Search results for 'Deborah Faulkner' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Deborah Faulkner & Jonathan K. Foster (2002). The Decoupling of "Explicit" and "Implicit" Processing in Neuropsychological Disorders: Insights Into the Neural Basis of Consciousness? Psyche 8 (2).
    A key element of the distinction between explicit and implicit cognitive functioning is the presence or absence of conscious awareness. In this review, we consider the proposal that neuropsychological disorders can best be considered in terms of a decoupling between preserved implicit or unconscious processing and impaired explicit or conscious processing. Evidence for dissociations between implicit and explicit processes in blindsight, amnesia, object agnosia, prosopagnosia, hemi-neglect, and aphasia is examined. The implications of these findings for a) our understanding of a (...)
     
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  2. Paul Faulkner (2011). Knowledge on Trust. OUP Oxford.
    Paul Faulkner presents a new theory of testimony - the basis of much of what we know. He addresses the questions of what makes it reasonable to accept a piece of testimony, and what warrants belief formed on that basis. He rejects rival theories and argues that testimonial knowledge and testimonially warranted belief are based on trust.
     
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  3.  29
    Joanne Faulkner (2008). "Keeping It in the Family": Sarah Kofman Reading Nietzsche as a Jewish Woman. Hypatia 23 (1):41-64.
    : This article examines Sarah Kofman's interpretation of Nietzsche in light of the claim that interpretation was for her both an articulation of her identity and a mode of deconstructing the very notion of identity. Faulkner argues that Kofman's work on Nietzsche can be understood as autobiographical, in that it served to mediate a relation to her self. Faulkner examines this relation with reference to Klein's model of the child's connection to its mother. By examining Kofman's later writings (...)
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  4.  1
    Joy Faulkner & Carolyn Blyth (1995). Homework: Is It Really Worth All the Bother? Educational Studies 21 (3):447-454.
    Joy Faulkner and Carolyn Blyth are two professional educational psychologists who feel the evidence of research suggests that the setting of homework, which is both appropriate to the subject and correctly administered, can be a valid component of the learning process. Pupils who set a high priority on homework tend to achieve higher academic results, and furthermore, they frequently develop work skills and self‐discipline which will stand them in good stead in the world of work beyond school. The article (...)
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  5. Paul Faulkner (2011). Knowledge on Trust. Oxford University Press Uk.
    We know a lot about the world and our place in it. We have come to this knowledge in a variety of ways. And one central way that we, both as individuals and as a society, have come to know what we do is through communication with others. Much of what we know, we know on the basis of testimony. In Knowledge on Trust, Paul Faulkner presents an epistemological theory of testimony, or a theory that explains how it is (...)
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  6.  85
    Paul Faulkner (2007). On Telling and Trusting. Mind 116 (464):875-902.
    A key debate in the epistemology of testimony concerns when it is reasonable to acquire belief through accepting what a speaker says. This debate has been largely understood as the debate over how much, or little, assessment and monitoring an audience must engage in. When it is understood in this way the debate simply ignores the relationship speaker and audience can have. Interlocutors rarely adopt the detached approach to communication implied by talk of assessment and monitoring. Audiences trust speakers to (...)
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  7. Paul Faulkner (2000). The Social Character of Testimonial Knowledge. Journal of Philosophy 97 (11):581-601.
    Through communication, we form beliefs about the world, its history, others and ourselves. A vast proportion of these beliefs we count as knowledge. We seem to possess this knowledge only because it has been communicated. If those justifications that depended on communication were outlawed, all that would remain would be body of illsupported prejudice. The recognition of our ineradicable dependence on testimony for much of what we take ourselves to know has suggested to many that an epistemological account of testimony (...)
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  8.  10
    Ara Norenzayan, Scott Atran, Jason Faulkner & Mark Schaller (2006). Memory and Mystery: The Cultural Selection of Minimally Counterintuitive Narratives. Cognitive Science 30 (3):531-553.
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  9.  81
    Paul Faulkner (2007). A Genealogy of Trust. Episteme 4 (3):305-321.
    In trusting a speaker we adopt a credulous attitude, and this attitude is basic: it cannot be reduced to the belief that the speaker is trustworthy or reliable. However, like this belief, the attitude of trust provides a reason for accepting what a speaker says. Similarly, this reason can be good or bad; it is likewise epistemically evaluable. This paper aims to present these claims and offer a genealogical justification of them.
