Search results for 'Death and Dying' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Social-Symbolic Death (forthcoming). Dying as a Social-Symbolic Process. Humanitas.
     
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  2.  3
    Christina Marsden Gillis (2006). “Seeing the Difference”: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Death, Dying, Humanities, and Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (2):105-115.
    This essay explores how strategies integral to inquiry in the humanities provide insights into developing an interdisciplinary approach to studies of death and dying that will be relevant to medical practice as well as to humanistic study. The author asks how we can produce new modes of knowledge in an area where “knowing” is highly problematized and argues that while a putative field of death and dying studies must include a range of disciplinary approaches it must (...)
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  3.  11
    Violet Handtke & Tenzin Wangmo (2014). Ageing Prisoners’ Views on Death and Dying: Contemplating End-of-Life in Prison. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):373-386.
    Rising numbers of ageing prisoners and goals on implementing equivalent health care in prison raise issues surrounding end-of-life care for prisoners. The paucity of research on this topic in Europe means that the needs of older prisoners contemplating death in prison have not been established. To investigate elderly prisoners’ attitudes towards death and dying, 35 qualitative interviews with inmates aged 51 to 71 years were conducted in 12 Swiss prisons. About half of the prisoners reported having thought (...)
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  4.  49
    C. A. Stevens & R. Hassan (1994). Management of Death, Dying and Euthanasia: Attitudes and Practices of Medical Practitioners in South Australia. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):41-46.
    This article presents the first results of a study of the decisions made by health professionals in South Australia concerning the management of death, dying, and euthanasia, and focuses on the findings concerning the attitudes and practices of medical practitioners. Mail-back, self-administered questionnaires were posted in August 1991 to a ten per cent sample of 494 medical practitioners in South Australia randomly selected from the list published by the Medical Board of South Australia. A total response rate of (...)
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  5.  60
    Pablo Rodríguez Del Pozo & Joseph Fins (2005). Death, Dying and Informatics: Misrepresenting Religion on MedLine. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-5.
    Background The globalization of medical science carries for doctors worldwide a correlative duty to deepen their understanding of patients' cultural contexts and religious backgrounds, in order to satisfy each as a unique individual. To become better informed, practitioners may turn to MedLine, but it is unclear whether the information found there is an accurate representation of culture and religion. To test MedLine's representation of this field, we chose the topic of death and dying in the three major monotheistic (...)
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  6.  29
    Felicia Ackerman (1999). Death, Dying, and Dignity. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:189-201.
    The word ‘dignity’ is a staple of contemporary American medical ethics, where it often follows the words ‘death with’. People unfamiliar with this usage might expect it to apply to one’s manner of dying—for example, a stately exit involving ceremonial farewells. Instead, conventional usage generally holds that “death with dignity” ends or prevents life without dignity, by which is meant life marked not by buffoonery, but by illness and disability. Popular examples of dignity-depleters include dementia, incontinence, and (...)
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  7.  6
    Iona Heath (2012). Living, Dying and the Nature of Death. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1079-1081.
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  8. Robert M. Veatch (1976). Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution Our Last Quest for Responsibility. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  9. Alok Pandey (2006). Death, Dying, and Beyond. Sri Aurobindo Institute of Research in Social Sciences, Sri Aurobindo Society.
     
