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David Wood [91]David W. Wood [21]David A. Wood [2]David Mj Wood [2]
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Profile: David Wood
Profile: David Wood (Vanderbilt University)
Profile: David W. Wood (Université Paris 4)
  1.  37
    Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey R. Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood (2009). The Supply of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures Among U.S. Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):497 - 527.
    Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is a dramatically expanding area of activity for managers and academics. Consumer demand for responsibly produced and fair trade goods is swelling, resulting in increased demands for CSR activity and information. Assets under professional management and invested with a social responsibility focus have also grown dramatically over the last 10 years. Investors choosing social responsibility investment strategies require access to information not provided through traditional financial statements and analyses. At the same time, a group of mainstream (...)
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  2.  19
    Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood (2008). A Survey of Governance Disclosures Among U.S. Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):543 - 563.
    Recent years have featured a spate of regulatory action pertaining to the development and/or disclosure of corporate governance structures in response to financial scandals resulting in part from governance failures. During the same period, corporate governance activists and institutional investors increasingly have called for increased voluntary governance disclosure. Despite this attention, there have been relatively few comprehensive studies of governance disclosure practices and response to the regulation. In this study, we examine a sample of 50 U.S. firms and their public (...)
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  3. David Wood (2010). Punishment: Consequentialism. Philosophy Compass 5 (6):455-469.
    Punishment involves deliberating harming individuals. How, then, if at all, is it to be justified? This, the first of three papers on the philosophy of punishment (see also 'Punishment: Nonconsequentialism' and 'Punishment: The Future'), examines attempts to justify the practice or institution according to its consequences. One claim is that punishment reduces crime, and hence the resulting harms. Another is that punishment functions to rehabilitate offenders. A third claim is that punishment (or some forms of punishment) can serve to make (...)
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  4.  12
    Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell & David Wood (2003). Six-Year-Olds' Difficulties Handling Intensional Contexts. Cognition 87 (2):73-99.
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  5.  13
    David W. Wood (2015). The Johannine Question: From Fichte to Steiner. Southern Cross Review 99.
  6.  44
    Greg Roebuck & David Wood (2011). A Retributive Argument Against Punishment. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (1):73-86.
    This paper proposes a retributive argument against punishment, where punishment is understood as going beyond condemnation or censure, and requiring hard treatment. The argument sets out to show that punishment cannot be justified. The argument does not target any particular attempts to justify punishment, retributive or otherwise. Clearly, however, if it succeeds, all such attempts fail. No argument for punishment is immune from the argument against punishment proposed here. The argument does not purport to be an argument only against retributive (...)
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  7. David Wood (2001). What is Ecophenomenology? Research in Phenomenology 31 (1):78-95.
    What is eco-phenomenology? This paper argues that eco-phenomenology, in which are folded both an ecological phenomenology and a phenomenological ecology, offers us a way of developing a middle ground between phenomenology and naturalism, between intentionality and causality. Our grasp of Nature is significantly altered by thinking through four strands of time's plexity - the invisibility of time, the celebration of finitude, the coordination of rhythms, and the interruption and breakdown of temporal horizons. It is also transformed by a meditation on (...)
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  8.  1
    Joshua R. Gubler, Nathan P. Kalmoe & David A. Wood (2015). Them’s Fightin’ Words: The Effects of Violent Rhetoric on Ethical Decision Making in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 130 (3):705-716.
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  9. David Wood (1979). An Introduction to Derrida. Radical Philosophy 21:18-28.
     
