Search results for 'Death in music' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kathi Meyer-Baer (1970/1984). Music of the Spheres and the Dance of Death: Studies in Musical Iconology. Da Capo Press.score: 595.0
  2. Erin Brooks (2003). The Dies Irae (" Day of Wrath") and the Totentanz (" Dance of Death"): Medieval Themes Revisited in 19™ Century Music and Culture. Inquiry 4.score: 405.0
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  3. David W. Mccormick (forthcoming). Book Review: My Only Comfort: Death, Deliverance, and Discipleship in the Music of Bach. [REVIEW] Interpretation 55 (3):336-338.score: 405.0
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  4. Bruce W. Holsinger (2001). Music, Body, and Desire in Medieval Culture: Hildegard of Bingen to Chaucer. Stanford University Press.score: 345.0
    Ranging chronologically from the twelfth to the fifteenth century and thematically from Latin to vernacular literary modes, this book challenges standard assumptions about the musical cultures and philosophies of the European Middle Ages. Engaging a wide range of premodern texts and contexts, from the musicality of sodomy in twelfth-century polyphony to Chaucer's representation of pedagogical violence in the Prioress's Tale, from early Christian writings on the music of the body to the plainchant and poetry of Hildegard of Bingen, the (...)
     
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  5. Roger Scruton (2004). Death-Devoted Heart: Sex and the Sacred in Wagner's Tristan and Isolde. OUP USA.score: 261.0
    A tale of forbidden love and inevitable death, the medieval legend of Tristan and Isolde recounts the story of two lovers unknowingly drinking a magic potion and ultimately dying in one another's arms. Critics have lauded Wagner's Tristan und Isolde for the originality and subtlety of the music, but have often viewed the drama as a "mere trifle," about Wagner's own forbidden affair with Matilde Wesendonk, the wife of a banker who supported him during his exile in Switzerland. (...)
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  6. Benjamin Britten (1996). Musical Signs in Death in Venice By. In Eero Tarasti, Paul Forsell & Richard Littlefield (eds.), Musical Semiotics in Growth. International Semiotics Institute. 4--473.score: 254.3
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  7. Gregory A. Bryant (2013). Animal Signals and Emotion in Music: Coordinating Affect Across Groups. Frontiers in Psychology 4:990.score: 230.0
    Researchers studying the emotional impact of music have not traditionally been concerned with the principled relationship between form and function in evolved animal signals. The acoustic structure of musical forms is related in important ways to emotion perception, and thus research on nonhuman animal vocalizations is relevant for understanding emotion in music. Musical behavior occurs in cultural contexts that include many other coordinated activities which mark group identity, and can allow people to communicate within and between social alliances. (...)
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  8. Leonard B. Meyer (1956). Emotion and Meaning in Music. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.score: 224.0
    Analyzes the meaning expressed in music, the social and psychological sources of meaning, and the methods of musical communication This is a book meant for ...
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  9. Géraldine Ruiz, Tenzin Wangmo, Patrick Mutzenberg, Jessica Sinclair & Bernice Simone Elger (2014). Understanding Death in Custody: A Case for a Comprehensive Definition. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (3):387-398.score: 224.0
    Prisoners sometimes die in prison, either due to natural illness, violence, suicide, or a result of imprisonment. The purpose of this study is to understand deaths in custody using qualitative methodology and to argue for a comprehensive definition of death in custody that acknowledges deaths related to the prison environment. Interviews were conducted with 33 experts, who primarily work as lawyers or forensic doctors with national and/or international organisations. Responses were coded and analysed qualitatively. Defining deaths in custody according (...)
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  10. Kristin Savell (2011). Confronting Death in Legal Disputes About Treatment-Limitation in Children. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (4):363-377.score: 216.0
    Most legal analyses of selective nontreatment of seriously ill children centre on the question of whether it is in a child’s best interests to be kept alive in the face of extreme suffering and/or an intolerable quality of life. Courts have resisted any direct confrontation with the question of whether the child’s death is in his or her best interests. Nevertheless, representations of death may have an important role to play in this field of jurisprudence. The prevailing philosophy (...)
