Search results for 'David W. Wills' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Margaret W. Grimes & Garry Wills (1984). Response to Garry Wills. Critical Inquiry 11 (1):179.score: 460.0
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  2. David Wills (2010). The Audible Life of the Image. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 18 (2):43-64.score: 260.0
    "Since at least 1980 Godard’s cinema has been explicitly looking for (its) music, as if for its outside. In Sauve qui peut (la vie) Paul Godard hears, and asks about it, coming through the hotel room wall, and it follows him down to the lobby, but remains “off,” like Marguerite Duras’s voice, in spite of his questions, until the final sequence. At that moment, at the end of the section entitled “Music,” the protagonist is at the same time struck by (...)
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  3. David Wills (2010). Review of Jacques Derrida, The Beast and the Sovereign, Volume 1. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (4).score: 240.0
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  4. David Wills (2008). Dorsality: Thinking Back Through Technology and Politics. University of Minnesota Press.score: 240.0
    The dorsal turn -- Facades of the other : Heidegger, Althusser, Levinas -- No one home : Homer, Joyce, Broch -- A line drawn in the ocean : Exodus, Freud, Rimbaud -- Friendship in torsion : Schmitt, Derrida -- Revolutions in the darkroom : Balázs, Benjamin, Sade -- The controversy of dissidence : Nietzsche.
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  5. David Wills (2005). Matchbook: Essays in Deconstruction. Stanford University Press.score: 240.0
    Matchbook consists of nine essays written around, or in response to, work published by Jacques Derrida since 1980. The focal point of the essays is the “Envois,” which forms part of Derrida’s Post Card. Particular attention is paid to how that text articulates with the ethical and political emphases of Derrida’s more recent work, but also to its autobiographical conceit. The “incendiary” reference of the book’s title underscores deconstruction’s engagement with questions of reading: relations between (slow) reading and the speed (...)
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  6. Bernard N. Wills (2011). The Philosophy of John Norris. By W. J. Mander. Heythrop Journal 52 (1):140-142.score: 240.0
  7. Peter Brunette & David Wills (1994). The Spatial Arts: An Interview with Jacques Derrida. In Peter Brunette & David Wills (eds.), Deconstruction and the Visual Arts: Art, Media, Architecture. Cambridge University Press. 9--32.score: 240.0
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  8. David Wills (2004). Derrida, Now and Then, Here and There. Theory and Event 7 (2).score: 240.0
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  9. Giorgio Agamben, Gernot BÖHME, Bernard Stiegler & David Wills (2009). Mensch, Medien, Körper, Kehre: Zum posthumanistischen Immerschon. Philosophische Rundschau 56 (1):1 - 16.score: 240.0
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  10. Peter Brunette & David Wills (eds.) (1994). Deconstruction and the Visual Arts: Art, Media, Architecture. Cambridge University Press.score: 240.0
    Deconstruction and the Visual Arts brings together a series of new essays by scholars of aesthetics, art history and criticism, film, television and architecture. Working with the ideas of French philosopher Jacques Derrida, the essays explore the full range of his analyses. They are modelled on the variety of critical approaches that he has encouraged, from critiques of the foundations of our thinking and disciplinary demarcation, to creative and experimental readings of visual 'texts'. Representing some of the most innovative thinking (...)
     
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  11. David Wills (2001). Derrida and Aesthetics: Lemming (Reframing the Abyss). In Tom Cohen (ed.), Jacques Derrida and the Humanities: A Critical Reader. Cambridge University Press. 108.score: 240.0
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  12. David Wills (2008). Passionate Secrets and Democratic Dissidence. Diacritics 38 (1-2):17-29.score: 240.0
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  13. Daniel Gibson, Benders G., A. Gwynedd, Cynthia Andrews-Pfannkoch, Evgeniya Denisova, Baden-Tillson A., Zaveri Holly, Stockwell Jayshree, B. Timothy, Anushka Brownley, David Thomas, Algire W., A. Mikkel, Chuck Merryman, Lei Young, Vladimir Noskov, Glass N., I. John, J. Craig Venter, Clyde Hutchison, Smith A. & O. Hamilton (2008). Complete Chemical Synthesis, Assembly, and Cloning of a Mycoplasma Genitalium Genome. Science 319 (5867):1215--1220.score: 170.0
    We have synthesized a 582,970-base pair Mycoplasma genitalium genome. This synthetic genome, named M. genitalium JCVI-1.0, contains all the genes of wild-type M. genitalium G37 except MG408, which was disrupted by an antibiotic marker to block pathogenicity and to allow for selection. To identify the genome as synthetic, we inserted "watermarks" at intergenic sites known to tolerate transposon insertions. Overlapping "cassettes" of 5 to 7 kilobases (kb), assembled from chemically synthesized oligonucleotides, were joined by in vitro recombination to produce intermediate (...)