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  10.  63
    David W. Wood (2009). Kant and the Power of Imagination by Jane Kneller. European Journal of Philosophy 17 (3):464-468.
  11.  27
    David Wood (2002). Thinking After Heidegger. Blackwell Publishers.
    Thinking at the limit -- The return of experience -- The voyage of reason -- Heidegger and the challenge of repetition -- Heidegger's reading of Hegel's Phenomenology of spirit -- Heidegger after Derrida -- The actualization of philosophy : Heidegger and Adorno -- Much obliged -- Comment ne pas manger : deconstruction and humanism -- The performative imperative : reflections on Heidegger's Contributions to philosophy (from eventuation).
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  12.  14
    David Wood (1980). Style and Strategy at the Limits of Philosophy. The Monist 63 (4):494-511.
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  13.  45
    Robert Bernasconi & David Wood (eds.) (1988). The Provocation of Levinas: Rethinking the Other. Routledge.
    This book brings together the most interesting and far-reaching responses to the work of Levinas in three key areas: contemporary feminism, psychotherapy and Levinas's relation to other philosophers. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  14.  14
    David Wood (1989). The Deconstruction of Time. Humanities Press International.
    Originally published in 1989, The Deconstruction of Time was the first to examine what has become the fundamental, even defining, project in continental ...
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  15.  13
    Frank R. Ascione, Claudia V. Weber & David S. Wood (1997). The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered. Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.
    The maltreatment of animals, usually companion animals, may occur in homes where there is domestic violence, yet we have limited information about the prevalence of such maltreatment. We surveyed the largest shelters for women who are battered in 49 states and the District of Columbia. Shelters were selected if they provided overnight facilities and programs or services for children. Ninety-six percent of the shelters responded. Analysis revealed that it is common for shelters to serve women and children who talk about (...)
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  16.  2
    David Wood & Robert Bernasconi (eds.) (1988). Derrida and Differance. Northwestern University Press.
    A Society of the Friends of Difference would have to include Heraclitus, Nietzsche, Saussure, Freud, Adorno, Heidegger, Levinas, Deleuze, and Lyotard among its most prominent members.
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  17. Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey R. Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood (2009). The Supply of Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures Among U.S. Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):497-527.
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  18.  6
    David Wood (2002). Retribution, Crime Reduction and the Justification of Punishment. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (2):301-321.
    The ‘dualist project’ in the philosophy of punishment is to show how retributivist and reductivist (utilitarian) considerations can be combined to provide an adequate justification of punishment. Three types of dualist theories can be distinguished—‘split‐level’, ‘integrated’ and ‘mere conjunction’. Split‐level theories (e.g. Hart, Rawls) must be rejected, as they relegate retributivist considerations to a lesser role. An attempted integrated theory is put forward, appealing to the reductivist means of deterrence. However, it cannot explain how the two types of considerations, retributivist (...)
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  19.  8
    David Wood (1991). Political Openings. Graduate Faculty Philosophy Journal 14 (2/1):465-478.
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  20.  43
    David Wood (2010). Punishment: The Future. Philosophy Compass 5 (6):483-491.
    A companion to 'Punishment: Consequentialism' and 'Punishment: Nonconsequentialism', which examine attempts to justify punishment as a state institution, this paper considers possible alternatives to punishment. On the assumption that there are two elements to punishment, an element of condemnation and of hard treatment, the paper considers, first, the alternative of condemnation without hard treatment, and secondly, of hard treatment without condemnation. The paper then looks ahead to possible developments in thinking and theorising about punishment.
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  21.  49
    David Wood (2006). On Being Haunted by the Future. Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):274-298.
    Derrida insists that we understand the 'to-come' not as a real future 'down the road', but rather as a universal structure of immanence. But such a structure is no substitute for the hard work of taking responsibility for what are often entirely predictable and preventable disasters (9/11, the Iraq war, Katrina, global warming). Otherwise "the future can only be anticipated in the form of an absolute danger". Derrida devotes much attention to proposing, imagining, hoping for a 'future' in which im-possible (...)
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  22. David Wood (1990). Philosophy at the Limit. Unwin Hyman.
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  23.  33
    David Wood (1997). Reductivism, Retributivism, and the Civil Detention of Dangerous Offenders. Utilitas 9 (1):131.
    The paper examines one objection to the suggestion that, rather than being subjected to extended prison sentences on the one hand, or simply released on the other, dangerous offenders should be in principle liable to some form of civil detention on completion of their normal sentences. This objection raises the spectre of a, pursuing various reductivist means outside the criminal justice system. The objection also threatens to undermine dualist theories of punishment, theories which combine reductivist and retributivist considerations. The paper (...)
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  24.  5
    Frank R. Ascione, David S. Wood & Claudia V. Weber (1997). The Abuse of Animals and Domestic Violence: A National Survey of Shelters for Women Who Are Battered. Society and Animals 5 (3):205-218.
    The maltreatment of animals, usually companion animals, may occur in homes where there is domestic violence, yet we have limited information about the prevalence of such maltreatment. We surveyed the largest shelters for women who are battered in 49 states and the District of Columbia. Shelters were selected if they provided overnight facilities and programs or services for children. Ninety-six percent of the shelters responded. Analysis revealed that it is common for shelters to serve women and children who talk about (...)
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  25.  32
    David Wood (1978). Nozick's Justification of the Minimal State. Ethics 88 (3):260-262.
  26.  16
    David Wood (2012). The Truth About Animals. Environmental Philosophy 9 (2):159-167.
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  27.  7
    David W. Wood (2014). From "Fichticizing" to "Romanticizing": Fichte and Novalis on the Activities of Philosophy and Art. Fichte-Studien 41:247-278.
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  28.  35
    David Wood (1979). Hume on Identity and Personal Identity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 57 (1):69 – 73.
  29. David Wood (2007). Time After Time. Indiana University Press.
    In Time After Time, David Wood accepts, without pessimism, the broad postmodern idea of the end of time. Wood exposes the rich, stratified, and non-linear textures of temporal complexity that characterize our world. Time includes breakdowns, repetitions, memories, and narratives that confuse a clear and open understanding of what it means to occupy time and space. In these thoughtful and powerful essays, Wood engages Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Heidegger, and Derrida to demonstrate how repetition can preserve sameness and how creativity can interrupt (...)
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  30.  4
    David W. Wood (2006). A Scientific Bible: Novalis and the Encyclopedistics of Nature. In K. Van Berkel A. Vanderjagt (ed.), The Book of Nature in Early Modern and Modern History. Peeters 167-180.
  31. David Wood (2005). Some Questions for My Levinasian Friends. In Eric Sean Nelson, Antje Kapust & Kent Still (eds.), Addressing Levinas. Northwestern University Press 152--169.
     
