Search results for 'Deborah Fraser *' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. Fraser (1990). Slaying the Republican Dragon: Reply to David Fraser. Telos 1990 (85):79-88.score: 180.0
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  2. D. Fraser (1990). Fraser Vs. Fraser. Telos 84:185-192.score: 180.0
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  3. Nancy Fraser (2007). Chapter One Reframing Justice in a Globalising World Nancy Fraser. In Julie Connolly, Michael Leach & Lucas Walsh (eds.), Recognition in Politics: Theory, Policy and Practice. Cambridge Scholars. 16.score: 180.0
     
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  4. Nancy Fraser (2009). Scales of Justice: Reimagining Political Space in a Globalizing World. Columbia University Press.score: 60.0
    Targeting injustices that cut across borders, they are making the scale of justice an object of explicit struggle.Inspired by these efforts, Nancy Fraser asks: ...
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  5. Nancy Fraser (1997). Justice Interruptus: Critical Reflections on the "Postsocialist" Condition. Routledge.score: 60.0
    What does it mean to think critically about politics at a time when inequality is increasing worldwide, when struggles for the recognition of difference are eclipsing struggles for social equality, and when we lack any credible vision of an alternative to the present order? Philosopher Nancy Fraser claims that the key is to overcome the false oppositions of "postsocialist" commonsense. Refuting the view that we must choose between "the politics of recognition" and the "politics of redistribution," Fraser argues (...)
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  6. Giles Fraser (2002). Redeeming Nietzsche: On the Piety of Unbelief. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Best known for having declared the death of God, Nietzsche was a thinker thoroughly absorbed in the Christian tradition in which he was born and raised. Yet while the atheist Nietzsche is well known, the pious Nietzsche is seldom recognised and rarely understood. Redeeming Nietzsche examines the residual theologian in the most vociferous of atheists. Fraser demonstrates that although Nietzsche rejected God, he remained obsessed with the question of human salvation. Examining his accounts of art, truth, morality and eternity, (...)
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  7. David Fraser (2012). A “Practical” Ethic for Animals. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (5):721-746.score: 60.0
    Abstract Drawing on the features of “practical philosophy” described by Toulmin ( 1990 ), a “practical” ethic for animals would be rooted in knowledge of how people affect animals, and would provide guidance on the diverse ethical concerns that arise. Human activities affect animals in four broad ways: (1) keeping animals, for example, on farms and as companions, (2) causing intentional harm to animals, for example through slaughter and hunting, (3) causing direct but unintended harm to animals, for example by (...)
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  8. Clara Fraser (1998). Revolution, She Wrote. Red Letter Press.score: 60.0
    "Seattle's Grande Dame of Socialism, " Fraser is a groundbreaking theorist and lively popularizer of socialist feminist ideas, and the writing in this volume ...
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  9. J. T. Fraser (1990). Of Time, Passion, and Knowledge: Reflections on the Strategy of Existence. Princeton University Press.score: 60.0
    "Only a wayfarer born under unruly stars would attempt to put into practice in our epoch of proliferating knowledge the Heraclitean dictum that `men who love wisdom must be inquirers into very many things indeed.'" Thus begins this remarkable interdisciplinary study of time by a master of the subject. And while developing a theory of "time as conflict," J. T. Fraser does offer "many things indeed"--an enormous range of ideas about matter, life, death, evolution, and value.
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  10. Nancy Fraser (2007). Re-Faming Justice in a Globalizing World. In Terry Lovell (ed.), (Mis)Recognition, Social Inequality and Social Justice: Nancy Fraser and Pierre Bourdieu. Routledge.score: 60.0
  11. Chris Fraser, Realism Reconsidered.score: 60.0
    Correspondence: Chris Fraser (J) (Assistant Professor) Department of Philosophy Rm. 430, Fung King Hey Bldg. Chinese University of Hong Kong Shatin, N.T., Hong Kong Telephone: 852-9782-0560 Fax: 852-2603-5323 E-mail: cjfraser@cuhk.edu.hk..