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  14. David Wills (2009). The Blushing Machine: Animal Shame and Technological Life. Parrhesia 8:34-42.score: 160.0
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  15. Ellen W. Bernal (2008). Review of Planning for Uncertainty: Living Wills and Other Advance Directives for You and Your Family , 2nd Edition by David John Doukas, M.D., and William Reichel, M.D. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):1-3.score: 126.0
    Advance directives are useful ways to express one's wishes about end of life care, but even now most people have not completed one of the documents. David Doukas and William Reichel strongly encourage planning for end of life care. Although Planning for Uncertainty is at times fairly abstract for the general reader, it does provide useful background and practical steps.
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  16. Stephen R. Gliessman (1985). Food and Energy: Will There Be Enough? Food and Energy Resources David Pimentel Carl W. Hall. Bioscience 35 (9):594-594.score: 81.0
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  17. Marian David (1991). Neither Mentioning 'Brains in a Vat' nor Mentioning Brains in a Vat Will Prove That We Are Not Brains in a Vat. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 51 (4):891-896.score: 80.0
    In Reason, Truth, and History Hilary Putnam has presented an anti-skeptical argument purporting to prove that we are not brains in a vat. How exactly the argument goes is somewhat controversial. A number of competing "recon¬structions" have been proposed. They suffer from a defect which they share with what seems to be Putnam's own version of the argument. In this paper, I examine a very simple and rather natural reconstruction of the argument, one that does not employ any premises in (...)
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  18. Jacques Den'ida (2002). The Animal That Therefore I Am (More to Follow)" Trans. David Wills. Critical Inquiry 2:207.score: 72.0
     
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  19. Todd Dufresne (2006). David Wills, Matchbook: Essays in Deconstruction Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (2):148-150.score: 72.0
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  20. James B. Lewis (1992). : The United States Presidents and Their Wills . Herbert R. Collins, David B. Weaver. ; Facts About the Presidents . Joseph Nathan Kane. [REVIEW] Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 4 (1):69-83.score: 72.0
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  21. Erin Manning (1998). A Critical Ellipsis: Spacing as an Alternative to Criticism: On Deconstruction and the Visual Arts: Art, Media, Architecture , Edited by Peter Brunette and David Wills. Film-Philosophy 2 (1).score: 72.0
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  22. Vladimir D. Thomas (2010). David Wills, Dorsality: Thinking Back Through Technology and Politics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):385-387.score: 72.0
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  23. Vladimir D. Thomas (2009). David Wills, Dorsality: Thinking Back Through Technology and Politics. Philosophy in Review 29 (5):385.score: 72.0
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  24. Graham Cairns-Smith, Thomas W. Clark, Ravi Gomatam, Robert H. Kane, Nicholas Maxwell, J. J. C. Smart, Sean A. Spence & Henry P. Stapp (2005). Commentaries on David Hodgson's "a Plain Person's Free Will&Quot;. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (1):20-75.score: 42.0
    REMARKS ON EVOLUTION AND TIME-SCALES, Graham Cairns-Smith; HODGSON'S BLACK BOX, Thomas Clark; DO HODGSON'S PROPOSITIONS UNIQUELY CHARACTERIZE FREE WILL?, Ravi Gomatam; WHAT SHOULD WE RETAIN FROM A PLAIN PERSON'S CONCEPT OF FREE WILL?, Gilberto Gomes; ISOLATING DISPARATE CHALLENGES TO HODGSON'S ACCOUNT OF FREE WILL, Liberty Jaswal; FREE AGENCY AND LAWS OF NATURE, Robert Kane; SCIENCE VERSUS REALIZATION OF VALUE, NOT DETERMINISM VERSUS CHOICE, Nicholas Maxwell; COMMENTS ON HODGSON, J.J.C. Smart; THE VIEW FROM WITHIN, Sean Spence; COMMENTARY ON HODGSON, Henry Stapp.
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  25. A. W. H. Adkins, Robert B. Louden & Paul Schollmeier (eds.) (1996). The Greeks and Us: Essays in Honor of Arthur W.H. Adkins. University of Chicago Press.score: 39.0
    Arthur W. H. Adkins's writings have sparked debates among a wide range of scholars over the nature of ancient Greek ethics and its relevance to modern times. Demonstrating the breadth of his influence, the essays in this volume reveal how leading classicists, philosophers, legal theorists, and scholars of religion have incorporated Adkins's thought into their own diverse research. The timely subjects addressed by the contributors include the relation between literature and moral understanding, moral and nonmoral values, and the contemporary meaning (...)