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  11. Daniel B. Sinclair (2009). Dealing with Death in the Jewish Legal Tradition. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (3):297-305.score: 212.0
    The main theme of the article is the tension between the obligation to preserve life, and the value of timely death. This tension is resolved by distinguishing between precipitating death, which is prohibited, and merely removing an impediment to it, which is permitted. In contemporary Jewish law, a distinction is made between therapy, which may be discontinued, and life-support, which must be maintained until the establishment of death. Another theme is that of “soft” patient autonomy, and its (...)
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  12. George C. Schuetze (2005). Convergences in Music and Art: A Bibliographic Study. Harmonie Park Press.score: 194.0
    Artists inspired by music and musicians -- Composers inspired by art and artists -- Twin talents : artist-musicians and musician-artists -- Musicians pose for the artists : a history of portrait iconography.
     
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  13. Andrew J. Dell’Olio (2010). Do Near-Death Experiences Provide a Rational Basis for Belief in Life After Death? Sophia 49 (1):113 - 128.score: 192.0
    In this paper I suggest that near-death experiences (NDEs) provide a rational basis for belief in life after death. My argument is a simple one and is modeled on the argument from religious experience for the existence of God. But unlike the proponents of the argument from religious experience, I stop short of claiming that NDEs prove the existence of life after death. Like the argument from religious experience, however, my argument turns on whether or not there (...)
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  14. Michiel Kamp (2014). Musical Ecologies in Video Games. Philosophy and Technology 27 (2):235-249.score: 189.0
    What makes video games unique as an audiovisual medium is not just that they are interactive, but that this interactivity is rule bound and goal oriented. This means that player experience, including experience of the music, is somehow shaped or structured by these characteristics. Because of its emphasis on action in perception, James Gibson’s ecological approach to psychology—particularly his concept of affordances—is well suited to theorise the role of music in player experience. In a game, players perceive the (...)
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  15. Patrick C. M. Wong Marc Ettlinger, Elizabeth H. Margulis (2011). Implicit Memory in Music and Language. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 186.0
    Research on music and language in recent decades has focused on their overlapping neurophysiological, perceptual, and cognitive underpinnings, ranging from the mechanism for encoding basic auditory cues to the mechanism for detecting violations in phrase structure. These overlaps have most often been identified in musicians with musical knowledge that was acquired explicitly, through formal training. In this paper, we review independent bodies of work in music and language that suggest an important role for implicitly acquired knowledge, implicit memory, (...)
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  16. Mari Tervaniemi Elvira Brattico, Vinoo Alluri, Brigitte Bogert, Thomas Jacobsen, Nuutti Vartiainen, Sirke Nieminen (2011). A Functional MRI Study of Happy and Sad Emotions in Music with and Without Lyrics. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 186.0
    Musical emotions, such as happiness and sadness, have been investigated using instrumental music devoid of linguistic content. However, pop and rock, the most common musical genres, utilize lyrics for conveying emotions. Using participants’ self-selected musical excerpts, we studied their behavior and brain responses to elucidate how lyrics interact with musical emotion processing, as reflected by emotion recognition and activation of limbic areas involved in affective experience. We extracted samples from subjects’ selections of sad and happy pieces and sorted them (...)
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  17. Robin M. James (2007). Deconstruction, Fetishism, and the Racial Contract: On the Politics of "Faking It" in Music. CR 7 (1):45-80.score: 180.0
    I read Sara Kofman's work on Nietzsche, Charles Mills' _The Racial Contract_, and Kodwo Eshun's Afrofuturist musicology to argue that most condemnations of "faking it" in music rest on a racially and sexually problematic fetishization of "the real.".
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  18. Kevin Connolly, John Donaldson, David M. Gray, Emily McWilliams, Sofia Ortiz-Hinojosa & David Suarez, Recognizing Emotion in Music (Network for Sensory Research Toronto Workshop on Perceptual Learning: Question Six).score: 180.0
    This is an excerpt from a report that highlights and explores five questions which arose from the workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of Toronto, Mississauga on May 10th and 11th, 2012. This excerpt explores the question: How do we recognize distinct types of emotion in music?
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  19. Helen Watt (2000). Life and Death in Health Care Ethics: A Short Introduction. Routledge.score: 180.0
    In a world of rapid technological advances, the moral issues raised by life and death choices in healthcare remain obscure. Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics provides a concise, thoughtful and extremely accessible guide to these moral issues. Helen Watt examines, using real-life cases, the range of choices taken by healthcare professionals, patients and clients which lead to the shortening of life. The topics looked at include: euthanasia and withdrawal of treatment; the persistent vegetative state; abortion; IVF and (...)