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  12. Nancy Fraser (1994). After the Family Wage: Gender Equity and the Welfare State. Political Theory 22 (4):591-618.score: 30.0
  13. Nancy Fraser (1995). Recognition or Redistribution? A Critical Reading of Iris Young's Justice and the Politics of Difference. Journal of Political Philosophy 3 (2):166–180.score: 30.0
  14. Joshua Knobe & Ben Fraser (2008). Causal Judgment and Moral Judgment: Two Experiments. In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Moral Psychology. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    It has long been known that people’s causal judgments can have an impact on their moral judgments. To take a simple example, if people conclude that a behavior caused the death of ten innocent children, they will therefore be inclined to regard the behavior itself as morally wrong. So far, none of this should come as any surprise. But recent experimental work points to the existence of a second, and more surprising, aspect of the relationship between causal judgment and moral (...)
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  15. Nancy Fraser (1985). Michel Foucault: A "Young Conservative"? Ethics 96 (1):165-184.score: 30.0
  16. Doreen Fraser (2009). Quantum Field Theory: Underdetermination, Inconsistency, and Idealization. Philosophy of Science 76 (4):536-567.score: 30.0
    Quantum field theory (QFT) presents a genuine example of the underdetermination of theory by empirical evidence. There are variants of QFT—for example, the standard textbook formulation and the rigorous axiomatic formulation—that are empirically indistinguishable yet support different interpretations. This case is of particular interest to philosophers of physics because, before the philosophical work of interpreting QFT can proceed, the question of which variant should be subject to interpretation must be settled. New arguments are offered for basing the interpretation of QFT (...)
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  17. Doreen Fraser (2008). The Fate of 'Particles' in Quantum Field Theories with Interactions. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 39 (4):841-859.score: 30.0
    Most philosophical discussion of the particle concept that is afforded by quantum field theory has focused on free systems. This paper is devoted to a systematic investigation of whether the particle concept for free systems can be extended to interacting systems. The possible methods of accomplishing this are considered and all are found unsatisfactory. Therefore, an interacting system cannot be interpreted in terms of particles. As a consequence, quantum field theory does not support the inclusion of particles in our ontology. (...)
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  18. John Earman & Doreen Fraser (2006). Haag's Theorem and its Implications for the Foundations of Quantum Field Theory. Erkenntnis 64 (3):305 - 344.score: 30.0
    Although the philosophical literature on the foundations of quantum field theory recognizes the importance of Haag’s theorem, it does not provide a clear discussion of the meaning of this theorem. The goal of this paper is to make up for this deficit. In particular, it aims to set out the implications of Haag’s theorem for scattering theory, the interaction picture, the use of non-Fock representations in describing interacting fields, and the choice among the plethora of the unitarily inequivalent representations of (...)
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  19. Ben Fraser & Marc Hauser (2010). The Argument From Disagreement and the Role of Cross-Cultural Empirical Data. Mind and Language 25 (5):541-560.score: 30.0
    The Argument from Disagreement (AD) (Mackie, 1977) depends upon empirical evidence for ‘fundamental’ moral disagreement (FMD) (Doris and Stich, 2005; Doris and Plakias, 2008). Research on the Southern ‘culture of honour’ (Nisbett and Cohen, 1996) has been presented as evidence for FMD between Northerners and Southerners within the US. We raise some doubts about the usefulness of such data in settling AD. We offer an alternative based on recent work in moral psychology that targets the potential universality of morally significant (...)
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  20. Chris Fraser (2006). Zhuangzi, Xunzi, and the Paradoxical Nature of Education. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (4):529–542.score: 30.0
  21. Nancy Fraser (2005). Mapping the Feminist Imagination:From Redistribution to Recognition to Representation. Constellations 12 (3):295-307.score: 30.0
  22. Nancy Fraser (2003). Redistribution or Recognition?: A Political-Philosophical Exchange. Verso.score: 30.0
    This volume stages a debate between two philosophers, one North American, the other German, who hold different views of the relation of redistribution to ...
