Search results for 'Death and Dying' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christina Marsden Gillis (2006). “Seeing the Difference”: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Death, Dying, Humanities, and Medicine. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 27 (2):105-115.score: 90.0
    This essay explores how strategies integral to inquiry in the humanities provide insights into developing an interdisciplinary approach to studies of death and dying that will be relevant to medical practice as well as to humanistic study. The author asks how we can produce new modes of knowledge in an area where “knowing” is highly problematized and argues that while a putative field of death and dying studies must include a range of disciplinary approaches it must (...)
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  2. Violet Handtke & Tenzin Wangmo (2014). Ageing Prisoners' Views on Death and Dying: Contemplating End-of-Life in Prison. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):373-386.score: 80.0
    Rising numbers of ageing prisoners and goals on implementing equivalent health care in prison raise issues surrounding end-of-life care for prisoners. The paucity of research on this topic in Europe means that the needs of older prisoners contemplating death in prison have not been established. To investigate elderly prisoners’ attitudes towards death and dying, 35 qualitative interviews with inmates aged 51 to 71 years were conducted in 12 Swiss prisons. About half of the prisoners reported having thought (...)
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  3. C. G. Prado (2008). Choosing to Die: Elective Death and Multiculturalism. Cambridge University Press.score: 72.0
    In this book, C. G. Prado addresses the difficult question of when and whether it is rational to end one’s life in order to escape devastating terminal illness. He specifically considers this question in light of the impact of multiculturalism on perceptions and judgments about what is right and wrong, permissible and impermissible. Prado introduces the idea of a “coincidental culture” to clarify the variety of values and commitments that influence decision. He also introduces the idea of a “proxy premise” (...)
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  4. C. A. Stevens & R. Hassan (1994). Management of Death, Dying and Euthanasia: Attitudes and Practices of Medical Practitioners in South Australia. Journal of Medical Ethics 20 (1):41-46.score: 72.0
    This article presents the first results of a study of the decisions made by health professionals in South Australia concerning the management of death, dying, and euthanasia, and focuses on the findings concerning the attitudes and practices of medical practitioners. Mail-back, self-administered questionnaires were posted in August 1991 to a ten per cent sample of 494 medical practitioners in South Australia randomly selected from the list published by the Medical Board of South Australia. A total response rate of (...)
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  5. Pablo Rodríguez Del Pozo & Joseph Fins (2005). Death, Dying and Informatics: Misrepresenting Religion on MedLine. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 6 (1):1-5.score: 70.0
    Background The globalization of medical science carries for doctors worldwide a correlative duty to deepen their understanding of patients' cultural contexts and religious backgrounds, in order to satisfy each as a unique individual. To become better informed, practitioners may turn to MedLine, but it is unclear whether the information found there is an accurate representation of culture and religion. To test MedLine's representation of this field, we chose the topic of death and dying in the three major monotheistic (...)
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  6. Franklin G. Miller & Robert Truog (2011). Death, Dying, and Organ Donation: Reconstructing Medical Ethics at the End of Life. Oxford University Press.score: 70.0
    This book challenges fundamental doctrines of established medical ethics. It is argued that the routine practice of stopping life support technology causes the death of patients and that donors of vital organs (hearts, liver, lungs, and both kidneys) are not really dead at the time that their organs are removed for life-saving transplantation. Although these practices are ethically legitimate, they are not compatible with traditional medical ethics: they conflict with the norms that doctors must not intentionally cause the (...) of their patients and that vital organs can be obtained only from dead donors. The aim of this book is to undertake an ethical examination that aims to honestly face the reality of medical practices at the end of life. This involves exposing the misconception that stopping life support merely allows patients to die from their medical conditions, that there is an ethical bright line separating withdrawal of life support from active euthanasia, and that determination of death of hospitalized patients prior to vital organ donation is consistent with the established biological conception of death. A novel ethical justification is required for procuring vital organs from still-living donors. It is contended that in the context of plans to withdraw life support, donors of vital organs are not harmed or wronged by organ procurement prior to death, provided that valid consent is obtained for stopping treatment and organ donation. In view of serious practical difficulties in facing the truth regarding organ donation, an alternative pragmatic account is developed for justifying current practices that relies on the concept of transparent legal fictions. In sum, it is the thesis of this book that to preserve the legitimacy of end-of-life practices, we need to reconstruct medical ethics. (shrink)
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  7. Felicia Ackerman (1999). Death, Dying, and Dignity. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:189-201.score: 70.0
    The word ‘dignity’ is a staple of contemporary American medical ethics, where it often follows the words ‘death with’. People unfamiliar with this usage might expect it to apply to one’s manner of dying—for example, a stately exit involving ceremonial farewells. Instead, conventional usage generally holds that “death with dignity” ends or prevents life without dignity, by which is meant life marked not by buffoonery, but by illness and disability. Popular examples of dignity-depleters include dementia, incontinence, and (...)
