applying General Medical Knowledge to Individuals: A Philosophical Analysis. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (2):187-200.
    Applying general and statistical knowledge to individuals is difficult either on epidemiological or epistemological grounds. This paper examines these difficulties from the perspective of computer registers of epidemiological data.
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  20.  11 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (2001). Bioethics with a Difference: A Comment on McElhinney and Pellegrino. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (4):287-290.
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  21.  10 DLs
    John F. Monagle & David C. Thomasma (1988). Editorial. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (1).
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  22.  10 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1995). From the Editor in Chief. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 16 (1).
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  23.  10 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1994). Clinical Ethics as Medical Hermeneutics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (2).
    There are several branches of ethics. Clinical ethics, the one closest to medical decisionmaking, can be seen as a branch of medicine itself. In this view, clinical ethics is a unitary hermeneutics. Its rule is a guideline for unifying other theories of ethics in conjunction with the clinical context. Put another way, clinical ethics interprets the clinical situation in light of a balance of other values that, while guiding the decisionmaking process, also contributes to the very weighting of those values. (...)
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  24.  9 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1997). Edmund D. Pellegrino Festschrift. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
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  25.  9 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (2000). Medical Ethics. Philosophical Inquiry 22 (4):7-23.
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  26.  9 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & Thomasine Kimbrough Kushner (eds.) (1996). Birth to Death: Science and Bioethics. Cambridge University Press.
    Biology has been advancing with explosive pace over the last few years and in so doing has raised a host of ethical issues. This book, aimed at the general reader, reviews the major advances of recent years in biology and medicine and explores their ethical implications. From birth to death the reader is taken on a tour of human biology - covering genetics, reproduction, development, transplantation, aging, dying and also the use of animals in research and the impact of human (...)
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  27.  9 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1990). Setting Floating Limits. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 9 (3/4):133-146.
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  28.  9 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (2001). Proposing a New Agenda: Bioethics and International Human Rights. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 10 (3):299-310.
    Our global knowledge of different cultures and the diversity of values increases almost daily. New challenges arise for ethics. This is especially true in the field of bioethics because the technological progress of medicine throughout the world is causing dramatic interactions with traditionally held values. Science and technology are rapidly advancing beyond discussions and corresponding political struggles over human rights, leaving those debates behind. This rapid development of science is at odds with the principle of sustained development that calls for (...)
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  29.  9 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1997). Antifoundationalism and the Possibility of a Moral Philosophy of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 18 (1-2).
    The problem of developing a moral philosophy of medicine is explored in this essay. Among the challenges posed to this development are the general mistrust of moral philosophy and philosophy in general created by post-modernist philosophical and even anti-philosophical thinking. This reaction to philosophical systematization is usually called antifoundationalism. I distinguish different forms of antifoundationalism, showing that not all forms of their opposites, foundationalism, are alike, especially with regards to claims made about the certitude of moral thought. I conclude that (...)
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  30.  9 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & B. Ingemar B. Lindahl (1989). Editorial. Theoretical Medicine 10 (1):v.
  31.  8 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (2001). Personhood and Health Care. Kluwer Academic Pub..
    This book offers a rich variety of thoughtful explorations on the nature of the human person especially as related to health care, medicine, and mental health. Rarely are so many different viewpoints collected in one place about the intriguing puzzle that is the concept of person, human dignity, and the special place human beings hold in the goals of healing and the social structures of medical delivery. Ramifications of the theory of personhood are presented for bioethics, genetics, individuality, uniqueness, international (...)
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  32.  8 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1991). Yes: David C. Thomasma, Ph.D. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 3 (6):349-350.
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  33.  8 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1990). Euthanasia: Toward an Ethical Social Policy. Continuum.
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  34.  7 DLs
    Jonathan Muraskas, Patricia A. Marshall, Paul Tomich, Thomas F. Myers, John G. Gianopoulos & David C. Thomasma (1999). Neonatal Viability in the 1990s: Held Hostage by Technology. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):160-170.
    The emergence of new obstetrical and neonatal technologies, as well as more aggressive clinical management, has significantly improved the survival of extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants. This development has heightened concerns about the limits of viability. ELBW infants, weighing less than 1,000 grams and no larger than the palm of one's hand, are often described as of late twentieth century technology. Improved survivability of ELBW infants has provided opportunities for long-term follow-up. Information on their physical and emotional development contributes (...)