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  26. Gerard Delanty (ed.) (2004). Theodor W. Adorno. Sage.score: 36.0
    Theodor W.Adorno was one of the towering intellectuals of the twentieth century. His contributions cover such a myriad of fields, including the sociology of culture, social theory, the philosophy of music, ethics, art and aesthetics, film, ideology, the critique of modernity and musical composition, that it is difficult to assimilate the sheer range and profundity of his achievement. His celebrated friendship with Walter Benjamin has produced some of the most moving and insightful correspondence on the origins and objects of the (...)
     
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  27. David Foster Wallace, Steven M. Cahn & Maureen Eckert (2010). Fate, Time and Language: An Essay on Free Will. Columbia University Press.score: 32.0
    In 1962, the philosopher Richard Taylor used six commonly accepted presuppositions to imply that human beings have no control over the future. David Foster Wallace not only took issue with Taylor's method, which, according to him, scrambled the relations of logic, language, and the physical world, but also noted a semantic trick at the heart of Taylor's argument. -/- Fate, Time, and Language presents Wallace's brilliant critique of Taylor's work. Written long before the publication of his fiction and essays, (...)
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  28. Thomas W. Smythe & Thomas G. Evans (2007). Intuition as a Basic Source of Moral Knowledge. Philosophia 35 (2):233-247.score: 30.0
    The idea that intuition plays a basic role in moral knowledge and moral philosophy probably began in the eighteenth century. British philosophers such as Anthony Shaftsbury, Francis Hutcheson, Thomas Reid, and later David Hume talk about a “moral sense” that they place in John Locke’s theory of knowledge in terms of Lockean reflexive perceptions, while Richard Price seeks a faculty by which we obtain our ideas of right and wrong. (...)
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  29. Roman Altshuler (forthcoming). Free Will, Narrative, and Retroactive Self-Constitution. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-17.score: 30.0
    John Fischer has recently argued that the value of acting freely is the value of self-expression. Drawing on David Velleman’s earlier work, Fischer holds that the value of a life is a narrative value and free will is valuable insofar as it allows us to shape the narrative structure of our lives. This account rests on Fischer’s distinction between regulative control and guidance control. While we lack the former kind of control, on Fischer’s view, the latter is all that (...)
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  30. Anders Kraal (2013). A Humean Objection to Plantinga's Quantitative Free Will Defense. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 73 (3):221-233.score: 30.0
    Plantinga’s The Nature of Necessity (1974) contains a largely neglected argument for the claim that the proposition “God is omnipotent, omniscient, and wholly good” is logically consistent with “the vast amount and variety of evil the universe actually contains” (not to be confused with Plantinga’s famous “Free Will Defense,” which seeks to show that this same proposition is logically consistent with “some evil”). In this paper I explicate this argument, and argue that it assumes that there is more moral good (...)
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  31. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).score: 30.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  32. M. W. F. Stone & Jonathan Wolff (eds.) (2000). The Proper Ambition of Science. Routledge.score: 30.0
    What is the proper relation between the scientific worldview and other parts or aspects of human knowledge and experience? Can any science aim at "complete coverage" of the world, and if it does, will it undermine--in principle or by tendency--other attempts to describe or understand the world? Should morality, theology and other areas resist or be protected from scientific treatment? Questions of this sort have been of pressing philosophical concern since antiquity. The Proper Ambition of Science presents ten particular case (...)
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  33. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). The Poetry of Nachoem M. Wijnberg. Continent 1 (2):129-135.score: 30.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 129-135. Introduction Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei Successions of words are so agreeable. It is about this. —Gertrude Stein Nachoem Wijnberg (1961) is a Dutch poet and novelist. He also a professor of cultural entrepreneurship and management at the Business School of the University of Amsterdam. Since 1989, he has published thirteen volumes of poetry and four novels, which, in my opinion mark a high point in Dutch contemporary literature. His novels even more than his poetry are (...)
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  34. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2011). The Poetry of Nachoem M. Wijnberg. Continent 1 (2):129-135.score: 30.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 129-135. Introduction Vincent W.J. van Gerven Oei Successions of words are so agreeable. It is about this. —Gertrude Stein Nachoem Wijnberg (1961) is a Dutch poet and novelist. He also a professor of cultural entrepreneurship and management at the Business School of the University of Amsterdam. Since 1989, he has published thirteen volumes of poetry and four novels, which, in my opinion mark a high point in Dutch contemporary literature. His novels even more than his poetry are (...)