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  8. Iona Heath (2012). Living, Dying and the Nature of Death. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (5):1079-1081.score: 70.0
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  9. Milton D. Heifetz (1975). The Right to Die: A Neurosurgeon Speaks of Death with Candor. Putnam.score: 70.0
  10. Antonio Calcagno (2008). Being, Aevum , and Nothingness: Edith Stein on Death and Dying. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 41 (1):59-72.score: 68.0
    This article seeks to present for the first time a more systematic account of Edith Stein’s views on death and dying. First, I will argue that death does not necessarily lead us to an understanding of our earthly existence as aevum, that is, an experience of time between eternity and finite temporality. We always bear the mark of our finitude, including our finite temporality, even when we exist within the eternal mind of God. To claim otherwise, is (...)
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  11. Jon Robson (forthcoming). A-Time to Die: A Growing Block Account of the Evil of Death. Philosophia:1-15.score: 68.0
    In this paper I argue that the growing block theory of time has rather surprising, and hitherto unexplored, explanatory benefits when it comes to certain enduring philosophical puzzles concerning death. In particular, I claim the growing block theorist has readily available and convincing answers to the following questions: (i) Why is it an evil to be dead but not an evil to be not yet born? (ii) How can death be an evil for the dead if they no (...)
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  12. Claire Leimbach (2009). The Intimacy of Death and Dying: Simple Guidance to Help You Through. Inpsired Living/Allen & Unwin.score: 68.0
    Offers over forty stories about individuals who have dealt with the loss of a loved one, and advice on handling situations surrounding death and dying such as talking with children about grief, suicide, and funeral arrangements.
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  13. Alok Pandey (2006). Death, Dying, and Beyond. Sri Aurobindo Institute of Research in Social Sciences, Sri Aurobindo Society.score: 68.0
     
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  14. Erich H. Loewy (1999). Physician Assisted Dying and Death with Dignity: Missed Opportunities and Prior Neglected Conditions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (2):189-194.score: 64.0
    This paper argues that the world-wide debate about physician assisted dying is missing a golden opportunity to focus on the orchestration of the end of life. Such a process consists of far more than adequate pain control and is a skill which, like all other skills, needs to be learned and taught. The debate offers an opportunity to press for the teaching of this skill. Beyond this, the desire to assure that all can have access to palliative care makes (...)
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  15. Adam Buben (2011). Christian Hate: Death, Dying, and Reason in Pascal and Kierkegaard. In Patrick Stokes & Adam Buben (eds.), Kierkegaard and Death. Indiana University Press.score: 64.0
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  16. Christina Staudt (2009). From Concealment to Recognition : The Discourse on Death, Dying, and Grief. In Michael K. Bartalos (ed.), Speaking of Death: America's New Sense of Mortality. Praeger.score: 64.0
     
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  17. Mary Warnock (2008). Easeful Death: Is There a Case for Assisted Dying? Oxford University Press.score: 62.0
    Fundamental principles : the nature of the dispute -- Types of euthanasia -- Psychiatric assisted suicide -- Neonates -- Incompetent adults -- Human life is sacred -- The slippery slope -- Medical views -- Four methods of easing death and their effect on doctors -- Looking further ahead.