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  32.  8
    David Wood (1987). Beyond Deconstruction? Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 21:175-194.
    There are many people who think that deconstruction has run its course, has had its day, and that it is now time to return to the important business of philosophy, or perhaps to serious ethical, social and political questions. Derrida's work, it is said, leads nowhere but a sterile philosophy of difference that in its de-politicized, de-historicized abstractness is a form of conservatism little better than the kinds of identity thinking to which it seems to be so radically opposed. In (...)
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  33. Sarah Hulme, Peter Mitchell, David Wood, Michele Miozzo, Min Wang, Keiko Koda, Charles A. Perfetti, James R. Brockmole, Ranxiao Frances Wang & Jeffrey Lidz (2003). Linda B. Smith, Susan S. Jones, Hanako Yoshida and Eliana Colunga (Indiana University) Whose Dam Account? Attentional Learning Explains Booth and Waxman, 209–213. Cognition 87:237-239.
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  34. David Wood & José Medina (eds.) (2005). Truth: Engagements Across Philosophical Traditions. Blackwell Pub..
    Setting the stage with a selection of readings from important nineteenth century philosophers, this reader on truth puts in conversation some of the main philosophical figures from the twentieth century in the analytic, continental, and pragmatist traditions. Focuses on the value or normativity of truth through exposing the dialogues between different schools of thought Features philosophical figures from the twentieth century in the analytic, continental, and pragmatist traditions Topics addressed include the normative relation between truth and subjectivity, consensus, art, testimony, (...)
     
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  35. David Wood (2005). The Step Back: Ethics and Politics After Deconstruction. State University of New York Press.
    Explores the ethical and political possibilities of philosophy after deconstruction.
     