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  35. Karen Green (2011). Will the Real Enlightenment Historian Please Stand Up? Catharine Macaulay Versus David Hume. In Stephen Buckle Craig Taylor (ed.), Hume and the Enlightenment. Pickering & Chatto.score: 30.0
    Argues that on an interpretation of the Enlightenment which emphasises its radical potential and importance for the development of democracy Catharine Macaulay should be recognised as a more centrally Enlightenment historian than David Hume.
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  36. David Kelley (2002). Reply to Jonathan Jacobs: Contesting a Review. Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 4 (1):237 - 239.score: 30.0
    David Kelley responds to Jonathan Jacobs' review of his The Contested Legacy of Ayn Rand' Truth and Toleration in Objectivism ("A Contest of Wills," Journal of Ayn Rand Studies, Fall 2001). He argues that his goal was not to provide a technical treatise on Objectivism, but to focus on a debate within Objectivism. Toward the former end, he provides a brief bibliography of relevant technical treatments of Objectivist epistemology and ethics.
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  37. Peter Goldie (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Emotion. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1097-1099.score: 27.0
    The emotions were a neglected topic in philosophy twenty or so years ago, but things have now changed. It is now appreciated how important it is to understand the emotions as an independent aspect of our mental economy – one that has to be properly taken into account in any worthwhile philosophising in ethics or moral psychology, in epistemology, in aesthetics, and generally in philosophical issues surrounding value and how the mind engages with value in the world. There is now (...)
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  38. Mark Colyvan, Scientific Realism and Mathematical Nominalism: A Marriage Made in Hell.score: 27.0
    The Quine-Putnam Indispensability argument is the argument for treating mathematical entities on a par with other theoretical entities of our best scientific theories. This argument is usually taken to be an argument for mathematical realism. In this chapter I will argue that the proper way to understand this argument is as putting pressure on the viability of the marriage of scientific realism and mathematical nominalism. Although such a marriage is a popular option amongst philosophers of science and mathematics, in light (...)
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  39. Erich Rast, Context as Assumptions. MSH Lorraine Preprints 2010 of the Proceedings of the Epiconfor Workshop on Epistemology, Nancy 2009.score: 27.0
    In the tradition of Stalnaker (1978,2002, context can be regarded as a set of assumptions that are mutually shared by a group of epistemic agents.An obvious generalization of this view is to explicitly represent each agent’s assumptions in a given situation and update them accordingly when new information is accepted. I lay out a number of philosophical and linguistic requirements for using such a model in order to describe communication of ideally-rational agents. In particular,the following questions are addressed: -/- 1. (...)
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  40. C. J. Arthur (1986). Ineffability and Intelligibility: Towards an Understanding of the Radical Unlikeness of Religious Experience. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):109 - 129.score: 27.0
    I do not for a moment question the fact that many people have experiences of a special type which may be termed “religious”, The extent to which religious experience may be regarded as a reasonably common phenomenon in present-day Britain is shown clearly by David Hay in his Exploring Inner Space, Harmondsworth 1982. that such experiences often involve reference to something which appears to display a radical unlikeness to all else and that they are therefore in some sense inexpressible. (...)
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  41. Michael E. Zimmerman (1985). The Critique of Natural Rights and the Search for a Non-Anthropocentric Basis for Moral Behavior. Journal of Value Inquiry 19 (1):43-53.score: 27.0
    MacIntyre, Clark, and Heidegger would all agree that the current problem with moral theory is its lack of a satisfactory conception of human telos. This lack leads us to resort to such fictions as rights, interests, and utility, which are “disguises for the will to power.” Ibid., p. 240. These thinkers would also agree that modern nation-states are cut off from the roots of the Western tradition. Modern political economy, with “its individualism, its acquisitiveness and its elevation of the values (...)
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  42. Ruiping Fan (ed.) (2011). The Renaissance of Confucianism in Contemporary China. Springer.score: 27.0
    Under the clear and thoughtful editorship of Ruiping Fan, The Renaissance of Confucianism in Contemporary China provides new and highly substantive insights into the emergence of a renewed, relevant, and perceptively engaged Confucianism in 21st century China. Through the vibrantly diverse essays contained in this volume, and in cogent overview through Fan’s introduction, one learns that Confucianism is thoroughly misunderstood, if it is seen only through Western lenses. It cannot be absorbed into that rights-based “global” discourse that has been the (...)