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  23. Nancy Fraser (1989). Talking About Needs: Interpretive Contests as Political Conflicts in Welfare-State Societies. Ethics 99 (2):291-313.score: 30.0
  24. Ben Fraser (2012). The Nature of Moral Judgements and the Extent of the Moral Domain. Philosophical Explorations 15 (1):1-16.score: 30.0
    A key question for research on the evolutionary origins of morality concerns just what the target of an evolutionary explanation of morality should be. Some researchers focus on behaviors, others on systems of norms, yet others on moral emotions. Richard Joyce (2006) offers an evolutionary explanation for the trait of making moral judgments. Here, I defend Joyce’s account of moral judgment against two objections from Stephen Stich (2008). Stich’s first objection concerns the supposed universality of moral judgments as Joyce conceives (...)
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  25. Nancy Fraser (2000). Why Overcoming Prejudice is Not Enough: A Rejoinder to Richard Rorty. Critical Horizons 1 (1):21-28.score: 30.0
    Misrecognition, taken seriously as unjust social subordination, cannot be remedied by eliminating prejudice alone. In this rejoinder to Richard Rorty, it is argued that a politics of recognition and a politics of redistribution can and should be combined. However, an identity politics that displaces redistribution and reifies group differences is deeply flawed. Here, instead, an alternative 'status' model of recognition politics is offered that encourages struggles to overcome status subordination and fosters parity of participation. Integrating this politics of recognition with (...)
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  26. Ben Fraser (2010). Adaptation, Exaptation, By-Products and Spandrels in Evolutionary Explanations of Morality. Biological Theory 5 (3):223-227.score: 30.0
    Adaptationist accounts of morality attempt to explain the evolution of morality in terms of the selective advantage that judging in moral terms secured for our ancestors (e.g. Ruse 1998; Joyce 2006; Street 2006). So-called by-product explanations of morality have been presented as an alternative to adaptationist accounts (e.g. Prinz 2009; Ayala 2010; cf. Darwin 2004/1871). In assessing the relationship between adaptationist and by-product accounts, care must be taken to distinguish several related but importantly different notions: innateness, adaptation, exaptation, spandrel, and (...)
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  27. J. Simner, C. Mulvenna, N. Sagiv, E. Tsakanikos, S. A. Witherby, C. Fraser, K. Scott & J. Ward (2006). Synaesthesia: The Prevalence of Atypical Cross-Modal Experiences. Perception 35 (8):1024-33.score: 30.0
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  28. David Fraser (2008). Understanding Animal Welfare: The Science in its Cultural Context. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 30.0
    A unique and thought-provoking exploration of the complex and often contradictory field of animal welfare science.
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  29. Chris Fraser (2007). Language and Ontology in Early Chinese Thought. Philosophy East and West 57 (4):420-456.score: 30.0
    : This essay critiques Chad Hansen’s "mass noun hypothesis," arguing that though most Classical Chinese nouns do function as mass nouns, this fact does not support the claim that pre-Qin thinkers treat the extensions of common nouns as mereological wholes, nor does it explain why they adopt nominalist semantic theories. The essay shows that early texts explain the use of common nouns by appeal to similarity relations, not mereological relations. However, it further argues that some early texts do characterize the (...)
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  30. Nancy Fraser (2003). From Discipline to Flexibilization? Rereading Foucault in the Shadow of Globalization. Constellations 10 (2):160-171.score: 30.0
  31. Nancy Fraser (1996). Multiculturalism and Gender Equity: The U.S. "Difference" Debates Revisited. Constellations 3 (1):61-72.score: 30.0
  32. J. T. Fraser (1987). Time, the Familiar Stranger. University of Massachusetts Press.score: 30.0
    Looks at the history of the idea of time, the origins of the universe, relativity, life, the brain's perception of time, aging, death, memory, and time keeping ...