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  35.  7 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1984). Autonomy in the Doctor-Patient Relation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (1).
    As an introduction to this issue, I argue that the concept of autonomy is clearly important for many of the freedoms we enjoy. The problem in medicine with its use lies in interpreting the concept with respect to the impact of disease on persons, the models of medicine we employ, and the settings in which the problems arise. A short statement about the major points of the authors collected in this issue concludes the editorial.
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  36.  7 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1991). Why Philosophers Should Offer Ethics Consultations. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 12 (2).
    Considerable debate has occurred about the proper role of philosophers when offering ethics consultations. Some argue that only physicians or clinical experienced personnel should offer ethics consultations in the clinical setting. Others argue still further that philosophers are ill-equipped to offer such advice, since to do so rests on no social warrant, and violates the abstract and neutral nature of the discipline itself.I argue that philosophers not only can offer such consultations but ought to. To be a bystander when one's (...)
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  37.  7 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1983). The Role of the Clinical Medical Ethicist. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 5:136-157.
    No categories
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  38.  7 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & B. Ingemar B. Lindahl (1988). Goodbye and Challenges. Theoretical Medicine 9 (3).
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  39.  6 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1982). The Future of Medical Ethics: A Response to Andre de Vries. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 3 (1):125-127.
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  40.  6 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1999). Stewardship of the Aged: Meeting the Ethical Challenge of Ageism. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (02):148-159.
    Medical ethics is a footnote to the larger problem of directing our technology to good human ends. Written large, then, medical ethics must ask five basic questions.
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  41.  6 DLs
    E. D. Pellegrino & David C. Thomasma (1981). Response to Our Commentators. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 2 (1):43-51.
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  42.  6 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (2001). Selling Human Egg Donation. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):1.
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  43.  6 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1995). Principles of Health Care Ethics. Gillon R, Ed, Lloyd A, Assist. Ed. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1994. 1118 Pp. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 4 (02):251-.
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  44.  6 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1967). The Electron Reviewed. New Scholasticism 41 (2):159-190.
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  45.  5 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (2000). A Model of Community Substituted Consent for Research on the Vulnerable. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 3 (1):47-57.
    Persons of diminished capacity, especially those who are still legally competent but are de facto incompetent should still be able to participate in moderately risky research projects that benefit the class of persons with similar diseases. It is argued that this view can be supported with a modified communitarianism, a philosophy ofmedicine that holds that health care is a joint responsibility that meets foundational human needs. The mechanism for obtaining a substituted consent I call ``community consent,'' and distinguish this from (...)
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  46.  5 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1985). The Philosophy of Medicine in Europe: Challenges for the Future. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 6 (1).
    Two challenges face European philosophy of medicine. The first is to counterbalance what is seen as an overemphasis on social analysis of medicine with greater attention to its personal and individual dimensions. The second, related challenge, is to more fully understand the clinical realities of modern medicine, which in turn, give rise to the scope and limits of physician duties, patient obligations, and social concerns.
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  47.  5 DLs
    David C. Thomasma & Erich H. Loewy (1996). Exploring the Role of Religion in Medical Ethics. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (02):257-.
    From time to time medical ethicists bemoan the loss of a religious perspective in medical ethics. The discipline had its origins in the thinking of explicitly religious thinkers such as Paul Ramsey and Joseph Fletcher. Furthermore, many of those who contributed to the early development of the discipline had training in theology. One thinks of Daniel Callahan, Richard McCormick, Albert Jonsen, Sam. Banks. As the discipline becomes more and more self-reflective, with attention being paid to methodological and conditional concerns, it (...)
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  48.  5 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1992). Models of the Doctor-Patient Relationship and the Ethics Committee: Part One. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 1 (01):11-.
    Past ages of medical care are condemned in modern philosophical and medical literature as being too paternalistic. The normal account of good medicine in the past was, indeed, paternalistic in an offensive way to modern persons. Imagine a Jean Paul Sartre going to the doctor and being treated without his consent or even his knowledge of what will transpire during treatment! From Hippocratic times until shortly after World War II, medicine operated in a closed, clubby manner. The knowledge learned in (...)
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  49.  5 DLs
    David Thomasma (2000). The Vulnerability of the Sick. Bioethics Forum 16 (2):5-12.
  50.  4 DLs
    David C. Thomasma (1997). Bioethics and International Human Rights. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 25 (4):295-306.
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