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  10.  15
    Franklin G. Miller & Robert Truog (2011). Death, Dying, and Organ Donation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. Oxford University Press.
    This book challenges fundamental doctrines of established medical ethics. It is argued that the routine practice of stopping life support technology causes the death of patients and that donors of vital organs (hearts, liver, lungs, and both kidneys) are not really dead at the time that their organs are removed for life-saving transplantation. Although these practices are ethically legitimate, they are not compatible with traditional medical ethics: they conflict with the norms that doctors must not intentionally cause the (...) of their patients and that vital organs can be obtained only from dead donors. The aim of this book is to undertake an ethical examination that aims to honestly face the reality of medical practices at the end of life. This involves exposing the misconception that stopping life support merely allows patients to die from their medical conditions, that there is an ethical bright line separating withdrawal of life support from active euthanasia, and that determination of death of hospitalized patients prior to vital organ donation is consistent with the established biological conception of death. A novel ethical justification is required for procuring vital organs from still-living donors. It is contended that in the context of plans to withdraw life support, donors of vital organs are not harmed or wronged by organ procurement prior to death, provided that valid consent is obtained for stopping treatment and organ donation. In view of serious practical difficulties in facing the truth regarding organ donation, an alternative pragmatic account is developed for justifying current practices that relies on the concept of transparent legal fictions. In sum, it is the thesis of this book that to preserve the legitimacy of end-of-life practices, we need to reconstruct medical ethics. (shrink)
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  11. Father Nikolaos Hatzinikolaou (2003). Prolonging Life or Hindering Death? An Orthodox Perspective on Death, Dying and Euthanasia. Christian Bioethics 9 (2):187-201.
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  12.  24
    I. H. Kerridge (2002). Death, Dying and Donation: Organ Transplantation and the Diagnosis of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):89.
    Refusal of organ donation is common, and becoming more frequent. In Australia refusal by families occurred in 56% of cases in 1995 in New South Wales, and had risen to 82% in 1999, becoming the most important determinant of the country's very low organ donation rate .Leading causes of refusal, identified in many studies, include the lack of understanding by families of brain death and its implications, and subsequent reluctance to relegate the body to purely instrumental status. It is (...)
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  13.  37
    Antonio Calcagno (2008). Being, Aevum , and Nothingness: Edith Stein on Death and Dying. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):59-72.
    This article seeks to present for the first time a more systematic account of Edith Stein’s views on death and dying. First, I will argue that death does not necessarily lead us to an understanding of our earthly existence as aevum, that is, an experience of time between eternity and finite temporality. We always bear the mark of our finitude, including our finite temporality, even when we exist within the eternal mind of God. To claim otherwise, is (...)
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  14.  6
    Erich H. Loewy (1999). Physician Assisted Dying and Death with Dignity: Missed Opportunities and Prior Neglected Conditions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):189-194.
    This paper argues that the world-wide debate about physician assisted dying is missing a golden opportunity to focus on the orchestration of the end of life. Such a process consists of far more than adequate pain control and is a skill which, like all other skills, needs to be learned and taught. The debate offers an opportunity to press for the teaching of this skill. Beyond this, the desire to assure that all can have access to palliative care makes (...)
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  15. Adam Buben (2011). Christian Hate: Death, Dying, and Reason in Pascal and Kierkegaard. In Patrick Stokes & Adam Buben (eds.), Kierkegaard and Death. Indiana University Press
     
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  16.  6
    Claire Leimbach (2009). The Intimacy of Death and Dying: Simple Guidance to Help You Through. Inpsired Living/Allen & Unwin.
    Offers over forty stories about individuals who have dealt with the loss of a loved one, and advice on handling situations surrounding death and dying such as talking with children about grief, suicide, and funeral arrangements.
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  17. Christina Staudt (2009). From Concealment to Recognition : The Discourse on Death, Dying, and Grief. In Michael K. Bartalos (ed.), Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger
     