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  18. Paul Muench (2011). Thinking Death Into Every Moment: The Existence-Problem of Dying in Kierkegaard’s Postscript. In Patrick Stokes & Adam Buben (eds.), Kierkegaard and Death. Indiana University Press.score: 62.0
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  19. E. T. Bartlett (1995). Differences Between Death and Dying. Journal of Medical Ethics 21 (5):270-276.score: 62.0
    With so much attention being paid to the development and refinement of appropriate criteria and tests for death, little attention has been given to the broader conceptual issues having to do with its definition or with the relation of a definition to its criterion. The task of selecting the correct criterion is, however, virtually impossible without proper attention to the broader conceptual setting in which the definition operates as the key feature. All of the issues I will discuss arise (...)
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  20. Lars Sandman (2005). Should People Die a Natural Death? Health Care Analysis 13 (4):275-287.score: 62.0
    In the article the concept of natural death as used in end-of-life decision contexts is explored. Reviewing some recent empirical studies on end-of-life decision-making, it is argued that the concept of natural death should not be used as an action-guiding concept in end-of-life decisions both for being too imprecise and descriptively open in its current use but mainly since it appears to be superfluous to the kind of considerations that are really at stake in these situations. Considerations in (...)
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  21. Ben Bradley (2004). When is Death Bad for the One Who Dies? Noûs 38 (1):1–28.score: 60.0
    Epicurus seems to have thought that death is not bad for the one who dies, since its badness cannot be located in time. I show that Epicurus’ argument presupposes Presentism, and I argue that death is bad for its victim at all and only those times when the person would have been living a life worth living had she not died when she did. I argue that my account is superior to competing accounts given by Thomas Nagel, Fred (...)
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  22. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2010). Retraction: End-of-Life Discontinuation of Destination Therapy with Cardiac and Ventilatory Support Medical Devices: Physician-Assisted Death or Allowing the Patient to Die? BMC Medical Ethics 11 (1):20-.score: 60.0
    BackgroundBioethics and law distinguish between the practices of "physician-assisted death" and "allowing the patient to die."DiscussionAdvances in biotechnology have allowed medical devices to be used as destination therapy that are designed for the permanent support of cardiac function and/or respiration after irreversible loss of these spontaneous vital functions. For permanent support of cardiac function, single ventricle or biventricular mechanical assist devices and total artificial hearts are implanted in the body. Mechanical ventilators extrinsic to the body are used for permanent (...)
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  23. David Evans (2007). Seeking an Ethical and Legal Way of Procuring Transplantable Organs From the Dying Without Further Attempts to Redefine Human Death. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):11.score: 60.0
    Because complex organs taken from unequivocally dead people are not suitable for transplantation, human death has been redefined so that it can be certified at some earlier stage in the dying process and thereby make viable organs available without legal problems. Redefinitions based on concepts of.
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  24. S. Ost (2011). Physician-Assisted Dying Outlaws: Self-Appointed Death in the Netherlands. Clinical Ethics 6 (1):20-26.score: 60.0
    No law in any jurisdiction that permits physician assisted dying offers individuals a medically assisted death without the need to comply with certain criteria. The Netherlands is no exception. There is evidence to suggest that physicians are averse to providing an assisted death even when the Dutch ‘due care criteria’ have been met and the unbearable pain and suffering requirement is especially difficult to satisfy. Some individuals with an enduring desire to die who do not meet the (...)
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  25. P. J. Miller (1987). Death with Dignity and the Right to Die: Sometimes Doctors Have a Duty to Hasten Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (2):81-85.score: 60.0
    As the single most important experience in the lives of all people, the process and event of death must be handled carefully by the medical community. Twentieth-century advances in life-sustaining technology impose new areas of concern on those who are responsible for dying persons. Physicians and surrogates alike must be ready and willing to decide not to intervene in the dying process, indeed to hasten it, when they see the autonomy and dignity of patients threatened. In addition, (...)