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  33. D. Fraser (2004). Meinard Kuhlmann, Holger Lyre and Andrew Wayne, Editors, Ontological Aspects of Quantum Field Theory, World Scientific Publishing, London (2002) ISBN 981-238-182-1 (376 Pp., US $98, £ 73). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 35 (4):721-723.score: 30.0
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  34. Chris Fraser (2011). Knowledge and Error in Early Chinese Thought. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):127-148.score: 30.0
    Drawing primarily on the Mòzǐ and Xúnzǐ, the article proposes an account of how knowledge and error are understood in classical Chinese epistemology and applies it to explain the absence of a skeptical argument from illusion in early Chinese thought. Arguments from illusion are associated with a representational conception of mind and knowledge, which allows the possibility of a comprehensive or persistent gap between appearance and reality. By contrast, early Chinese thinkers understand mind and knowledge primarily in terms of competence (...)
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  35. Chris Fraser, Weakness of Will, the Background, and Chinese Thought.score: 30.0
    This essay applies John Searle’s account of weakness of will to explore the classical Chinese problem of weak-willed action. Searle’s discussion focuses on the shortcomings of the Western classical model of rationality in explaining weakness of will, so he naturally says little about the practical ethical problem of overcoming weak-willed action, the focus of the relevant Chinese texts. Yet his theory of action, specifically his notion of the Background, suggests a compelling approach to the practical issue, one that converges with (...)
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  36. Ben Fraser (2011). Explaining Strong Reciprocity: Cooperation, Competition, and Partner Choice. [REVIEW] Biological Theory 6 (2):113-119.score: 30.0
    Paul Seabright argues that strong reciprocity was crucial in the evolution of large-scale cooperation. He identifies three potential evolutionary explanations for strong reciprocity. Drawing (like Seabright) on experimental economics, I identify and elaborate a fourth explanation for strong reciprocity, which proceeds in terms of partner choice, costly signaling, and competitive altruism.
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  37. Chris Fraser, Mohism. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
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  38. Chris Fraser, Mohist Canons. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    The Mohist Canons are a set of brief statements on a variety of philosophical and other topics by anonymous members of the Mohist school , an influential philosophical, social, and religious movement of China's Warring States period (479-221 B.C.). [1] Written and compiled most likely between the late 4th and mid 3rd century B.C., the Canons are often referred to as the “later Mohist” or “Neo-Mohist” canons, since they seem chronologically later than the bulk of the Mohist writings, most of (...)
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  39. Chris Fraser, Thematic Relationships in Mozi 8-13.score: 30.0
    Summary. Analyses of the Mohist triads tend to rely mainly on observations about linguistic or rhetorical features. In this study, I aim to supplement such research by offering observations about the thematic content of the Shang- xian ©|½å and Shangtong ©|¦P triads (MZ 8-10 and 11-13). I argue that my observations are best explained by the hypothesis that the essays in both triads were compiled in the order shang-zhong-xia ¤W¤¤¤U . I also suggest that the writers of the later texts (...)
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  40. Ian Fraser (2003). Charles Taylor on Transcendence: Benjamin, Bloch and Beyond. Philosophy and Social Criticism 29 (3):297-314.score: 30.0
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  41. Zachary Luke Fraser (2006). Gilles Deleuze's Difference and Repetition: A Critical Introduction and Guide James Williams Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2003, Vi + 216 Pp., $24.00 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 45 (04):817-.score: 30.0
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  42. Chris Fraser (2008). Moism and Self-Interest. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):437-454.score: 30.0
  43. Chris Fraser, School of Names. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.0
    The “School of Names” ming jia ) is the traditional Chinese label for a diverse group of Warring States (479-221 B.C.) thinkers who shared an interest in language, disputation, and metaphysics. They were notorious for logic-chopping, purportedly idle conceptual puzzles, and paradoxes such as “Today go to Yue but arrive yesterday” and “A white horse is not a horse.” Because reflection on language in ancient China centered on “names”.
