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Deane Curtin [10]Deane W. Curtin [2]
  1. Spencer Abraham, Ray Anderson, Nik Ansell, St Thomas Aquinas, St Francis of Assisi, William Baxter, Philip J. Bentley, Joachim Blatter, Murray Bookchin, Maya Brennan, Majora Carter, Carl Cohen, Deane Curtin, Herman Daly, David DeGrazia, Bill Devall, Calvin DeWitt, David Ehrenfeld, Paul, Anne Ehrlich, Robert Elliot, Stuart Ewen, Nuria Fernandez, Stephen Gardiner, Ramachandra Guha, Garrett Hardin, Eugene Hargrove, John Hasse, Po-Keung Ip, Ralf Isenmann, Kauser Jahan, Marianne B. Karsh, Andrew Kernohan, Marti Kheel, Kenneth Kraft, Aldo Leopold, Miriam MacGillis, Juan Martinez-Alier, Ed McGaa, Katie McShane, Roberto Mechoso, Arne Naess, Seyyed Hossein Nasr, Michael Nelson, Bryan Norton, Philip Nyhus, John O'Neil, Stephen Pacala, Ernest Partridge, Erv Peterson, Tom Regan, Holmes Rolston Iii, Lily-Marlene Russow, Mark Sagoff, Kristin Schrader-Frechette, Erroll Schweizer, George Sessions, Vandana Shiva, Peter Singer, Stephen Socolow, Paul Steidlmeier, Richard Sylvan, Bron Taylor & Paul Taylor (2009). Earthcare: An Anthology in Environmental Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  2. Deane Curtin (2007). Teaching Environmental Ethics. Environmental Ethics 29 (4):423-426.
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  3. Deane Curtin (2004). Daoism and Ecology: Ways Within a Cosmic Landscape. Environmental Ethics 26 (1):105-106.
  4. Deane Curtin (2003). Being Human: Ethics, Environment, and Our Place in Nature. Environmental Ethics 25 (2):199-202.
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  5. Deane Curtin (1997). Women's Knowledge as Expert Knowledge. In Karen Warren (ed.), Ecofeminism: Women, Culture, Nature. Indiana Univ Pr. 82--98.
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  6. Deane Curtin (1996). A State of Mind Like Water: Ecosophy T and the Buddhist Traditions. Inquiry 39 (2):239 – 253.
    Arne Naess has come under many influences, most notably Gandhi and Spinoza. The Buddhist influence on his work, though less pervasive, provides the most direct account of key deep ecological concepts such as Self?realization and intrinsic value. I read Ecosophy T as a rigorously phenomenological branch of Deep Ecology. like early Buddhism, Naess responds to the human suffering that causes environmental destruction by challenging us to return to the reality of lived experience. This Buddhist reading clarifies, but it also complicates. (...)
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  7. Deane Curtin (1995). Making Peace with the Earth: Indigenous Agriculture and the Green Revolution. Environmental Ethics 17 (1):59-73.
    Since its inception in the years following World War II, the green revolution has been defended, not just as a technical program designed to alleviate world hunger, but on moral grounds as a program to achieve world peace. In this paper, I dispute the moral claim to a politics of peace, arguing instead that the green revolution is warist in its treatment of the environment and indigenous communities, and that the agricultural practices that the green revolution was designed to supplant—principally (...)
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  8. Deane Curtin (1994). Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do not fully (...)
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  9. John Powers & Deane Curtin (1994). Mothering: Moral Cultivation in Buddhist and Feminist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 44 (1):1-18.
  10. Deane W. Curtin & Lisa M. Heldke (eds.) (1992). Cooking, Eating, Thinking: Transformative Philosophies of Food. Indiana University Press.
    Philosophy has often been criticized for privileging the abstract; this volume attempts to remedy that situation. Focusing on one of the most concrete of human concerns, food, the editors argue for the existence of a philosophy of food.
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  11. Deane Curtin (1991). Toward an Ecological Ethic of Care. Hypatia 6 (1):60 - 74.
    This paper argues that the language of rights cannot express distinctively ecofeminist insights into the treatment of nonhuman animals and the environment. An alternative is proposed in the form of a politicized ecological ethic of care which can express ecofeminist insights. The paper concludes with consideration of an ecofeminist moral issue: how we choose to understand ourselves morally in relation to what we are willing to count as food. "Contextual moral vegetarianism" represents a response to a politicized ecological ethic of (...)
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  12. Deane W. Curtin (1982). Varieties of Aesthetic Formalism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 40 (3):315-326.
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