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  26. M. Luchetti (2010). Eluana Englaro, Chronicle of a Death Foretold: Ethical Considerations on the Recent Right-to-Die Case in Italy. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (6):333-335.score: 60.0
    In 1992, Eluana Englaro was involved in a car accident in Italy that eventually left her in a permanent vegetative state requiring artificial nutrition and hydration. This paper, after briefly reviewing Eluana's case, gives a chronicle of Eluana last months until her death on 9 February 2009, and discusses the right-to-die controversy in Italy. For many years, Mr Englaro, Eluana's father, would litigate to enforce what he considered to be his daughter's wish to discontinue life-prolonging treatment. In July 2008, (...)
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  27. Erich H. Loewy (1988). Oh Death, Where is Thy Sting? Reflections on Dealing with Dying Patients. Journal of Medical Humanities and Bioethics 9 (2):135-142.score: 60.0
    This paper examines the reactions of physicians and other health-professionals when they become involved in decisions about the death of their patients. The way people understand the condition of death has a profound influence on attitudes towards death and dying issues. Four traditional views of death are explored. The problem that physicians have in helping patients die (be it by hastening death through pain control, assisting patients in suicide or by more active means) is (...)
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  28. P. R. Ferguson (1997). Causing Death or Allowing to Die? Developments in the Law. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (6):368-372.score: 60.0
    Several cases which have been considered by the courts in recent years have highlighted the legal dilemmas facing doctors whose decisions result in the ending of a patient's life. This paper considers the case of Dr Cox, who was convicted of attempting to murder one of his patients, and explores the roles of motive, diminished responsibility and consent in cases of "mercy killing". The Cox decision is compared to that of Tony Bland and Janet Johnstone, in which the patients were (...)
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  29. B. Wannenwetsch (2011). From Ars Moriendi to Assisted Suicide: Bonhoefferian Explorations Into Cultures of Death and Dying. Studies in Christian Ethics 24 (4):428-440.score: 60.0
    The essay is intended to shed light on the back-stage of contemporary debates about death and the dying, and more specifically on newer trends that emphasise the importance of ‘dying well’ and the moral viability of a ‘good death’. It raises the question as to whether there is a hidden conceptual link between the high medieval tradition of ars moriendi and the modern trend towards embracing (assisted) suicide as a final expression of human autonomy and suggests (...)
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  30. A. Bowling (1983). The Hospitalisation of Death: Should More People Die at Home? Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (3):158-161.score: 60.0
    With the increase in the proportion of hospital deaths there is increasing debate about appropriateness of place of death. Death should be a family affair but is increasingly hidden from public view. In contrast to those who die at home, most of those who die in hospital die alone with no relatives or friends with them. Husbands and wives are less likely to have the opportunity to say 'goodbye' to their dying spouses. As people become less familiar (...)
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  31. J. McCarthy, J. Weafer & M. Loughrey (2010). Irish Views on Death and Dying: A National Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (8):454-458.score: 60.0
    Objective To determine the public's understanding of and views about a range of ethical issues in relation to death and dying. Design Random, digit-dialling, telephone interview Setting Ireland. Participants 667 adult individuals. Results The general public are unfamiliar with terms associated with end-of-life care. Although most want to be informed if they have a terminal illness, they also value family support in this regard. Most of the respondents believe that competent patients have the right to refuse life-saving treatment. (...)
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  32. Fu-Jin Shih, Meei-Ling Gau, Yaw-Sheng Lin, Suang-Jing Pong & Hung-Ru Lin (2006). Death and Help Expected From Nurses When Dying. Nursing Ethics 13 (4):360-375.score: 60.0
    This project was undertaken to ascertain the perceptions of a group of Taiwan’s fourth-year bachelor of science in nursing (BSN) students regarding death and help expected from nurses during the dying process. Within the Chinese culture, death is one of the most important life issues. However, in many Chinese societies it is difficult for people to reveal their deepest feelings to their significant others or loved ones. It was in this context that this project was developed because (...)
