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  1. David W. Kidner (2012). Nature and Experience in the Culture of Delusion: How Industrial Society Lost Touch with Reality. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book explores the way that human symbolic abilities have precipitated the colonisation and replacement of the natural world by the industrial order, transforming human character and experience.
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  2. David W. Kidner (2005). Fraud, Fantasy, and Fiction in Environmental Writing. Environmental Ethics 27 (4):391-410.
    During the past several decades, a number of accounts of environmental and ethnic wisdom have appeared which have later been exposed as fraudulent. The widespread popularity of these accounts should be understood as symptomatic of valid feelings and awarenesses that are unable to find expression in the modern world, and are usually dissociated from mainstream decision-making processes. As the natural order continues to be degraded, forms such as fiction which currently have relatively low status will become more important as vehicles (...)
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  3. David W. Kidner (2004). Industrialism and the Fragmentation of Temporal Structure. Environmental Ethics 26 (2):135-153.
    Industrialism’s assimilation of the natural world has developed over the centuries through complex hierarchies of effects involving ecological, cultural, and psychological dimensions. One of the consequences of this assimilation is the fragmentation of the temporal structure of the world and its replacement by a short-term logic that also infects human subjectivity. Because of this fragmentation, the healing of the natural world cannot be realized either simply or directly, and effective action requires us to locate our immediate objectives within a recovered (...)
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  4. David W. Kidner (2000). Fabricating Nature: A Critique of the Social Construction of Nature. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):339-357.
    Models of nature have usually referred to ecological, or more generally, scientific understandings, and have seldom included cultural factors. Recently, however, there has been a trend toward defining nature as a “social construction,” that is, as an artifact of human social and linguistic capability. I argue that constructionism attempts to assimilate nature to an exclusively anthropocentric “reality,” and that it should be seen as expressing long-term industrialist tendencies to separate the “human” and the “natural” realms and to assimilate the latter (...)
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  5. David W. Kidner (1998). Culture and the Unconscious in Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 20 (1):61-80.
    I argue that much current environmental theory is unwittingly grounded in assumptions about personhood that entangle it within existing ideology. Culture theory, I suggest, offers a way out of this entanglement through its perception of our immersion within a symbolic realm which precedes consciousness. Environmental theory, by embodying, articulating and legitimating cultural forms, can avoid being assimilated by those individualistic and scientistic assumptions which undermine its potential.
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  6. David W. Kidner (1994). Why Psychology is Mute About the Environmental Crisis. Environmental Ethics 16 (4):359-376.
    Psychology, often defined as the science of human behavior, has so far had little to say about the environmental destruction which is currently occurring as the result of human behavior. I consider the reasons why it has not and suggest that the ideological preconceptions that underpin the discipline are similar to those of the technological-economic system that is largely responsible for degradation ofthe environment. Psychology, by normalizing the behavioral, life-style, and personality configurations associated with environmental destruction, and lacking a historical (...)
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