Search results for 'Dean Lubin' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Dean Lubin (2009). External Reasons. Metaphilosophy 40 (2):273-291.
    Abstract: In this article I consider Bernard Williams's argument against the possibility of external reasons for action and his claim that the only reasons for action are therefore internal. Williams's argument appeals to David Hume's claim that reason is the slave of the passions, and to the idea that reasons are capable of motivating the agent who has them. I consider two responses to Williams's argument, by John McDowell and by Stephen Finlay. McDowell claims that even if Hume is right, (...)
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  2.  18
    Dean Lubin (2012). Goodman's New Riddle of Induction. Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (1):61-63.
    In this paper, I consider Goodman’s new riddle of induction and how we should best respond to it. Noticing that all the emeralds so far observed are green, we infer that all emeralds are green. However, all emeralds so far observed are also grue, so we could also infer that they are grue. Only one of these inductive inferences or projections could, however, be valid. For the hypothesis that all emeralds are green predicts that the next observed emerald will be (...)
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  3.  25
    William D. Dean (2010). Dean Replies to Zbaraschuk. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 31 (3):259-263.
    Michael Zbaraschuk’s recent article, “Not Radical Enough: William Dean’s Problems with God and History,”1 deserves a published response, because it applies not only to my work but to that of many other philosophical theologians, some of whom read this journal. Before discussing the larger issues, I must attend to an item of scholarly housekeeping. Although Zbaraschuk draws narrowly, i.e., from only two of my books—History Making History (1988) and The Religious Critic in American Culture (1994)—he applies his arguments indiscriminately (...)
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  4. Richard Dean (2006). The Value of Humanity in Kant's Moral Theory. Oxford University Press.
    The humanity formulation of Kant's Categorical Imperative demands that we treat humanity as an end in itself. Because this principle resonates with currently influential ideals of human rights and dignity, contemporary readers often find it compelling, even if the rest of Kant's moral philosophy leaves them cold. Moreover, some prominent specialists in Kant's ethics have recently turned to the humanity formulation as the most theoretically central and promising principle of Kant's ethics. Nevertheless, it has received less attention than many other (...)
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  5. Stephen Carter, William Dean, Jean Bethke Elshtain, Robin W. Lovin & Cornel West (1997). The Culture of Disbelief: How American Law and Politics Trivialize Religious Devotion. Journal of Religious Ethics 25 (2):367-392.
    Recent critics have called attention to the alienation of contemporary academics from broad currents of intellectual activity in public culture. The general complaint is that intellectuals are finding a professional home in institutions of higher learning, insulated from the concerns and interests of a wider reading audience. The demands of professional expertise do not encourage academics to work as public intellectuals or to take up social, literary, or political matters in imaginative and perspicuous ways. More problematic is the relative absence (...)
     
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  6.  3
    Richard Dean (2015). Carla Bagnoli , Constructivism in Ethics Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013 Pp. 267 ISBN 9781107019218 $95.00. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 20 (1):145-150.
    Book Reviews Richard Dean, Kantian Review, FirstView Article.
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  7.  5
    Laura Dean & Jesse McClelland (2013). Ballard: A Portrait of Placemaking. Continent 3 (2):40-42.
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  8. Leonard Dean (1980). Theory and the Muddle. Critical Inquiry 6 (4):752-755.
    Editor's Note: We are happy to print the following comment by Leonard Dean as a reminder that the arbitrary, improvisatory nature of practical criticism has its origins in a much more homely and familiar phenomenon. A muddler naturally feels flattered by any kind of praise from the world of theory, as, for example, by Robert Scholes' generous remark that "muddling along, in literary theory as in life, is often more humane and even more efficient than the alternatives offered by (...)
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  9. D. Cornell & J. Dean (1998). Exploring the Imaginary Domain. Philosophy and Social Criticism 24 (2-3):173-198.
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  10. Jeremy Avigad, Edward Dean & John Mumma (2009). A Formal System for Euclid's Elements. Review of Symbolic Logic 2 (4):700--768.
    We present a formal system, E, which provides a faithful model of the proofs in Euclid's Elements, including the use of diagrammatic reasoning.
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  11. Kathryn Dean (2006). Agency and Dialectics: What Critical Realism Can Learn From Althusser's Marxism. In Realism, Philosophy and Social Science. Palgrave Macmillan 123--147.
     
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  12. Richard Dean (2010). Does Neuroscience Undermine Deontological Theory? Neuroethics 3 (1):43-60.
    Joshua Greene has argued that several lines of empirical research, including his own fMRI studies of brain activity during moral decision-making, comprise strong evidence against the legitimacy of deontology as a moral theory. This is because, Greene maintains, the empirical studies establish that “characteristically deontological” moral thinking is driven by prepotent emotional reactions which are not a sound basis for morality in the contemporary world, while “characteristically consequentialist” thinking is a more reliable moral guide because it is characterized by greater (...)