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  10.  96
    P. Faulkner (2002). On the Rationality of Our Response to Testimony. Synthese 131 (3):353 - 370.
    The assumption that we largely lack reasons for accepting testimony has dominated its epistemology. Given the further assumption that whatever reasons we do have are insufficient to justify our testimonial beliefs, many conclude that any account of testimonial knowledge must allow credulity to be justified. In this paper I argue that both of these assumptions are false. Our responses to testimony are guided by our background beliefs as to the testimony as a type, the testimonial situation, the testifier's character and (...)
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  11.  9
    Joanne Faulkner (2010). Innocence, Evil, and Human Frailty: Potentiality and the Child in the Writings of Giorgio Agamben. Angelaki 15 (2):203-219.
  12.  61
    Paul Faulkner (2006). Understanding Knowledge Transmission. Ratio 19 (2):156–175.
    We must allow that knowledge can be transmitted. But to allow this is to allow that an individual can know a proposition despite lacking any evidence for it and reaching belief by an unreliable means. So some explanation is required as to how knowledge rather than belief is transmitted. This paper considers two non-individualistic explanations: one in terms of knowledge existing autonomously, the other in terms of it existing as a property of communities. And it attempts to decide what is (...)
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  13. Paul Faulkner (1998). David Hume's Reductionist Epistemology of Testimony. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 79 (4):302–313.
    David Hume advances a reductionist epistemology of testimony: testimonial beliefs are justified on the basis of beliefs formed from other sources. This reduction, however, has been misunderstood. Testimonial beliefs are not justified in a manner identical to ordinary empirical beliefs; it is true, they are justified by observation of the conjunction between testimony and its truth, it is the nature of the conjunctions that has been misunderstood. The observation of these conjunctions provides us with our knowledge of human nature and (...)
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  14.  5
    Paul Faulkner (2012). Replies. Abstracta 6 (3):117-137.
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  15.  64
    Paul Faulkner (2007). What is Wrong with Lying? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):535–557.
    One thing wrong with lying is that it can be manipulative. Understanding why lying can be a form of manipulation involves understanding how our telling someone something can give them a reason to believe it, and understanding this requires seeing both how our telling things can invite trust and how trust can be a reason to believe someone. This paper aims to outline the mechanism by means of which lies can be manipulative and through doing so identify a unique reason (...)
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  16.  75
    Paul Faulkner (2013). Two-Stage Reliabilism, Virtue Reliabilism, Dualism and the Problem of Sufficiency. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 2 (8):121-138.
    Social epistemology should be truth-centred, argues Goldman. Social epistemology should capture the ‘logic of everyday practices’ and describe socially ‘situated’ reasoning, says Fuller. Starting from Goldman’s vision of epistemology, this paper aims to argue for Fuller’s contention. Social epistemology cannot focus solely on the truth because the truth can be got in lucky ways. The same too could be said for reliability. Adding a second layer of epistemic evaluation helps only insofar as the reasons thus specified are appropriately connected to (...)
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  17.  23
    Paul Faulkner (2007). What Is Wrong with Lying? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):535-557.
    One thing wrong with lying is that it can be manipulative. Understanding why lying can be a form of manipulation involves understanding how our telling someone something can give them a reason to believe it, and understanding this requires seeing both how our telling things can invite trust and how trust can be a reason to believe someone. This paper aims to outline the mechanism by means of which lies can be manipulative and through doing so identify a unique reason (...)
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  18.  94
    P. Faulkner (2009). Review: Jennifer Lackey: Learning From Words: Testimony as a Source of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Mind 118 (470):479-485.
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  19.  54
    Paul Faulkner (2013). Really Trying or Merely Trying. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 41 (3):363-380.
    We enjoy first-person authority with respect to a certain class of actions: for these actions, we know what we are doing just because we are doing it. This paper first formulates an epistemological principle that captures this authority in terms of trying to act in a way that one has the capacity to act. It then considers a case of effortful action – running a middle distance race – that threatens this principle. And proposes the solution of changing the metaphysics (...)
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  20.  35
    Paul Faulkner (2012). The Practical Rationality of Trust. Synthese (9):1-15.
    Most action can be explained in Humean or teleological terms; that is, in most cases, one can explain why someone acted by reference to that person’s beliefs and desires. However, trusting and being trustworthy are actions that do not permit such explanation. The action of trusting someone to do something is a matter of expecting someone to act for certain reasons, and acting trustworthily is one of acting for these reasons. It is better to say that people act out of (...)
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  21.  89
    Nadine Faulkner (2010). Wittgenstein's Philosophical Grammar: A Neglected Discussion of Vagueness. Philosophical Investigations 33 (2):159-183.