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  33. Ciprian Cherhat (2010). Istvan Kiraly V., Moartea si experienta muririi/ Death and the Experience of Dying. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 2 (4):172-175.score: 58.0
    Istvan Kiraly V., Moartea si experienta muririi. In(tro)spectie metafizica si filosofico-aplicata Editura Casa Cartii de Stiinta, Cluj-Napoca 2002, 154 p.
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  34. David Dempsey (1977). The Way We Die: An Investigation of Death and Dying in America Today. Mcgraw-Hill.score: 58.0
     
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  35. W. J. Gavin (1995). Cuttin' the Body Loose: Historical, Biological, and Personal Approaches to Death and Dying. Temple University Press.score: 58.0
  36. Johann Christoph Hampe (1979). To Die is Gain: The Experience of One's Own Death. John Knox Press.score: 58.0
     
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  37. Philip Kapleau (1971/1974). The Wheel of Death: A Collection of Writings From Zen Buddhist and Other Sources on Death--Rebirth--Dying. Harper & Row.score: 58.0
  38. Robert F. Weir (ed.) (1986). Ethical Issues in Death and Dying. Columbia University Press.score: 58.0
     
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  39. Ho Mun Chan (2004). Sharing Death and Dying: Advance Directives, Autonomy and the Family. Bioethics 18 (2):87–103.score: 50.0
  40. Felicia Ackerman (2000). "For Now Have I My Death": The "Duty to Die" Versus the Duty to Help the Ill Stay Alive. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 24 (1):172–185.score: 50.0
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  41. Jessica Brown (2005). Adapt or Die: The Death of Invariantism? Philosophical Quarterly 55 (219):263–285.score: 50.0
    Contextualists support their view by appeal to cases which show that whether an attribution of knowledge seems correct depends on attributor factors. Contextualists conclude that the truth-conditions of knowledge attributions depend on the attributor's context. Invariantists respond that these cases show only that the warranted assertability-conditions of knowledge attributions depend on the attributor's context. I examine DeRose's recent argument against the possibility of such an invariantist response, an argument which appeals to the knowledge account of assertion and the context-sensitivity of (...)
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  42. Gavin Fairbairn (2002). A Good Death: On the Value of Death and Dying. Nursing Philosophy 3 (3):274–275.score: 50.0
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  43. Rihito Kimura (1996). Death and Dying in Japan. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 6 (4):374-378.score: 50.0
  44. Charles A. Corr (1979). Philosophers and the Course on Death and Dying. Metaphilosophy 10 (1):94–105.score: 50.0
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  45. Tomasz Kraj (2004). Sandman, Lars, a Good Death, on the Value of Death and Dying. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):79-82.score: 50.0
  46. N. Hatzinikolaou (2003). Prolonging Life or Hindering Death? An Orthodox Perspective on Death, Dying and Euthanasia. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):187-201.score: 50.0
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  47. Daniel B. Sinclair (2009). Dealing with Death in the Jewish Legal Tradition. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):297-305.score: 50.0
    The main theme of the article is the tension between the obligation to preserve life, and the value of timely death. This tension is resolved by distinguishing between precipitating death, which is prohibited, and merely removing an impediment to it, which is permitted. In contemporary Jewish law, a distinction is made between therapy, which may be discontinued, and life-support, which must be maintained until the establishment of death. Another theme is that of “soft” patient autonomy, and its (...)
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  48. I. H. Kerridge (2002). Death, Dying and Donation: Organ Transplantation and the Diagnosis of Death. Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):89.score: 50.0
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  49. Michael S. Jastremski (1984). Death and Dying: Reflections of an Intensivist. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 5 (2).score: 50.0
    The prolonged life support of individuals with no hope for recovery has been an unfortunate consequence of recent advances in medical technology. The use of intensive therapy in such patients is contrary to the physician's obligation to relieve suffering and also creates an enormous economic burden for society. Once the physician has determined that there is no hope for a meaningful recovery, it becomes ethically correct for him to withhold or withdraw intensive therapy from that patient provided that such an (...)
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  50. Mark G. Kuczewski (2004). Re-Reading On Death & Dying: What Elisabeth Kubler-Ross Can Teach Clinical Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 4 (4):W18-W23.score: 50.0
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