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  20. Andrew Geeves, Doris J. F. McIlwain, John Sutton & Wayne Christensen (2013). To Think or Not To Think: The Apparent Paradox of Expert Skill in Music Performance. Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-18.score: 180.0
    Expert skill in music performance involves an apparent paradox. On stage, expert musicians are required accurately to retrieve information that has been encoded over hours of practice. Yet they must also remain open to the demands of the ever-changing situational contingencies with which they are faced during performance. To further explore this apparent paradox and the way in which it is negotiated by expert musicians, this article profiles theories presented by Roger Chaffin, Hubert Dreyfus and Tony and Helga Noice. (...)
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  21. Mohamed Y. Rady & Joseph L. Verheijde (2013). Brain-Dead Patients Are Not Cadavers: The Need to Revise the Definition of Death in Muslim Communities. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (1):25-45.score: 180.0
    The utilitarian construct of two alternative criteria of human death increases the supply of transplantable organs at the end of life. Neither the neurological criterion (heart-beating donation) nor the circulatory criterion (non-heart-beating donation) is grounded in scientific evidence but based on philosophical reasoning. A utilitarian death definition can have unintended consequences for dying Muslim patients: (1) the expedited process of determining death for retrieval of transplantable organs can lead to diagnostic errors, (2) the equivalence of brain (...) with human death may be incorrect, and (3) end-of-life religious values and traditional rituals may be sacrificed. Therefore, it is imperative to reevaluate the two different types and criteria of death introduced by the Resolution (Fatwa) of the Council of Islamic Jurisprudence on Resuscitation Apparatus in 1986. Although we recognize that this Fatwa was based on best scientific evidence available at that time, more recent evidence shows that it rests on outdated knowledge and understanding of the phenomenon of human death. We recommend redefining death in Islam to reaffirm the singularity of this biological phenomenon as revealed in the Quran 14 centuries ago. (shrink)
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  22. Carl E. Seashore (1981). In Search of Beauty in Music: A Scientific Approach to Musical Esthetics. Greenwood Press.score: 180.0
    In Search of Beauty in Music A SCIENTIFIC APPROACH TO MUSICAL ESTHETICS by CARL E. SEASHORE PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY AND DEAN EMERITUS OF THE GRADUATE SCHOOL, ...
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  23. Elizabeth Gould (2011). Writing Trojan Horses and War Machines: The Creative Political in Music Education Research. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (8):874-887.score: 180.0
    North American music education is a commodity sold to pre-service and in-service music teachers. Like all mass-produced consumables, it is valuable to the extent that it is not creative, that is, to the extent that it is reproducible. This is demonstrated in curricular materials, notably general music series textbook and music scores available from a rapidly shrinking cadre of publishers, as well as rigid and pre-determined pedagogical practices. Distributing resources and techniques that produce predicable, consistent, and (...)
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  24. Benjamin Krämer (2012). Types of Statements on Emotion in Music. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (43).score: 180.0
    The question of emotion in music is addressed from a linguistic perspective, providing a typology of statements that can be made about that topic. In particular, it is analyzed how an interlocutor could react to such statements uttered by another person, and whether or how the content of the statements could be refuted by the listener, and possibly corroborated by the speaker. Furthermore, it is briefly discussed which theories of emotion in music are compatible with the respective types (...)
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  25. Kenneth Gloag (2012). Postmodernism in Music. Cambridge University Press.score: 180.0
    Postmodernism is a term that has been used extensively to describe general trends and specific works in many different cultural contexts, including literature, cinema, architecture and the visual arts. This introduction clarifies the term and explores its relevance for music through discussion of specific musical examples from the 1950s to the present day, providing an engagement between theory and practice. Overall, this book equips students with a thorough understanding of this complex but important topic in music studies. It: (...)