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  36.  1
    Joshua R. Gubler, Skye Herrick, Richard A. Price & David A. Wood (forthcoming). Violence, Aggression, and Ethics: The Link Between Exposure to Human Violence and Unethical Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics.
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  37.  2
    David W. Wood (2014). The 'Mathematical' Wissenschaftslehre: On a Late Fichtean Reflection of Novalis. In Dalia Nassar (ed.), The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy. Oxford University Press 258-272.
  38. David Wood (ed.) (1992). Derrida: A Critical Reader. Blackwell.
    Jacques Derrida's prolific output has been the delight of philosophers and literary theorists for over twenty years. His influence on the way we read theoretical texts continues to be profound. No serious contemporary thinker can fail to come to terms with deconstruction and there have been a number of monographs devoted to his work. Very few, however, have combined a critical edge with a detailed knowledge of his writing. The contributors to this volume were each asked - in the most (...)
     
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  39.  3
    David W. Wood (2013). Fichte's Conception of Infinity in the Bestimmung des Menschen. In Daniel Breazeale Tom Rockmore (ed.), Fichte’s Vocation of Man: New Interpretive and Critical Essays. State University of New York Press 155-171.
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  40.  23
    David Wood (2000). Ethos Beyond Ethics: Remarks on Charles Scott. Research in Phenomenology 30 (1):212-222.
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  41.  14
    David Wood (2006). On the Way to Econstruction. Environmental Philosophy 3 (1):35-46.
    Environmentalism finds itself facing problems and aporiae which deconstruction helps us address. But equally, environmental concerns can embolden deconstruction to embrace a strategic materialism – the essential interruptibility of every idealization. Moreover, deconstruction’s critique of presence opens us to the strange temporalities of environmentalism: needing to act before we have proof, and for the benefit of future humans. The history of the earth is a singular sequence, ideographic – concrete, not rule governed, and not to be repeated. French ‘anti-humanism’ is (...)
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  42. Lori Holder-Webb, Jeffrey Cohen, Leda Nath & David Wood (2008). A Survey of Governance Disclosures Among U.S. Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):543-563.
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  43. David Wood & Thomas Dutoit (1992). Passions: An Oblique Offering. In Derrida: A Critical Reader. Blackwell
     
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  44. David Wood (2002). Thinking After Heidegger. Polity.
    In _Thinking After Heidegger_, David Wood takes up the challenge posed by Heidegger - that after the end of philosophy we need to learn to _think_. But what if we read Heidegger with the same respectful irreverence that he brought to reading the Greeks, Kant, Hegel, Husserl and the others? For Wood, it is Derrida's engagements with Heidegger that set the standard here – enacting a repetition through transformation and displacement. But Wood is not content to crown the new king. (...)
     
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  45. David Wood (1999). The Experience of the Ethical. In Richard Kearney & Mark Dooley (eds.), Questioning Ethics: Contemporary Debates in Philosophy. Routledge 105--120.
     
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  46.  20
    David Wood (2002). Novalis (1772–1801): "Beginning", "Know Thy Self" and "When Numbers and Figures". Philosophical Forum 33 (3):318–325.
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  47. David Wood (1997). Much Obliged. Philosophy Today 41 (1):135-140.
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  48.  18
    David Wood (1994). Business Justice: Transactions, Resources, and Organisations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (6):481 - 486.
    This paper outlines an egalitarian theory of business justice, and indicates its requirements in respect of the central business institutions of transactions, resources and organisations.
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  49.  10
    David Wood (2012). Continental Philosophy: Back to the Future. Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (2):206-219.
    In its many interwoven traditions, continental philosophy has a distinctive focus on what escapes the concept—experience, change, agency, responsibility, the future, the Other. The challenges that face us in the future are many: reaffirming and renewing what has already been thought and needs repeating, responding to emergent questions. None could be more urgent than the question of the animal and the fate of the planet. Addressing each of these requires that we suspend our normal conceptual assurances and think anew.
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  50.  2
    David W. Wood (2013). On the Spirit and Letter of Rudolf Steiner's Philosophy: A Critical Reading of Hartmut Traub's 'Philosophie Und Anthroposophie'. RoSE: Research on Steiner Education 4 (1):181-201.
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