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Profile: David Wood
Profile: David Wood (Vanderbilt University)
  1. J. G. Fichte, F. W. J. Schelling, Michael G. Vater & David W. Wood (2012). The Philosophical Rupture Between Fichte and Schelling: Selected Texts and Correspondence (1800-1802). State University of New York Press.
    Correspondence and texts by Fichte and Schelling illuminate their thought and the trajectory of their philosophical falling out.
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  2. David Wood (2012). Continental Philosophy: Back to the Future. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):206-219.
    In its many interwoven traditions, continental philosophy has a distinctive focus on what escapes the concept—experience, change, agency, responsibility, the future, the Other. The challenges that face us in the future are many: reaffirming and renewing what has already been thought and needs repeating, responding to emergent questions. None could be more urgent than the question of the animal and the fate of the planet. Addressing each of these requires that we suspend our normal conceptual assurances and think anew.
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  3. David Wood (2012). The Truth About Animals. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):159-167.
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  4. David W. Wood (2012). "Mathesis of the Mind": A Study of Fichte's Wissenschaftslehre and Geometry. Rodopi.
    This is the first major study in any language on J.G. Fichte’s philosophy of mathematics and theory of geometry. It investigates both the external formal and internal cognitive parallels between the axioms, intuitions and constructions of geometry and the scientific methodology of the Fichtean system of philosophy. In contrast to “ordinary” Euclidean geometry, in his Erlanger Logik of 1805 Fichte posits a model of an “ursprüngliche” or original geometry – that is to say, a synthetic and constructivistic conception grounded in (...)
     
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  5. Greg Roebuck & David Wood (2011). A Retributive Argument Against Punishment. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):73-86.
    This paper proposes a retributive argument against punishment, where punishment is understood as going beyond condemnation or censure, and requiring hard treatment. The argument sets out to show that punishment cannot be justified. The argument does not target any particular attempts to justify punishment, retributive or otherwise. Clearly, however, if it succeeds, all such attempts fail. No argument for punishment is immune from the argument against punishment proposed here. The argument does not purport to be an argument only against retributive (...)
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  6. David Wood (2011). Toxicity and Transcendence. Angelaki 16 (4):31 - 42.
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 31-42, December 2011.
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  7. Cornelia Gräbner & David Wood, Introduction: Poetics of Resistance.
    The following text provides a conceptual and theoretical introduction to a collection of essays written by members of the multidisciplinary network of scholars, artists and cultural producers named ‘Poetics of Resistance’, which seeks to analyse and encourage discussion of the relationships between creativity, culture and political resistance, in the context of neoliberal globalization. The introduction also provides a critical glossary of a set of loosely interlinking keywords, following Raymond Williams, that mark points of encounter and departure between the approaches of (...)
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  8. Cornelia Gräbner & David Mj Wood (2010). Poetics of Resistance: Introduction. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 6 (2):1-19.
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  9. David Wood (2010). Punishment: Consequentialism. Philosophy Compass 5 (6):455-469.
    Punishment involves deliberating harming individuals. How, then, if at all, is it to be justified? This, the first of three papers on the philosophy of punishment (see also 'Punishment: Nonconsequentialism' and 'Punishment: The Future'), examines attempts to justify the practice or institution according to its consequences. One claim is that punishment reduces crime, and hence the resulting harms. Another is that punishment functions to rehabilitate offenders. A third claim is that punishment (or some forms of punishment) can serve to make (...)
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  10. David Wood (2010). Punishment: The Future. Philosophy Compass 5 (6):483-491.
    A companion to 'Punishment: Consequentialism' and 'Punishment: Nonconsequentialism', which examine attempts to justify punishment as a state institution, this paper considers possible alternatives to punishment. On the assumption that there are two elements to punishment, an element of condemnation and of hard treatment, the paper considers, first, the alternative of condemnation without hard treatment, and secondly, of hard treatment without condemnation. The paper then looks ahead to possible developments in thinking and theorising about punishment.
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  11. David Mj Wood (2010). Film and the Archive: Nation, Heritage, Resistance. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 6 (2):162-174.
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  12. Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey R. Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood (2009). The Supply of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures Among U.S. Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):497 - 527.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a dramatically expanding area of activity for managers and academics. Consumer demand for responsibly produced and fair trade goods is swelling, resulting in increased demands for CSR activity and information. Assets under professional management and invested with a social responsibility focus have also grown dramatically over the last 10 years. Investors choosing social responsibility investment strategies require access to information not provided through traditional financial statements and analyses. At the same time, a group of mainstream (...)
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  13. David Murakami Wood & Rodrigo Firmino (2009). Empowerment or Repression? Opening Up Questions of Identification and Surveillance in Brazil Through a Case of 'Identity Fraud'. Identity in the Information Society 2 (3):297-317.
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  14. David W. Wood (2009). Kant and the Power of Imagination by Jane Kneller. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):464-468.
  15. Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood (2008). A Survey of Governance Disclosures Among U.S. Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):543 - 563.
    Recent years have featured a spate of regulatory action pertaining to the development and/or disclosure of corporate governance structures in response to financial scandals resulting in part from governance failures. During the same period, corporate governance activists and institutional investors increasingly have called for increased voluntary governance disclosure. Despite this attention, there have been relatively few comprehensive studies of governance disclosure practices and response to the regulation. In this study, we examine a sample of 50 U.S. firms and their public (...)
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  16. J. Aaron Simmons & David Wood (eds.) (2008). Kierkegaard and Levinas: Ethics, Politics, and Religion. Indiana University Press.
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  17. David Wood (2007). Econstructions : Theory and Theology. The Preoriginal Gift and Our Response to It / Anne Primavesi ; Prometheus Redeemed? From Autoconstruction to Ecopoetics / Kate Rigby ; Toward a Deleuze-Guattarian Micropneumatology of Spirit-Dust / Luke Higgins ; Specters of Derrida : On the Way to Econstruction. In Laurel Kearns & Catherine Keller (eds.), Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. Fordham University Press.
  18. David Wood (2007). Part 3. The Narrative Imaginary. Double Trouble: Narrative Imagination as a Carnival Dragon. In Peter Gratton, John Panteleimon Manoussakis & Richard Kearney (eds.), Traversing the Imaginary: Richard Kearney and the Postmodern Challenge. Northwestern University Press.
     