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  44. Kim Sterelny, Richard Joyce, Brett Calcott & Ben Fraser (eds.) (2013). Cooperation and its Evolution. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    This collection reports on the latest research on an increasingly pivotal issue for evolutionary biology: cooperation. The chapters are written from a variety of disciplinary perspectives and utilize research tools that range from empirical survey to conceptual modeling, reflecting the rich diversity of work in the field. They explore a wide taxonomic range, concentrating on bacteria, social insects, and, especially, humans. -/- Part I (“Agents and Environments”) investigates the connections of social cooperation in social organizations to the conditions that make (...)
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  45. Chris Fraser (2005). Two Roads to Wisdom? Chinese and Analytic Philosophical Traditions. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):331–336.score: 30.0
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  46. Chris Fraser (2008). Psychological Emptiness in theZhuāngzǐ. Asian Philosophy 18 (2):123-147.score: 30.0
    Three views of psychological emptiness, or x?, can be found in the Zhu?ngz?. The instrumental view values x? primarily as a means of efficacious action. The moderate view assigns it intrinsic value as an element of one Zhuangist vision of the good life. The radical view also takes it to be an element of the ideal life, but in this case the form of life advocated is that of the Daoist sage, who transcends mundane human concerns to merge with nature (...)
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  47. Ben Fraser (2012). Costly Signalling Theories: Beyond the Handicap Principle. Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):263-278.score: 30.0
    Two recent overviews of costly signalling theory—Maynard-Smith and Harper ( 2003 ) and Searcy and Nowicki ( 2005 )—both refuse to count signals kept honest by punishment of dishonesty, as costly signals, because (1) honest signals must be costly in cases of costly signalling, and (2) punishment of dishonesty itself requires explanation. I argue that both pairs of researchers are mistaken: (2) is not a reason to discount signals kept honest by punishment of dishonesty as cases of costly signalling, and (...)
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  48. Chris Fraser (2011). Emotion and Agency in Zhuāngz. Asian Philosophy 21 (1):97-121.score: 30.0
    Among the many striking features of the philosophy of the Zhu?ngz? is that it advocates a life unperturbed by emotions, including even pleasurable, positive emotions such as joy or delight. Many of us see emotions as an ineluctable part of life, and some would argue they are a crucial component of a well-developed moral sensitivity and a good life. The Zhuangist approach to emotion challenges such commonsense views so radically that it amounts to a test case for the fundamental plausibility (...)
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  49. Ben Fraser (2013). False Advertising in Biological Markets: Partner Choice and the Problem of Reliability. In K. Sterelny, R. Joyce, B. Calcott & B. Fraser (eds.), Cooperation and its Evolution. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    The partner choice approach to understanding the evolution of cooperation builds on approaches that focus on partner control by considering processes that occur prior to pair or group formation. Proponents of the partner choice approach rightly note that competition to be chosen as a partner can help solve the puzzle of cooperation. I aim to build on the partner choice approach by considering the role of signalling in partner choice. Partnership formation often requires reliable information. Signalling is thus important in (...)
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  50. Mariam Fraser, Sarah Kember & Celia Lury (eds.) (2006). Inventive Life: Approaches to the New Vitalism. Sage.score: 30.0
    This book demonstrates how and why vitalism—the idea that life cannot be explained by the principles of mechanism—matters now. Vitalism resists closure and reductionism in the life sciences while simultaneously addressing the object of life itself. The aim of this collection is to consider the questions that vitalism makes it possible to ask: questions about the role and status of life across the sciences, social sciences, and humanities and questions about contingency, indeterminacy, relationality and change. All have special importance now, (...)
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