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  13. Mitchell Dean (1996). Putting the Technological Into Government. History of the Human Sciences 9 (3):47-68.
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  14. Mitchell Dean (1986). Foucault's Obsession with Western Modernity. Thesis Eleven 14 (1):44-61.
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  15.  19
    Peter J. Dean (1992). Making Codes of Ethics 'Real'. Journal of Business Ethics 11 (4):285 - 290.
    This article outlines a training activity that can enable both business and governmental professionals to translate the principles in a code of ethics to a specific list of company-related behaviors ranging from highly ethical to highly unethical. It also explores how this list can become a concrete model to follow in making ethical decisions. The article begins with a discussion as to what will improve ethical decision making in business and government. This leads us to explore the factors that can (...)
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  16.  58
    J. Dean (2005). Book Review: Review Essay: Enemies Imaginary and Symbolic. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 31 (4):499-509.
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  17. James C. Anderson & Jeffrey T. Dean (1998). Moderate Autonomism. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (2):150-166.
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  18.  62
    W. Dean & H. Kurokawa (2010). From the Knowability Paradox to the Existence of Proofs. Synthese 176 (2):177 - 225.
    The Knowability Paradox purports to show that the controversial but not patently absurd hypothesis that all truths are knowable entails the implausible conclusion that all truths are known. The notoriety of this argument owes to the negative light it appears to cast on the view that there can be no verification-transcendent truths. We argue that it is overly simplistic to formalize the views of contemporary verificationists like Dummett, Prawitz or Martin-Löf using the sort of propositional modal operators which are employed (...)
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  19.  20
    W. Dean (2014). Models and Computability. Philosophia Mathematica 22 (2):143-166.
    Computationalism holds that our grasp of notions like ‘computable function’ can be used to account for our putative ability to refer to the standard model of arithmetic. Tennenbaum's Theorem has been repeatedly invoked in service of this claim. I will argue that not only do the relevant class of arguments fail, but that the result itself is most naturally understood as having the opposite of a reference-fixing effect — i.e., rather than securing the determinacy of number-theoretic reference, Tennenbaum's Theorem points (...)
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  20.  14
    Kathy Lund Dean, Jeri Mullins Beggs & Timothy P. Keane (2010). Mid-Level Managers, Organizational Context, and (Un)Ethical Encounters. Journal of Business Ethics 97 (1):51–69.
    This article details day-to-day ethics issues facing MBAs who occupy entry-level and mid-level management positions and offers defined examples of the stressors these managers face. The study includes lower-level managers, essentially excluded from extant literature, and focuses on workplace behaviors both undertaken and observed. Results indicate that pressures from internal organization sources, and ambiguity in letter versus spirit of rules, account for over a third of the most frequent unethical situations encountered, and that most managers did not expect to face (...)
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  21.  7
    Jeri Mullins Beggs & Kathy Lund Dean (2007). Legislated Ethics or Ethics Education?: Faculty Views in the Post-Enron Era. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (1):15 - 37.
    The tension between external forces for better ethics in organizations, represented by legislation such as the Sarbanes–Oxley Act (SOX), and the call for internal forces represented by increased educational coverage, has never been as apparent. This study examines business school faculty attitudes about recent corporate ethics lapses, including opinions about root causes, potential solutions, and ethics coverage in their courses. In assessing root causes, faculty point to a failure of systems such as legal/professional and management (external) and declining personal values (...)
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  22.  15
    S. DewhurSt, S. HolmeS, K. Brandt & G. Dean (2006). Measuring the Speed of the Conscious Components of Recognition Memory: Remembering is Faster Than Knowing. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):147-162.
    Three experiments investigated response times for remember and know responses in recognition memory. RTs to remember responses were faster than RTs to know responses, regardless of whether the remember–know decision was preceded by an old/new decision or was made without a preceding old/new decision . The finding of faster RTs for R responses was also found when remember–know decisions were made retrospectively. These findings are inconsistent with dual-process models of recognition memory, which predict that recollection is slower and more effortful (...)
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  23.  9
    Pamela Yeow, Alison Dean & Danielle Tucker (2013). Bags for Life: The Embedding of Ethical Consumerism. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):1-13.
    The aim of this paper is to understand why some ethical behaviours fail to embed, and importantly what can be done about it. We address this by looking at an example where ethical behaviour has not become the norm, i.e. the widespread, habitual, use of ‘bags for life’. This is an interesting case because whilst a consistent message of ‘saving the environment’ has been the basis of the promotion of ‘bags for life’ in the United Kingdom for many years, their (...)