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  43. Vincent G. Potter (ed.) (1988). Doctrine and Experience: Essays in American Philosophy. Fordham University Press.score: 27.0
    This collection of thirteen essays, when viewed together, offers a unique perspective on the history of American philosophy. It illuminates for the first time in book form, how thirteen major American philosophical thinkers viewed a problem of special interest in the American philosophical tradition: the relationship between experience and reflection. Written by well-known authorities on the figure about which he or she writes, the essays are arranged chronologically to highlight the changes and developments in thought from Puritanism to Pragmatism to (...)
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  44. Geoffrey Roberts (ed.) (2001). The History and Narrative Reader. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Are historians storytellers? Is it possible to tell true stories about the past? These are just a couple of the questions raised in this comprehensive collection of texts about philosophy, theory, and methodology of writing history. Drawing together seminal texts from philosophers and historians, this volume presents the great debate over the narrative character of history from the 1960s onwards. The History and Narrative Reader combines theory with practice to offer a unique overview of this debate and illuminates the practical (...)
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  45. Michael Ruse (ed.) (2007). Philosophy of Biology. Prometheus Books.score: 27.0
    Biologists study life in its various physical forms, while philosophers of biology seek answers to questions about the nature, purpose, and impact of this research. What permits us to distinguish between living and nonliving things even though both are made of the same minerals? Is the complex structure of organisms proof that a creative force is working its will in the physical universe, or are existing life-forms the random result of an evolutionary process working itself out over eons of time? (...)
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  46. Shadi Bartsch & Thomas Bartscherer (eds.) (2005). Erotikon: Essays on Eros, Ancient and Modern. University of Chicago Press.score: 27.0
    Erotikon brings together leading contemporary intellectuals from a variety of fields for an expansive debate on the full meaning of eros . Renowned scholars of philosophy, literature, classics, psychoanalysis, theology, and art history join poets and a novelist to offer fresh insights into a topic that is at once ancient and forever young. Restricted neither by historical period nor by genre, these contributions explore manifestations of eros throughout Western culture, in subjects ranging from ancient philosophy and baroque architecture to modern (...)
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  47. William Casebeer (2003). Natural Ethical Facts: Evolution, Connectionism, and Moral Cognition. MIT Press.score: 27.0
    In Natural Ethical Facts William Casebeer argues that we can articulate a fully naturalized ethical theory using concepts from evolutionary biology and cognitive science, and that we can study moral cognition just as we study other forms of cognition. His goal is to show that we have "softly fixed" human natures, that these natures are evolved, and that our lives go well or badly depending on how we satisfy the functional demands of these natures. Natural Ethical Facts is a comprehensive (...)
     
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  48. Michael O'Rourke (2011). The Afterlives of Queer Theory. Continent 1 (2):102-116.score: 27.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 102-116. All experience open to the future is prepared or prepares itself to welcome the monstrous arrivant, to welcome it, that is, to accord hospitality to that which is absolutely foreign or strange [….] All of history has shown that each time an event has been produced, for example in philosophy or in poetry, it took the form of the unacceptable, or even of the intolerable, or the incomprehensible, that is, of a certain monstrosity. Jacques Derrida “Passages—from (...)
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  49. Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.) (2010). The Ethical Life: Fundamental Readings in Ethics and Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Introduction -- Value theory : the nature of the good life -- Epicurus letter to Menoeceus -- John Stuart Mill, Hedonism -- Aldous Huxley, Brave new world -- Robert Nozick, The experience machine -- Richard Taylor, The meaning of life -- Jean Kazez, Necessities -- Normative ethics : theories of right conduct -- J.J.C. Smart, Eextreme and restricted utilitarianism -- Immanuel Kant the good will & the categorical imperative -- Thomas Hobbes, Leviathan -- Philippa Foot, Natural goodness -- Aristotle, Nicomachean (...)
     
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  50. Brendan Shea (2010). Three Ways of Getting It Wrong: Induction in Wonderland. In Richard Brian Davis (ed.), Alice in Wonderland and Philosophy: Curiouser and Curiouser. Wiley Blackwell. 93-107.score: 27.0
    Alice encounters at least three distinct problems in her struggles to understand and navigate Wonderland. The first arises when she attempts to predict what will happen in Wonderland based on what she has experienced outside of Wonderland. In many cases, this proves difficult -- she fails to predict that babies might turn into pigs, that a grin could survive without a cat or that playing cards could hold criminal trials. Alice's second problem involves her efforts to figure out the basic (...)
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