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  19. David Wood (2007). Time After Time. Indiana University Press.
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  20. David W. Wood (2007). Notes for a Romantic Encyclopaedia: Das Allgemeine Brouillon. State University of New York Press.
    The first English translation of Novalis’s unfinished notes for a universal science, Das Allgemeine Brouillon.
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  21. David Wood (2006). On Being Haunted by the Future. Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):274-298.
    Derrida insists that we understand the 'to-come' not as a real future 'down the road', but rather as a universal structure of immanence. But such a structure is no substitute for the hard work of taking responsibility for what are often entirely predictable and preventable disasters (9/11, the Iraq war, Katrina, global warming). Otherwise "the future can only be anticipated in the form of an absolute danger". Derrida devotes much attention to proposing, imagining, hoping for a 'future' in which im-possible (...)
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  22. David Wood (2006). On the Way to Econstruction. Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):35-46.
    Environmentalism finds itself facing problems and aporiae which deconstruction helps us address. But equally, environmental concerns can embolden deconstruction to embrace a strategic materialism – the essential interruptibility of every idealization. Moreover, deconstruction’s critique of presence opens us to the strange temporalities of environmentalism: needing to act before we have proof, and for the benefit of future humans. The history of the earth is a singular sequence, ideographic – concrete, not rule governed, and not to be repeated. French ‘anti-humanism’ is (...)
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  23. John Magney, Scott Erickson & David Wood (2005). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 18 (1):112-120.
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  24. José Medina, & David Wood (eds.) (2005). Truth: Engagements Across Philosophical Traditions. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  25. David Wood (2005). Some Questions for My Levinasian Friends. In Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust & Kent Still (eds.), Addressing Levinas. Northwestern University Press. 152--169.
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  26. David Wood (2005). The Step Back: Ethics and Politics After Deconstruction. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the ethical and political possibilities of philosophy after deconstruction.
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  27. David Wood & José Medina (eds.) (2005). Truth: Engagements Across Philosophical Traditions. Blackwell Pub..
  28. Ilan Alon, Richard C. Woodbridge, Tony Diana, Scott Erickson, Richard Smith & David Wood (2003). Book Notes. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 15 (4):81-84.
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  29. Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell & David Wood (2003). Six-Year-Olds' Difficulties Handling Intensional Contexts. Cognition 87 (2):73-99.
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  30. Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell, David Wood, Michele Miozzo, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, James R. Brockmole, Ranxiao Frances Wang & Jeffrey Lidz (2003). Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida and Eliana Colunga (Indiana University) Whose Dam Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman, 209–213. Cognition 87:237-239.
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  31. David Wood (2002). Afterword on Novalis. Philosophical Forum 33 (3):359–364.
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  32. David Wood (2002). Novalis (1772–1801): "Beginning", "Know Thy Self" and "When Numbers and Figures". Philosophical Forum 33 (3):318–325.
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  33. David Wood (2002). Retribution, Crime Reduction and the Justification of Punishment. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (2):301-321.
    The ‘dualist project’ in the philosophy of punishment is to show how retributivist and reductivist (utilitarian) considerations can be combined to provide an adequate justification of punishment. Three types of dualist theories can be distinguished—‘split‐level’, ‘integrated’ and ‘mere conjunction’. Split‐level theories (e.g. Hart, Rawls) must be rejected, as they relegate retributivist considerations to a lesser role. An attempted integrated theory is put forward, appealing to the reductivist means of deterrence. However, it cannot explain how the two types of considerations, retributivist (...)
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  34. David Wood (2002). Thinking After Heidegger. Blackwell Publishers.