    In this paper I explore a neglected discussion of vagueness put forward by Wittgenstein in his Philosophical Grammar (1932–34). In this work, unlike Philosophical Investigations (1953), Wittgenstein not only discusses the venerable Sorites paradox but provides a novel conception of vagueness using an analogy with coin tossing and converging intervals. As he sees it, the problematic picture of vagueness arises because we conflate aspects of the functioning of vague concepts with those of non-vague ones. Thus, while we accept that vague (...)
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  22.  20
    Joanne Faulkner (2011). Innocence, Evil, and Human Frailty. Angelaki 15 (2):203-219.
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  23. Paul Faulkner (2011). Epistemology of Testimony. In Östman & Verschueren (eds.), Handbook of Pragmatics. John Benjamins
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  24.  18
    Frank J. Faulkner (2010). Can I Play with Madness? The Psychopathy of Evil, Leadership, and Political Mis-Management. In Nancy Billias (ed.), Promoting and Producing Evil. Rodopi 63--273.
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  25.  4
    Joanne Faulkner (2011). Negotiating Vulnerability Through “Animal” and “Child” Agamben and Rancière at the Limit of Being Human. Angelaki 16 (4):73-85.
  26.  7
    Joanne Faulkner (2011). Negotiating Vulnerability Through “Animal” and “Child”. Angelaki 16 (4):73 - 85.
    Angelaki, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 73-85, December 2011.
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  27.  39
    Paul Faulkner (2005). On Dreaming and Being Lied To. Episteme 2 (3):149-159.
    As sources of knowledge, perception and testimony are both vulnerable to sceptical arguments. To both arguments a Moorean response is possible: both can be refuted by reference to particular things known by perception and testimony. However, lies and dreams are different possibilities and they are different in a way that undercuts the plausibility of a Moorean response to a scepticism of testimony. The condition placed on testimonial knowledge cannot be trivially satisfi ed in the way the Moorean would suggest. This (...)
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  28.  43
    Paul Faulkner (2004). Relativism and Our Warrant for Scientific Theories. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 12 (3):259 – 269.
    We depend upon the community for justified belief in scientific theory. This dependence can suggest that our individual belief in scientific theory is justified because the community believes it to be justified. This idea is at the heart of an anti-realist epistemology according to which there are no facts about justification that transcend a community's judgement thereof. Ultimately, knowledge and justified belief are simply social statuses. When conjoined with the lemma that communities can differ in what they accept as justified, (...)
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  29.  17
    Joanne Faulkner (2008). The Innocence of Victimhood Versus the" Innocence of Becoming": Nietzsche, 9/11, and the" Falling Man". Journal of Nietzsche Studies 35 (1):67-85.
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  30.  59
    P. Faulkner (2007). Review: The Epistemology of Testimony. [REVIEW] Mind 116 (464):1136-1139.
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  31.  20
    Andrew Faulkner (2008). The Legacy of Aphrodite: Anchises' Offspring in the Homeric Hymn to Aphrodite. American Journal of Philology 129 (1):1-18.
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  32.  28
    Paul Faulkner (2008). Cooperation and Trust in Conversational Exchanges. Theoria 23 (1):23-34.
    A conversation is more than a series of disconnected remarks because it is conducted against a background presumption of cooperation. But what makes it reasonable to presume that one is engaged in a conversation? What makes it reasonable to presume cooperation? This paper considers Grice’s two ways ofanswering this question and argues for the one he discarded. It does so by means of considering a certain problem and analysis of trust.
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  33.  8
    Jo Faulkner (2005). Voices From the Depths: Reading" Love" in Luce Irigaray's Marine Lover. Diacritics 33 (1):81-94.
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  34.  44
    Paul Faulkner (2003). Review: Good Knowledge, Bad Knowledge. [REVIEW] Mind 112 (446):346-349.
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  35.  33
    Paul Faulkner (2004). Review: Thinking About Knowing. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):390-394.
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  36.  12
    Paul Faulkner (2012). "Précis of" Knowledge on Trust". Abstracta 6 (3):4-5.
  37.  30
    Keith W. Faulkner (2002). Deleuze IN UTERO : Deleuze-Sartre and the Essence of Woman. Angelaki 7 (3):25 – 43.
  38.  17
    Philip Faulkner (2002). The Human Agent in Behavioural Finance: A Searlean Perspective. Journal of Economic Methodology 9 (1):31-52.
