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  1. David V. Newman (2005). Douglas Walton, Abductive Reasoning Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (6):444-446.
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  2. David V. Newman (2004). Chaos and Qualia. Essays in Philosophy 5 (1):1-21.
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  3. David V. Newman (2001). Chaos, Emergence, and the Mind-Body Problem. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2):180-96.
  4. David V. Newman (2001). Impersonal Interaction and Ethics on the World-Wide-Web. Ethics and Information Technology 3 (4):239-246.
    In this paper, I will examine a classof ethical problems that essentially involvescomputers. I will argue that this class of heretoforeunknown ethical problems arise in broadcastcommunication received with a device of some kind, andinvolve what I will call impersonal interaction. Ialso argue that the moral element in such problemslies in a conflict between property rights and freespeech rights. Finally, I will argue that the bestapproach to solving these problems requires thecreation of a new standard protocol for computercommunication rather than laws (...)
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  5. David V. Newman (1999). Avrum Stroll, Sketches of Landscapes: Philosophy by Example Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 19 (3):229-230.
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  6. David V. Newman (1996). Emergence and Strange Attractors. Philosophy of Science 63 (2):245-61.
    Recent work in the Philosophy of Mind has suggested that alternatives to reduction are required in order to explain the relationship between psychology and biology or physics. Emergence has been proposed as one such alternative. In this paper, I propose a precise definition of emergence, and I argue that chaotic systems provide concrete examples of properties that meet this definition. In particular, I suggest that being in the basin of attraction of a strange attractor is an emergent property of any (...)
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