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  26. Elizabeth Gould (2011). Feminist Imperative(s) in Music and Education: Philosophy, Theory, or What Matters Most. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):130-147.score: 176.0
    A historically feminized profession, education in North America remains remarkably unaffected by feminism, with the notable exception of pedagogy and its impact on curriculum. The purpose of this paper is to describe characteristics of feminism that render it particularly useful and appropriate for developing potentialities in education and music education. As a set of flexible methodological tools informed by Gilles Deleuze's notions of philosophy and art, I argue feminism may contribute to education's becoming more efficacious, reflexive, and reflective of (...)
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  27. Anthony Pople (ed.) (1994/2006). Theory, Analysis and Meaning in Music. Cambridge University Press.score: 176.0
    Recent encounters with structuralist and poststructuralist critical theory, linguistics, and cognitive sciences have brought the theory and analysis of music into the orbit of important developments in present-day intellectual history. Without seeking to impose an explicit redefinition of either theory or analysis, this book explores the limits of both. Essays on decidability, ambiguity, metaphor, music as text, and music analysis as cognitive theory are complemented by studies of works by Debussy, Schoenberg, Birtwistle and Boulez.
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  28. Aasim I. Padela, Ahsan Arozullah & Ebrahim Moosa (2013). Brain Death in Islamic Ethico-Legal Deliberation: Challenges for Applied Islamic Bioethics. Bioethics 27 (3):132-139.score: 176.0
    Since the 1980s, Islamic scholars and medical experts have used the tools of Islamic law to formulate ethico-legal opinions on brain death. These assessments have varied in their determinations and remain controversial. Some juridical councils such as the Organization of Islamic Conferences' Islamic Fiqh Academy (OIC-IFA) equate brain death with cardiopulmonary death, while others such as the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences (IOMS) analogize brain death to an intermediate state between life and death. Still other (...)
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  29. D. Rodríguez-Arias, J. C. Tortosa, C. J. Burant, P. Aubert, M. P. Aulisio & S. J. Youngner (2013). One or Two Types of Death? Attitudes of Health Professionals Towards Brain Death and Donation After Circulatory Death in Three Countries. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):457-467.score: 176.0
    This study examined health professionals’ (HPs) experience, beliefs and attitudes towards brain death (BD) and two types of donation after circulatory death (DCD)—controlled and uncontrolled DCD. Five hundred and eighty-seven HPs likely to be involved in the process of organ procurement were interviewed in 14 hospitals with transplant programs in France, Spain and the US. Three potential donation scenarios—BD, uncontrolled DCD and controlled DCD—were presented to study subjects during individual face-to-face interviews. Our study has two main findings: (1) (...)
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  30. Kate Crosby, Andrew Skilton & Amal Gunasena (2012). The Sutta on Understanding Death in the Transmission of Borān Meditation From Siam to the Kandyan Court. Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (2):177-198.score: 176.0
    This article announces the discovery of a Sinhalese version of the traditional meditation ( borān yogāvacara kammaṭṭhāna ) text in which the Consciousness or Mind, personified as a Princess living in a five-branched tree (the body), must understand the nature of death and seek the four gems that are the four noble truths. To do this she must overcome the cravings of the five senses, represented as five birds in the tree. Only in this way will she permanently avoid (...)
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  31. Daniel Barenboim (2004). Parallels and Paradoxes: Explorations in Music and Society. Vintage Books.score: 176.0
    These free-wheeling, often exhilarating dialogues—which grew out of the acclaimed Carnegie Hall Talks—are an exchange between two of the most prominent figures in contemporary culture: Daniel Barenboim, internationally renowned conductor and pianist, and Edward W. Said, eminent literary critic and impassioned commentator on the Middle East. Barenboim is an Argentinian-Israeli and Said a Palestinian-American; they are also close friends. As they range across music, literature, and society, they open up many fields of inquiry: the importance of a sense of (...)
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  32. Sebastian Ramon Philipp Gertz (2011). Death and Immortality in Late Neoplatonism: Studies on the Ancient Commentaries on Plato's Phaedo. Brill.score: 176.0
    This study focuses on the ancient commentaries on Plato’s Phaedo by Olympiodorus and Damascius and aims to present the relevance of their challenging and valuable readings of the dialogue to Neoplatonic ethics.
