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  1. Bettina Bergo, Zachary Braiterman, Martin Buber, Willa Cather, Joseph Conrad, Deborah Cook, Gilles Deleuze, Jacques Derrida, Patrick K. Dooley & Paul Franks (forthcoming). Berendzen, jc. Philosophy Today.
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  2. Deborah Cook (forthcoming). Notes on Individuation in Adorno and Foucault in Advance. Philosophy Today.
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  3. Deborah Cook (2013). Adorno, Foucault and Critique. Philosophy and Social Criticism 39 (10):0191453713507016.
    Adorno and Foucault are among the 20th century’s most renowned social critics but little work has been done to compare their ideas about the activity of critique. ‘Adorno, Foucault and Critique’ attempts to fill this lacuna. It takes as its starting point the Kantian legacy that informs Adorno’s and Foucault’s notions of critique, or their ‘ontologies of the present’, as Foucault calls them. Exploring the ontological foundations of critique, the article then addresses the principal objects of critique: domination and fascism. (...)
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  4. Deborah Cook (2013). Communication in Constellation. Philosophy Today 46 (1):41-59.
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  5. Deborah Cook (2013). Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):266 - 268.
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  6. Deborah Cook (2012). Review: Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory Leiden: Brill, 2011. X+ 259 Pp. ISBN 9789004188006, Hardback€ 103.00/US $146.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):266-268.
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  7. Deborah Cook (2012). Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory. Journal of Critical Realism 11 (2):266 - 268.
    Völker Heins, Between Friend and Foe: The Politics of Critical Theory Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 266-268 Authors Deborah Cook, University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, Ontario, N9B 3P4, Canada Journal Journal of Critical Realism Online ISSN 1572-5138 Print ISSN 1476-7430 Journal Volume Volume 11 Journal Issue Volume 11, Number 2 / 2012.
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  8. Nancy Armstrong, Deborah Cook, James Cruise, Lisa Eck, Megan Heffernan, David Jenemann, Nigel Joseph, Tom McCall, Lucy McNeece, JoAnne Myers, Julie Orlemanski, Jonathon Penny, Dale Shin, Vivasvan Soni, Frederick Turner & Philip Weinstein (2011). Individualism: The Cultural Logic of Modernity. Lexington Books.
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  9. Deborah Cook (2008). Adorno's Endgame. Philosophy Today 52 (2):173-187.
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  10. Deborah Cook (ed.) (2008). Theodor Adorno. Key Concepts. Acumen.
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  11. Deborah Cook (2007). Nature, Red in Tooth and Claw. Continental Philosophy Review 40 (1):49-72.
    “Nature, Red in Tooth and Claw” explores Adorno’s ideas about our mediated relationship with nature. The first section of the paper examines the epistemological significance of his thesis about the preponderance of the object while describing the Kantian features in his notion of mediation. Adorno’s conception of nature will also be examined in the context of a review of J. M. Bernstein’s and Fredric Jameson’s attempts to characterize it. The second section of the paper deals with Adorno’s Freudian account of (...)
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  12. Deborah Cook (2006). Adorno’s Critical Materialism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (6):719-737.
    The article explores the character of Adorno’s materialism while fleshing out his Marxist-inspired idea of natural history. Adorno offers a non-reductionist and non-dualistic account of the relationship between matter and mind, human history and natural history. Emerging from nature and remaining tied to it, the human mind is nonetheless qualitatively distinct from nature owing to its limited independence from it. Yet, just as human history is always also natural history, because human beings can never completely dissociate themselves from the natural (...)
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  13. Deborah Cook (2006). Nature Becoming Conscious of Itself. Philosophy Today 50 (3):296-306.
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  14. Deborah Cook (2006). Review of Critical Theory After Habermas: Encounters and Departures. Edited by Dieter Freundlieb. Wayne Hudson and John Rundell. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 5 (1):183-187.
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  15. Deborah Cook (2005). From the Actual to the Possible: Nonidentity Thinking. Constellations 12 (1):21-35.
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  16. Deborah Cook (2005). The Sundered Totality of System and Lifeworld. Historical Materialism 13 (4):55-78.
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  17. Deborah Cook (2004). Adorno, Habermas, and the Search for a Rational Society. Routledge.