    According to John Searle's theory of human ontology, intentional mental states such as beliefs and wants rely on non-intentional, Background, dispositions to produce rational behaviour. The distinction between intentional and non-intentional states is used as the basis on which to understand the various conceptions of human agency to be found in behavioural finance. The agent of behavioural finance is characterized in terms of three sets of psychological traits: prospect theory, heuristics and mental accounting. These are examined from a Searlean perspective (...)
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  39.  17
    Paul Faulkner (2011). Carson , Thomas L. Lying and Deception: Theory and Practice .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 288. $65.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (4):799-803.
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  40.  6
    Andrew T. Faulkner (2002). S. Saïd, M. Trédé, A. Le Boulluec: Histoire de la littérature grecque . Pp. xvi + 720. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France, 1997. Paper, frs. 144. ISBN: 2-13-048233-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (02):364-.
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  41.  19
    Paul Faulkner (2008). Can We Agree to Disagree? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (2):282-285.
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  42.  16
    A. O'Neil Deborah, M. Hopkins Margaret & Diana Bilimoria (2008). Women's Careers at the Start of the 21st Century: Patterns and Paradoxes. Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4).
    In this article we assess the extant literature on women’s careers appearing in selected career, management and psychology journals from 1990 to the present to determine what is currently known about the state of women’s careers at the dawn of the 21st century. Based on this review, we identify four patterns that cumulatively contribute to the current state of the literature on women’s careers: women’s careers are embedded in women’s larger-life contexts, families and careers are central to women’s lives, women’s (...)
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  43.  13
    P. Faulkner (2000). Testimonial Knowledge. Acta Analytica 15 (24):127-138.
    The motivation for adopting reductive and anti-reductive theories of testimonial warrant is considered. Whilst both well-motivated neither position can adequately capture the dynamic aspect of the individual knowers relationship to the wider community of knowledge. A hybrid theory of testimony is proposed that attempts to do just this.
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  44.  9
    Nadine Faulkner (2005). Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism. Dialogue 44 (1):201-204.
  45.  8
    Joanne Faulkner (2012). Innocents and Oracles: The Child as a Figure of Knowledge and Critique in the Middle-Class Philosophical Imagination. Critical Horizons 12 (3):323 - 346.
    This paper argues that the figure of the child performs a critical function for the middle-class social imaginary, representing both an essential “innocence” of the liberal individual, and an excluded, unconscious remainder of its project of control through the management of knowledge. While childhood is invested with affect and value, children’s agency and opportunities for social participation are restricted insofar as they are seen both to represent an elementary humanity and to fall short of full rationality, citizenship and identity. The (...)
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  46.  4
    Andrew T. Faulkner (2002). J. A. Koumoulides (Ed.): Greece: The Legacy. Essays on the History of Greece, Ancient, Byzantine and Modern . Pp. X + 127. Bethesda: University Press of Maryland, 1998. Cased, $30. ISBN: 1-883053-43-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 52 (01):182-.
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  47.  9
    Andrew Faulkner (2010). John Geometres (E.M.) Van Opstall (Ed., Trans.) Jean Géomètre. Poèmes En Hexamètres Et En Distiques Élégiaques. (The Medieval Mediterranean 75.) Pp. Xvi + 606, Pls. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2008. Cased, €160, US$234. ISBN: 978-90-04-16444-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):103-.
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  48.  8
    Nadine Faulkner (2005). Theorizing Backlash: Philosophical Reflections on the Resistance to Feminism Edited by Anita M. Superson and Ann E. Cudd Studies in Social, Political, and Legal Philosophy Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002, Xxiii + 269 Pp. [REVIEW] Dialogue 44 (01):201-.
  49.  8
    M. Swiderski Deborah, M. Ettinger Katharine, Nancy Mayris Webber & N. Dubler (2010). The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project: Preliminary Notes From a Pilot Project to Establish Quality Measures for Ethics Consultation. HEC Forum 22 (1).
    The Clinical Ethics Credentialing Project (CECP) was intiated in 2007 in response to the lack of uniform standards for both the training of clinical ethics consultants, and for evaluating their work as consultants. CECP participants, all practicing clinical ethics consultants, met monthly to apply a standard evaluation instrument, the “QI tool”, to their consultation notes. This paper describes, from a qualitative perspective, how participants grappled with applying standards to their work. Although the process was marked by resistance and disagreement, it (...)
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  50.  5
    Andrew Faulkner (2012). Aristotle as Poet Ford Aristotle as Poet. The Song for Hermias and Its Contexts. Pp. Xx + 243. New York: Oxford University Press, 2011. Cased, £30. ISBN: 978-0-19-973329-3. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (2):420-422.
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