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  18.  16
    D. Dooley-Clarke (1978). Death, Dying and the Biological Revolution. Philosophical Studies 26:340-341.
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  19.  78
    G. Bolton (2004). Editorial: Death, Dying, and Bereavement. Medical Humanities 30 (1):49-49.
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  20.  33
    N. Hatzinikolaou (2003). Prolonging Life or Hindering Death? An Orthodox Perspective on Death, Dying and Euthanasia. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):187-201.
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  21.  9
    William C. Charron (1978). "Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution," by Robert M. Veatch. Modern Schoolman 55 (3):305-307.
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  22.  7
    L. Hockey (1997). Death, Dying and Residential Care. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):258-258.
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  23.  9
    Benjamin E. Hippen (2012). Review of F. G. Miller and R. D. Truog,Death, Dying and Organ Transplantation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):56-58.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 56-58, June 2012.
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  24.  13
    Philip Merlan (1964). Death, Dying, and Immortality: Some Contemporary Categories. World Futures 3 (1):3-45.
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  25.  8
    David H. Jones (1989). Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution. Review of Metaphysics 43 (2):426-428.
  26.  5
    R. Lamerton (1977). Death, Dying and the Biological Revolution. Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (4):194-195.
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  27.  9
    Mark G. Kuczewski (2004). Re-Reading On Death & Dying: What Elisabeth Kubler-Ross Can Teach Clinical Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):W18-W23.
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  28.  3
    Ralf J. Jox (2014). Sketching the Alternative to Brain Death: Dying Through Organ Donation. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):37-39.
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  29.  7
    J. Pritchard (1997). Euthanasia: Death, Dying and the Medical Duty. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):256-257.
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  30.  2
    Pablo Rodríguez Del Pozo & Joseph J. Fins (2005). Death, Dying and Informatics: Misrepresenting Religion on MedLine. BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):6.
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  31.  1
    Steven Carter (2004). The Nothing That is and the Nothing That is Not: On Death, Dying, and Suffering. Upa.
    The Nothing That Is and the Nothing That Is Not is the final volume in a trilogy on interpretations of otherness in the postmodern era. The first two volumes are A Do-It-Yourself Dystopia: The Americanization of Big Brother and Leopards in the Temple: Selected Essays 1990-2000.
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  32. Robert J. Comiskey (1978). Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution by Robert M. Veatch. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 21 (4):635-637.
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  33. Harold P. Cooke (1933). Death, Dying and Survival. Hibbert Journal 32:596.
     
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  34. M. A. Eby (1997). Book Review: Euthanasia: Death, Dying and the Medical Duty. [REVIEW] Nursing Ethics 4 (1):88-89.
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  35. M. A. Eby (1997). Dunstan GR, Lachmann PJ Eds, Euthanasia: Death, Dying and the Medical Duty. Nursing Ethics 4:88-88.
     
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  36. Robert J. Henle (1977). Robert M. Veatch, "Death, Dying, and the Biological Revolution". [REVIEW] The Thomist 41 (3):456.
     