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  24. J. Dean (1994). Review Essay : Beyond the Equality/Difference dilemmaDrucilla Cornell, Beyond Accommodation: Ethical Feminism, Deconstruction and the Law (New York: Routledge, 1991) Mary Joe Frug, Postmodern Legal Feminism (New York: Routledge, 1992) Patricia J. Williams, The Alchemy of Race and Rights (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991). [REVIEW] Philosophy and Social Criticism 20 (1-2):155-170.
  25.  96
    J. Dean (1992). Including Women: The Consequences and Side Effects of Feminist Critiques of Civil Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):379-406.
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  26. Geoffrey O. Dean & Ivan W. Kelly (2003). Is Astrology Relevant to Consciousness and Psi? Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (6):175-198.
    Abstract: Many astrologers attribute a successful birth-chart reading to what they call intuition or psychic ability,where the birth chart acts like a crystal ball. As in shamanism,they relate consciousness to a transcendent reality that,if true, might require are-assessment of present biological theories of consciousness.In Western countries roughly 1 person in 10,000 is practising or seriously studying astrology, so their total number is substantial. Many tests of astrologers have been made since the 1950s but only recently has a coherent review been (...)
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  27.  9
    Dwane Hal Dean (2004). Perceptions of the Ethicality of Consumer Insurance Claim Fraud. Journal of Business Ethics 54 (1):67-79.
    It was proposed that ethical evaluation of insurance claim padding behavior would be affected by characteristics of the policyholder, insurance agent, and company. These three factors were manipulated in written scenarios and the premise was tested in a factorial experimental design. No significant support was found for an effect of any of the three factors on ethical perceptions of claim padding. However, females found claims padding to be significantly less ethical than males. Given a claim scenario where the actual loss (...)
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  28.  15
    Walter Dean & Hidenori Kurokawa (2014). The Paradox of the Knower Revisited. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 165 (1):199-224.
    The Paradox of the Knower was originally presented by Kaplan and Montague [26] as a puzzle about the everyday notion of knowledge in the face of self-reference. The paradox shows that any theory extending Robinson arithmetic with a predicate K satisfying the factivity axiom K → A as well as a few other epistemically plausible principles is inconsistent. After surveying the background of the paradox, we will focus on a recent debate about the role of epistemic closure principles in the (...)
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  29. Kathryn Dean (ed.) (2006). Realism, Philosophy and Social Science. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The authors examine the nature of the relationship between social science and philosophy and address the sort of work social science should do, and the role and sorts of claims that an accompanying philosophy should engage in. In particular, the authors reintroduce the question of ontology, an area long overlooked by philosophers of social science, and present a cricital engagement with the work of Roy Bhaskar. The book argues against the excesses of philosophising and commits itself to a philosophical approach (...)
     
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  30. Jodi Dean (2003). Why the Net is Not a Public Sphere. Constellations 10 (1):95-112.
  31.  65
    Jodi Dean (2001). Publicity's Secret. Political Theory 29 (5):624-650.
  32.  64
    Jeffrey T. Dean (2003). The Nature of Concepts and the Definition of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 61 (1):29–35.
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  33.  1
    Janice Dean (2001). Public Companies as Social Institutions. Business Ethics 10 (4):302–310.
    Many UK public companies invest considerable resources in charitable donations and community involvement. Using semi‐structured interviews with public company officers, the author sought to investigate the motivations behind this activity. Was it undertaken because of an expectation of commercial benefit, out of a sense of obligation, or for other reasons? It appeared that public companies were increasingly anxious to make connections between corporate activity in the community and business activities. Public companies linked with local communities clearly felt a sense of (...)
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  34. Jodi Dean (2008). Change of Address : Butler's Ethics at Sovereignty's Deadlock. In Terrell Carver & Samuel Allen Chambers (eds.), Judith Butler's Precarious Politics: Critical Encounters. Routledge
  35. Jodi Dean (2013). Machine Generated Contents Note: 1.Communist Desire. In Amy Swiffen & Joshua Nichols (eds.), The Ends of History: Questioning the Stakes of Historical Reason. Routledge
     
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  36.  47
    Richard Dean (2000). Cummiskey's Kantian Consequentialism. Utilitas 12 (1):25.
    In Kantian Consequentialism, David Cummiskey argues that the central ideas of Kant's moral philosophy provide claims about value which, if applied consistently, lead to consequentialist normative principles. While Kant himself was not a consequentialist, Cummiskey thinks he should have been, given his fundamental positions in ethics. I argue that Cummiskey is mistaken. Cummiskey's argument relies on a non-Kantian idea about value, namely that value can be defined, and objects with value identified, conceptually prior to and independent of the choices that (...)
