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  1.  6
    Irit Rogoff & David Van Leer (1993). Afterthoughts ... A Dossier on Masculinities. Theory and Society 22 (5):739-762.
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    David Van Leer (1989). The Beast of the Closet: Homosociality and the Pathology of Manhood. Critical Inquiry 15 (3):587-605.
    [Eve] Sedgwick examines from an explicitly feminist, implicitly Marxist perspective the relation of homosexuality to more general social bonds between members of the same sex . She argues that the similarity between homosocial desire and homosexuality lies at the root of much homophobia. Moreover, she sees this tension as misogynist to the extent that battles fought over patriarchy within the homosocial world automatically exclude women from that patriarchal power. Thus she places homosexuality and its attendant homophobia within a wider dynamic (...)
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  3. David Van Leer (1989). Trust and Trade. Critical Inquiry 15 (4):758-763.
    As presidential campaigns and “Saturday Night Live” have repeatedly demonstrated, debate is an uninteresting mode of communication, imitating dialogue without engaging in it. Formally it encourages infinite regress: my misreading of your misreading of my misreading of your misreading. Intellectually its conclusions are in some ways predetermined. In the short run, the winner is whoever speaks last; in the long run, whoever has the greater power. Rather than occasion or remark on further “shifty moments” , then, I will try to (...)
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  4.  20
    David van Leer (1986). Emerson's Epistemology: The Argument of the Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    Of the many nineteenth-century writers who have come to be known collectively as the American Renaissance, none, writes David Van Leer, 'aspired so relentlessly to the mantle of philosopher as did Ralph Waldo Emerson'. In this, the first book to treat Emerson as a serious philosopher, Dr Van Leer explores Emerson's interest in the subject, while remaining sensitive to the unfolding of Emerson's own complex career. He argues that Emerson's essays can be read quite seriously in terms of their philosophical (...)
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