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  33. Robin James (2013). From "No Future" to "Delete Yourself (You Have No Chance To Win)&Quot;. Journal of Popular Music Studies 25 (4).score: 174.0
    Beginning with the role of the Sex Pistols’s (1977) “God Save the Queen” in Lee Edelman (2004) and J. Jack Halberstam’s (2010) debates about queer death and failure, I follow a musical motive (the main guitar riff) from the Pistols track to its reappearance in Atari Teenage Riot’s (ATR’s) 1995 “Delete Yourself (You Have No Chance To Win).” In this song, as in much of ATR’s work from the 1990s, overlapping (and often appropriated) queer and Afro-diasporic aesthetics condense around (...)
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  34. Derek Matravers (2007). Expression in Music. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.score: 170.0
    This is a critical review of the current state of the debate in the philosophy of music, and defends the author's view as the phenomenology of the experience.
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  35. Joseph L. Verheijde, Mohamed Y. Rady & Joan McGregor (2009). Presumed Consent for Organ Preservation in Uncontrolled Donation After Cardiac Death in the United States: A Public Policy with Serious Consequences. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 4 (1):1-8.score: 170.0
    Organ donation after cessation of circulation and respiration, both controlled and uncontrolled, has been proposed by the Institute of Medicine as a way to increase opportunities for organ procurement. Despite claims to the contrary, both forms of controlled and uncontrolled donation after cardiac death raise significant ethical and legal issues. Identified causes for concern include absence of agreement on criteria for the declaration of death, nonexistence of universal guidelines for duration before stopping resuscitation efforts and techniques, and assumption (...)
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  36. Manjula Saxena (2005). Krausz on Interpretation in Music. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (1):71-73.score: 170.0
    This paper suggests certain differences between the interpretation of Indian classical music and the interpretation of Western classical music. In Indian music the work is constituted in the moment of a recital. The performer is the maker of the music. Accordingly, the performer simultaneously produces a work and interprets it. Further, in the Indian tradition. music is a path of “bhakti yoga,” or a path of devotion.
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  37. Havi Carel (2007). Temporal Finitude and Finitude of Possibility: The Double Meaning of Death in Being and Time. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (4):541 – 556.score: 168.0
    The confusion surrounding Heidegger's account of death in Being and Time has led to severe criticisms, some of which dismiss his analysis as incoherent and obtuse. I argue that Heidegger's critics err by equating Heidegger's concept of death with our ordinary concept. As I show, Heidegger's concept of death is not the same as the ordinary meaning of the term, namely, the event that ends life. But nor does this concept merely denote the finitude of Dasein's possibilities (...)
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  38. Krzysztof Guczalski (2005). Expressive Meaning in Music: Generality Versus Particularity. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):342-367.score: 168.0
    The dilemma referred to in the title occurs in many contexts concerned with expressive meaning in art, and especially music, which suggests that the issue it raises will be central to any complete theory of musical expressiveness. One notable attempt to resolve the paradox of simultaneous generality and particularity in music is in Aaron Ridley's book Music, Value and the Passions. I show why I consider his account unsatisfactory and then propose my own resolution of the paradox. (...)
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  39. Trip Glazer (2011). Robert B. Pippin: Hegel on Self-Consciousness: Desire and Death in the Phenomenology of Spirit. [REVIEW] Human Studies 34 (4):481-487.score: 168.0
    Robert B. Pippin: Hegel on Self-Consciousness: Desire and Death in the Phenomenology of Spirit Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 481-487 DOI 10.1007/s10746-011-9199-4 Authors Trip Glazer, Department of Philosophy, Georgetown University, Washington, DC, USA Journal Human Studies Online ISSN 1572-851X Print ISSN 0163-8548 Journal Volume Volume 34 Journal Issue Volume 34, Number 4.
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  40. Isabelle Wallace (2002). From Painting's Death To The Death In Painting: Or, What Jasper Johns Found In Marcel Duchamp's Tu M' /Tomb. Angelaki 7 (1):133-156.score: 168.0
    (2002). From Painting's Death To The Death In Painting: Or, What Jasper Johns Found In Marcel Duchamp's Tu m' /Tomb. Angelaki: Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 133-156.
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  41. Jacqueline A. Laing (2003). Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics: A Short Introduction: H Watt. Routledge, 2000, Pound7.99, Vii + 97pp. ISBN 0-415-21574-. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 29 (2):122-122.score: 168.0
    There is currently a dearth of bioethical literature presenting what might be called a more traditional approach to medicine and health care. Life and Death in Healthcare Ethics promises a reasoned and clear alternative. It considers ethical concerns raised by reproduction and death and dying. The issues considered include euthanasia and withdrawal of treatment, the persistent vegetative state, abortion, cloning and in vitro fertilization. Given its clarity and simplicity the book is likely to be read eagerly by students (...)