    Thinking at the limit -- The return of experience -- The voyage of reason -- Heidegger and the challenge of repetition -- Heidegger's reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of spirit -- Heidegger after Derrida -- The actualization of philosophy : Heidegger and Adorno -- Much obliged -- Comment ne pas manger : deconstruction and humanism -- The performative imperative : reflections on Heidegger's Contributions to philosophy (from eventuation).
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  35. David Wood (2001). Novalis: Kant Studies (1797). Philosophical Forum 32 (4):323–338.
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  36. David Wood (2001). What is Ecophenomenology? Research in Phenomenology 31 (1):78-95.
    What is eco-phenomenology? This paper argues that eco-phenomenology, in which are folded both an ecological phenomenology and a phenomenological ecology, offers us a way of developing a middle ground between phenomenology and naturalism, between intentionality and causality. Our grasp of Nature is significantly altered by thinking through four strands of time's plexity - the invisibility of time, the celebration of finitude, the coordination of rhythms, and the interruption and breakdown of temporal horizons. It is also transformed by a meditation on (...)
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  37. David Wood (2000). Ethos Beyond Ethics: Remarks on Charles Scott. Research in Phenomenology 30 (1):212-222.
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  38. David Wood (2000). The International Campaign Against the Multilateral Agreement on Investment: A Test Case for the Future of Globalisation? Ethics, Place and Environment 3 (1):25 – 45.
    Written from the point of view of a campaigner against economic globalisation, this paper looks at the recent Multilateral Agreement on Investment (MAI) and the campaign against it which eventually led to its demise. It looks at the nature of the diverse coalition of interests opposed to the MAI, and in particular their use of e-mail and the Internet, and argues that the success of this campaign has lessons beyond the immediate victory over the forces promoting the MAI. It is (...)
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  39. David Wood (1999). The Experience of the Ethical. In Richard Kearney & Mark Dooley (eds.), Questioning Ethics: Contemporary Debates in Philosophy. Routledge. 105--120.
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  40. David Wood (1998). Thinking God in the Wake of Kierkegaard. In Jonathan Rée & Jane Chamberlain (eds.), Kierkegaard: A Critical Reader. Blackwell. 53--74.
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  41. Frank R. Ascione, Claudia V. Weber & David S. Wood (1997). The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered. Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.
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  42. Frank R. Ascione, David S. Wood & Claudia V. Weber (1997). The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered. Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.
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  43. David Wood (1997). Reductivism, Retributivism, and the Civil Detention of Dangerous Offenders. Utilitas 9 (01):131-.
    The paper examines one objection to the suggestion that, rather than being subjected to extended prison sentences on the one hand, or simply released on the other, dangerous offenders should be in principle liable to some form of civil detention on completion of their normal sentences. This objection raises the spectre of a , pursuing various reductivist means outside the criminal justice system. The objection also threatens to undermine dualist theories of punishment, theories which combine reductivist and retributivist considerations. The (...)
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  44. David Wood (1997). Much Obliged. Philosophy Today 41 (1):135-140.
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  45. David Wood (1994). Business Justice: Transactions, Resources, and Organisations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (6):481 - 486.
    This paper outlines an egalitarian theory of business justice, and indicates its requirements in respect of the central business institutions of transactions, resources and organisations.
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  46. David Wood (ed.) (1993). Of Derrida, Heidegger, and Spirit. Northwestern University Press.
    Responses and Responsibilities: An Introduction In Jacques Derrida published a book entitled De I'esprit: Heidegger et la Question. ...
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  47. David Wood (1993). The Actualisation of Philosophy and the Logic of Geist: From Avoidance to Deployment. In , Of Derrida, Heidegger, and Spirit. Northwestern University Press. 73--81.
     
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  48. David Wood (ed.) (1992). Derrida: A Critical Reader. Blackwell.
     
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  49. David Wood (1992). Reading Derrida: An Introduction. In , Derrida: A Critical Reader. Blackwell. 1--4.
     
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  50. David Wood & Thomas Dutoit (1992). Passions: An Oblique Offering. In , Derrida: A Critical Reader. Blackwell.
     
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