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  37. Sheila A. M. Mclean (1996). Death, Dying and the Law. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  38. John Morgan (1996). An Easeful Death? Perspectives on Death, Dying, and Euthanasia. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  39. John D. Morgan (forthcoming). The Teaching of Palliative Care Within the Context of an Undergraduate Course on Death, Dying, and Bereavement. Journal of Palliative Care.
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  40.  4
    William Gavin (2016). For Whom the Bell Tolls: Jamesian and Deweyian Reflections on Death and Dying. The Pluralist 11 (1):19-38.
    In this paper, I describe some current developments in death and dying literature—certainty vs. context; death as process vs. death as event; acceptance vs. denial; and the present moment vs. the long run. I then show how the work of James and Dewey can be beneficially applied to these topics. In this way, I hope to be true to the spirit of James and Dewey, following in their “wake,” while extending their insights to a new topic, (...)
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  41.  91
    S. Ost (2011). Physician-Assisted Dying Outlaws: Self-Appointed Death in the Netherlands. Clinical Ethics 6 (1):20-26.
    No law in any jurisdiction that permits physician assisted dying offers individuals a medically assisted death without the need to comply with certain criteria. The Netherlands is no exception. There is evidence to suggest that physicians are averse to providing an assisted death even when the Dutch ‘due care criteria’ have been met and the unbearable pain and suffering requirement is especially difficult to satisfy. Some individuals with an enduring desire to die who do not meet the (...)
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  42.  6
    Fu-Jin Shih, Meei-Ling Gau, Yaw-Sheng Lin, Suang-Jing Pong & Hung-Ru Lin (2006). Death and Help Expected From Nurses When Dying. Nursing Ethics 13 (4):360-375.
    This project was undertaken to ascertain the perceptions of a group of Taiwan’s fourth-year bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students regarding death and help expected from nurses during the dying process. Within the Chinese culture, death is one of the most important life issues. However, in many Chinese societies it is difficult for people to reveal their deepest feelings to their significant others or loved ones. It was in this context that this project was developed because (...)
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  43.  9
    David Evans (2007). Seeking an Ethical and Legal Way of Procuring Transplantable Organs From the Dying Without Further Attempts to Redefine Human Death. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):11.
    Because complex organs taken from unequivocally dead people are not suitable for transplantation, human death has been redefined so that it can be certified at some earlier stage in the dying process and thereby make viable organs available without legal problems. Redefinitions based on concepts of.
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  44.  6
    Erich H. Loewy (1988). Oh Death, Where is Thy Sting? Reflections on Dealing with Dying Patients. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):135-142.
    This paper examines the reactions of physicians and other health-professionals when they become involved in decisions about the death of their patients. The way people understand the condition of death has a profound influence on attitudes towards death and dying issues. Four traditional views of death are explored. The problem that physicians have in helping patients die (be it by hastening death through pain control, assisting patients in suicide or by more active means) is (...)
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  45.  4
    B. Wannenwetsch (2011). From Ars Moriendi to Assisted Suicide: Bonhoefferian Explorations Into Cultures of Death and Dying. Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (4):428-440.
    The essay is intended to shed light on the back-stage of contemporary debates about death and the dying, and more specifically on newer trends that emphasise the importance of ‘dying well’ and the moral viability of a ‘good death’. It raises the question as to whether there is a hidden conceptual link between the high medieval tradition of ars moriendi and the modern trend towards embracing (assisted) suicide as a final expression of human autonomy and suggests (...)
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  46.  2
    J. McCarthy, J. Weafer & M. Loughrey (2010). Irish Views on Death and Dying: A National Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):454-458.
    Objective To determine the public's understanding of and views about a range of ethical issues in relation to death and dying. Design Random, digit-dialling, telephone interview Setting Ireland. Participants 667 adult individuals. Results The general public are unfamiliar with terms associated with end-of-life care. Although most want to be informed if they have a terminal illness, they also value family support in this regard. Most of the respondents believe that competent patients have the right to refuse life-saving treatment. (...)
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  47. Paul B. Bascom, David DeGrazia, Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Kathleen Foley, Herbert Hendin, Michael Panicola, Stephen G. Post, Susan W. Tolle & Charles von Gunten (2004). Death and Dying: A Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    Edited by Thomas A. Shannon, this series provides anthologies of critical essays and reflections by leading ethicists in four pivotal areas: reproductive technologies, genetic technologies, death and dying, and health care policy. The goal of this series is twofold: first, to provide a set of readers on thematic topics for introductory or survey courses in bioethics or for courses with a particular theme or time limitation. Second, each of the readers in this series is designed to help students (...)
     
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  48.  3
    Andrew Fagan (2004). Making Sense Of: Dying and Death. Rodopi.
    This book aims to extend upon the growing body of literature concerned with dying and death. The book analyses various experiences and representations of dying and death from the perspective of academic disciplines as diverse as theology, philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and literature. The rationale for this is simple. As objects of study dying and death cannot be usefully reduced to a single academic perspective. One cannot hope to gain a deep and comprehensive understanding of (...)
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  49. Thomas A. Shannon (ed.) (2004). Death and Dying: A Reader. Sheed & Ward.
    Edited by Thomas A. Shannon, this series provides anthologies of critical essays and reflections by leading ethicists in four pivotal areas: reproductive technologies, genetic technologies, death and dying, and health care policy. The goal of this series is twofold: first, to provide a set of readers on thematic topics for introductory or survey courses in bioethics or for courses with a particular theme or time limitation. Second, each of the readers in this series is designed to help students (...)
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  50. Mary Warnock & Elisabeth Macdonald (2009). Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Dying? OUP Oxford.
    Easeful Death sets out straightforwardly the arguments for and against the legalization of assisted suicide and euthanasia. Exploring the philosophical and legal debates as well as the medical practicalities of this sensitive issue, the authors ultimately conclude that the law should embrace a more compassionate approach to assisted dying.
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