    Theodor W. Adorno and Jürgen Habermas both champion the goal of a rational society. However, they differ significantly about what this society should look like and how best to achieve it. Exploring the premises shared by both critical theorists, along with their profound disagreements about social conditions today, this book defends Adorno against Habermas' influential criticisms of his account of Western society and prospects for achieving reasonable conditions of human life. The book begins with an overview of these critical theories (...)
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  18. Deborah Cook (2004). Ein Reaktionares Schwein ? Political Activism and Prospects for Change in Adorno. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 1:47-67.
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  19. Deborah Cook (2003). Review of Yvonne Sherratt, Adorno's Positive Dialectic. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (4).
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  20. Deborah Cook (2003). A Response to Finlayson. Historical Materialism 11 (2):189-198.
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  21. Deborah Cook (2001). Adorno, Ideology and Ideology Critique. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (1):1-20.
    Throughout his work, Adorno contrasted liberal ideology to the newer and more pernicious form of ideology found in positivism. The paper explores the philosophical basis for Adorno's contrast between liberal and positivist ideology. In Negative Dialectics, Adorno describes all ideology as identity-thinking. However, on his view, liberal ideology represents a more rational form of identity-thinking. Fearing that positivism might obliterate our capacity to distinguish between what is and what ought to be, Adorno sought a more secure foundation for his critique (...)
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  22. Deborah Cook (2001). Adorno on Mass Societies. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (1):35–52.
  23. Deborah Cook (2001). Habermas on Reason and Revolution. Continental Philosophy Review 34 (3):321-338.
    Identifying self-empowerment as the normative core of the liberal democratic project, Habermas proceeds to dilute the revolutionary character of that project. After describing Habermas' views about legitimation problems in the West, the author examines critically Habermas' claim that democratic practices of self-empowerment must be self-limiting, arguing that under some circumstances (which cannot be specified in advance), more radical forms of self-empowerment may be justified. The author also argues that Habermas' own acknowledgement of the revolutionary character of liberal democracy, along with (...)
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  24. Deborah Cook (2001). The Two Faces of Liberal Democracy in Habermas. Philosophy Today 45 (1):95-104.
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  25. Deborah Cook (2000). Joseph G. Kronick, Derrida and the Future of Literature Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 20 (4):264-265.
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  26. Deborah Cook (2000). Critical Stratagems in Adorno and Habermas: Theories of Ideology and the Ideology of Theory. Historical Materialism 6 (1):67-88.
  27. Deborah Cook (1998). Adorno on Late Capitalism-Totalitarianism and the Welfare State. Radical Philosophy 89:16-26.
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  28. Deborah Cook (1995). The Sundered Totality: Adorno's Freudo-Marxism. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (2):191–215.
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  29. Deborah Cook (1993). Daniel T. O'Hara, Radical Parody: American Culture and Critical Agency After Foucault Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (3):113-115.
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  30. Deborah Cook (1993). Giorgio Agamben, The Coming Community Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (5):209-211.
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  31. Deborah Cook (1993). Peter Bürger, The Decline of Modernism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (6):288-290.
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  32. Deborah Cook (1992). Ruses de Guerre: Baudrillard and Fiske on Media Reception. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 22 (2):227–238.
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  33. Deborah Cook (1991). Hugh Silverman, Ed., Writing the Politics of Difference Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 11 (6):416-418.
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  34. Deborah Cook (1990). Herman Rapaport, Heidegger & Derrida: Reflections on Time and Language Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 10 (10):427-429.
  35. Deborah Cook (1990). Remapping Modernity. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (1):35-45.
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  36. Deborah Cook (1989). Nietzsche, Foucault, Tragedy. Philosophy and Literature 13 (1):140-150.
  37. Deborah Cook (1987). Arthur Kroker and David Cook, The Postmodern Scene: Excremental Culture and Hyperaesthetics Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 7 (3):114-116.
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  38. Deborah Cook (1987). Hans-Robert Jauss and the Exemplarity of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (3):259-267.
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  39. Deborah Cook (1987). Telesprache. Philosophy and Literature 11 (2):292-300.
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  40. Deborah Cook (1986). Reflections on Gadamer's Notion of Sprachlichkeit. Philosophy and Literature 10 (1):84-92.
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  41. Deborah Cook (1986). Translation as a Reading. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (2):143-149.
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