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  37.  32
    Jodi Dean (2000). Theorizing Conspiracy Theory. Theory and Event 4 (3).
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  38.  12
    Jodi Dean, James Martel & Davide Panagia (2010). Introduction. Theory and Event 13 (1).
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  39.  12
    Davide Panagia & Jodi Dean (2011). Introduction. Theory and Event 14 (1).
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  40.  40
    Richard Dean (2013). Humanity as an Idea, as an Ideal, and as an End in Itself. Kantian Review 18 (2):171-195.
    Kant emphasizes that moral philosophy must be divided into two parts, a metaphysics of morals, and an empirical application to individuals, which Kant calls 'moral anthropology'. But Kant gives humanity (die Menschheit) a prominent role even in the purely rational part of ethics – for example, one formulation of the categorical imperative is a demand to treat humanity as an end in itself. This paper argues that the only concepts of humanity suited to play such a role are the rational (...)
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  41.  24
    Peter J. Dean (1997). Examining the Profession and the Practice of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (15):1637-1649.
    During the evolution of business ethics as a profession, the fields it draws from have identified separate knowledge and skills they believe define business ethics; however, there is little agreement among these fields. This means the strengths of each are seldom combined to guide ethical decision making in business and industry, which leaves business ethicists looking less effective, and perhaps less professional, than their counter-parts in medicine and law. It also means that those who have been thrust into the role (...)
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  42.  13
    Tim Dean (2004). Art as Symptom: Žižek and the Ethics of Psychoanalytic Criticism. Diacritics 32 (2):21-41.
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  43.  16
    Tim Dean (2003). Lacan and Queer Theory. In Jean-Michel Rabaté (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Lacan. Cambridge University Press 238--52.
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  44.  9
    Mitchell Dean (1992). Pateman's Dilemma. Theory and Society 21 (1):121-130.
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  45.  8
    Jonathan Dean (2008). Feminist Purism and the Question of |[Lsquo]|Radicality|[Rsquo]| in Contemporary Political Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 7 (3):280.
    This paper operates on the premise that a systematic formulation of ‘radicality’ is a worthwhile and potentially productive exercise within political theory. However, I argue that one continues to find a latent ‘purism’ within contemporary understandings of ‘radicality’, primarily in relation to feminism, but also elsewhere. This manifests itself in the tendency to think ‘radicality’ as a function of the inherent properties of particular types of political spaces and political practices. Within feminism, for example, I argue that the ‘radicality’ of (...)
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  46.  18
    Hartley Dean (2011). The Ethics of Migrant Welfare. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (1):18-35.
    International migration poses a dilemma for capitalist welfare states. This paper considers the ethical dimensions of that dilemma. It begins by addressing two questions associated with the provision of social rights for migrants: first, the extent to which differential forms of social citizenship may be associated with processes of civic stratification; second, the ambiguous nature of the economic, social and cultural rights components of the international human rights framework. It then proceeds to discuss, on the one hand, existing attempts to (...)
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  47.  15
    Patricia J. Faulkender, Lillian M. Range, Michelle Hamilton, Marlow Strehlow, Sarah Jackson, Elmer Blanchard & Paul Dean (1994). The Case of the Stolen Psychology Test: An Analysis of an Actual Cheating Incident. Ethics and Behavior 4 (3):209 – 217.
    We examined the attitudes of 600 students in large introductory algebra and psychology classes toward an actual or hypothetical cheating incident and the subsequent retake procedure. Overall, 57% of students in one class and 49Y0 in the other reported that they either cheated or would have cheated if given the opportunity. More men (59%) than women (53%) reported cheating or potential cheating. Students who had actually experienced a retake procedure to handle cheating were more satisfied with such a procedure than (...)
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  48. Timothy Lubin (2005). The Transmission, Patronage, and Prestige of Brahmanical Piety From the Mauryas to the Guptas. In Federico Squarcini (ed.), Boundaries, Dynamics and Construction of Traditions in South Asia. Firenze University Press and Munshiram Manoharlal 77--103.
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  49.  3
    Mitchell Dean (2002). Powers of Life and Death Beyond Governmentality. Cultural Values 6 (1-2):119-138.
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  50.  9
    Dennis R. Dean (1993). The San Francisco Earthquake of 1906. Annals of Science 50 (6):501-521.
    Though among the most famous earthquakes in modern times, San Francisco has almost always been presented as nothing more than a great human disaster. While certainly that, we should regard it also as having had unusual significance in the development of seismology. Because the full extent of the San Andreas fault was thereafter recognized, and the association between faulting and earthquakes confirmed, we may consider the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 to be the first in which modern understanding of seismic (...)
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