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  1. Dean Cocking (forthcoming). Introduction to Book Symposium on Bernard Gert's Common Morality: Deciding What To Do (New York: Oxford University Press, 2004.). Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics.
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  2. Dean Cocking (forthcoming). Moral Arrogance and Moral Disagreement. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics.
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  3. Dean Cocking, Jeroen den Hoven & Job Timmermans (2012). Introduction: One Thousand Friends. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):179-184.
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  4. Dean Cocking, Jeroen van den Hoven & Job Timmermans (2012). Introduction: One Thousand Friends. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 14 (3):179-184.
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  5. Dean Cocking & Justin Oakley, Professional Interpretation and Judgement, and the Integrity of Lawyers.
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  6. Dean Cocking (2008). Plural Selves and Relational Identity: Intimacy and Privacy Online. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 123--141.
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  7. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (2005). Consequentialism, Complacency, and Slippery Slope Arguments. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 26 (3):227-239.
    The standard problem with many slippery slope arguments is that they fail to provide us with the necessary evidence to warrant our believing that the significantly morally worse circumstances they predict will in fact come about. As such these arguments have widely been criticised as ‘scare-mongering’. Consequentialists have traditionally been at the forefront of such criticisms, demanding that we get serious about guiding our prescriptions for right action by a comprehensive appreciation of the empirical facts. This is not surprising, since (...)
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  8. Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett (2003). Friendship and Role Morality. In Kim Chong Chong, Sor-Hoon Tan & C. L. Ten (eds.), The Moral Circle and the Self: Chinese and Western Approaches. Open Court.
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  9. Dean Cocking & Steve Matthews (2001). Unreal Friends. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (4):223-231.
    It has become quite common for people to develop `personal'' relationships nowadays, exclusively via extensive correspondence across the Net. Friendships, even romantic love relationships, are apparently, flourishing. But what kind of relations really are possible in this way? In this paper, we focus on the case of close friendship. There are various important markers that identify a relationship as one of close friendship. One will have, for instance, strong affection for the other, a disposition to act for their well-being and (...)
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  10. Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett (2000). Friendship and Moral Danger. Journal of Philosophy 97 (5):278-296.
    We focus here on some familiar kinds of cases of conflict between friendship and morality, and, on the basis of our account of the nature of friendship, argue for the following two claims: first, that in some cases where we are led morally astray by virtue of a relationship that makes its own demands on us, the relationship in question is properly called a friendship; second, that relationships of this kind are valuable in their own right.
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  11. Dean Cocking & Jeanette Kennett (1998). Friendship and the Self. Ethics 108 (3):502-527.
    We argue that companion friendship is not importantly marked by self-disclosure as understood in either of these two ways. One's close friends need not be markedly similar to oneself, as is claimed by the mirror account, nor is the role of private information in establishing and maintaining intimacy important in the way claimed by the secrets view. Our claim will be that the mirror and secrets views not only fail to identify features that are in part constitutive of close or (...)
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  12. Dean Cocking & Justin Oakley (1995). Indirect Consequentialism, Friendship, and the Problem of Alienation. Ethics 106 (1):86-111.
    In this article we argue that the worries about whether a consequentialist agent will be alienated from those who are special to her go deeper than has so far been appreciated. Rather than pointing to a problem with the consequentialist agent's motives or purposes, we argue that the problem facing a consequentialist agent in the case of friendship concerns the nature of the psychological disposition which such an agent would have and how this kind of disposition sits with those which (...)
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  13. Justin Oakley & Dean Cocking (1994). Consequentialism, Moral Responsibility, and the Intention/ Foresight Distinction. Utilitas 6 (02):201-.