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  42. D. Shaw (2001). 'Women in Music': A Reply to Gordon Graham. British Journal of Aesthetics 41 (1):84-87.score: 168.0
    In his article 'Women in Music' Gordon Graham argues that 'women do not make composers' and 'there is good reason to believe that the composition of music will continue to be an activity largely of men'. In reply Shaw argues there is a deep inconsistency in Graham's argument or a gap which, given Graham's views, he would be hard pressed to fill. Shaw also raises objections to Graham's claim that his view that women cannot compose significant music, (...)
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  43. Wayne D. Bowman & Ana Lucía Frega (eds.) (2012). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Music Education. Oup Usa.score: 168.0
    In The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Music Education, editors Wayne D. Bowman and Ana Lucia Frega have drawn together a variety of philosophical perspectives from the profession's most exciting scholars from all over the world. Rather than relegating philosophical inquiry to moot questions and abstract situations, the contributors to this volume address everyday concerns faced by music educators everywhere. Emphasizing clarity, fairness, rigour, and utility above all, The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Music Education will challenge (...)
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  44. G. William Moore, Robert E. Miller & Grover M. Hutchins (1988). Determining Cause of Death in 45,564 Autopsy Reports. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 9 (2).score: 168.0
    It has been demonstrated that death certificates do not accurately record the actual cause of death in up to one-fourth of cases, as determined from subsequent autopsy findings. The purpose of this study was to explore the use of natural language autopsy data bases as an automated quality assurance mechanism. We translated the account of the major process leading to death, or the primary diagnosis, from all 45,564 narrative autopsy reports obtained at The Johns Hopkins Hospital between (...)
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  45. Donald Walhout (1989). Augustine on the Transcendent in Music. Philosophy and Theology 3 (3):283-292.score: 168.0
    I offer an argument for the claim that there is a transcendent dimension in music. The argument begins with one offered by Augustine in the De Musica, and adds additional support from contemporary discussions in musicology.
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  46. H. Zafrani (2005). Visions of Suffering and Death in Jewish Societies of the Muslim West. Diogenes 52 (1):83-104.score: 168.0
    The author encountered evocations of suffering and death in all the studies and research he devoted, over 40 or so years, to the intellectual, social and religious life of western Muslim Judaism, and indeed the whole of traditional Jewish thought and its varied modes of expression: rabbinical law, Hebrew poetry, the literature of homily and preaching, mystical writings and the kabbala, dialect and popular literatures in Judeo-Arabic and Judeo-Berber. Some passages are taken from the Zohar (‘The town the angel (...)
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  47. J. R. McConnell (1999). The Ambiguity About Death in Japan: An Ethical Implication for Organ Procurement. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):322-324.score: 168.0
    In the latter half of the twentieth century, developed countries of the world have made tremendous strides in organ donation and transplantation. However, in this area of medicine, Japan has been slow to follow. Japanese ethics, deeply rooted in religion and tradition, have affected their outlook on life and death. Because the Japanese have only recently started to acknowledge the concept of brain death, transplantation of major organs has been hindered in that country. Currently, there is a dual (...)
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  48. Gregory Morgan Swer (2003). The Road to Necropolis: Technics and Death in the Philosophy of Lewis Mumford. History of the Human Sciences 16 (4):39-59.score: 168.0
    The purpose of this article is to explore the close link between technology and death in the philosophical writings of Lewis Mumford. Mumford famously argued that throughout the history of western civilization we find intertwined two competing forms of technics; the democratic biotechnic form and the authoritarian monotechnic form. The former technics were said to be strongly compatible with an organic form of life while the latter were said to be allied to a mechanical power complex. What is perhaps (...)
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  49. Estelle R. Jorgensen (2012). On Informalities in Music Education. In Wayne D. Bowman & Ana Lucía Frega (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy in Music Education. Oup Usa. 453.score: 168.0
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  50. Julius Portnoy (1973). Music in the Life of Man. Westport, Conn.,Greenwood Press.score: 168.0
     
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