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  1. John Caputo, Baruch Brody, William L. McBride, Richard Schacht, Frank Dilley, Lucius Outlaw, Deborah G. Johnson, William Mann, Rex Martin & Bernard Gert (forthcoming). Reports of APA Committees. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association.
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  2. Merel Noorman & Deborah G. Johnson (2014). Negotiating Autonomy and Responsibility in Military Robots. Ethics and Information Technology 16 (1):51-62.
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  3. Deborah G. Johnson (2010). Sorting Out the Question of Feminist Technology. In Linda L. Layne, Sharra Louise Vostral & Kate Boyer (eds.), Feminist Technology. University of Illinois Press. 21--58.
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  4. Deborah G. Johnson (2009). Philosophy and Design From Engineering to Architecture. Techné 13 (2):162-164.
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  5. Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers (2009). Ethics and Technology: A Program for Future Research. In M. Winston and R. Edelbach (ed.), Society, Ethics, and Technology, 4th edition.
    This chapter is reprinted from our lead essay in the Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics, ed. C. Mitcham, Gale, 2005.
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  6. Deborah G. Johnson & Keith W. Miller (2008). Un-Making Artificial Moral Agents. Ethics and Information Technology 10 (2-3):123-133.
    Floridi and Sanders, seminal work, “On the morality of artificial agents” has catalyzed attention around the moral status of computer systems that perform tasks for humans, effectively acting as “artificial agents.” Floridi and Sanders argue that the class of entities considered moral agents can be expanded to include computers if we adopt the appropriate level of abstraction. In this paper we argue that the move to distinguish levels of abstraction is far from decisive on this issue. We also argue that (...)
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  7. Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers (2008). Computers as Surrogate Agents. In M. J. van den Joven & J. Weckert (eds.), Information Technology and Moral Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 251.
  8. Deborah G. Johnson (2007). Ethics and Technology 'in the Making': An Essay on the Challenge of Nanoethics. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 1 (1):21-30.
    After reviewing portions of the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act that call for examination of societal and ethical issues, this essay seeks to understand how nanoethics can play a role in nanotechnology development. What can and should nanoethics aim to achieve? The focus of the essay is on the challenges of examining ethical issues with regard to a technology that is still emerging, still ‘in the making.’ The literature of science and technology studies (STS) is used to understand (...)
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  9. Deborah G. Johnson (2006). Corporate Excellence, Ethics, and the Role of IT. Business and Society Review 111 (4):457-470.
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  10. Deborah G. Johnson (2006). Computer Systems: Moral Entities but Not Moral Agents. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 8 (4):195-204.
    After discussing the distinction between artifacts and natural entities, and the distinction between artifacts and technology, the conditions of the traditional account of moral agency are identified. While computer system behavior meets four of the five conditions, it does not and cannot meet a key condition. Computer systems do not have mental states, and even if they could be construed as having mental states, they do not have intendings to act, which arise from an agent’s freedom. On the other hand, (...)
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  11. Deborah G. Johnson & Thomas M. Powers (2005). Computer Systems and Responsibility: A Normative Look at Technological Complexity. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 7 (2):99-107.
    In this paper, we focus attention on the role of computer system complexity in ascribing responsibility. We begin by introducing the notion of technological moral action (TMA). TMA is carried out by the combination of a computer system user, a system designer (developers, programmers, and testers), and a computer system (hardware and software). We discuss three sometimes overlapping types of responsibility: causal responsibility, moral responsibility, and role responsibility. Our analysis is informed by the well-known accounts provided by Hart and Hart (...)
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  12. Deborah G. Johnson (2001). Commentary on “Sherry's Secret”. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):151-152.
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  13. Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani (2001). Introduction to Computer Ethics: Philosophy Enquiry. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 3 (1):1-2.
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  14. Deborah G. Johnson (2000). Editorial. Ethics and Information Technology 2 (3):373-375.
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  15. Deborah G. Johnson, James H. Moor & Herman T. Tavani (2000). Computer Ethics: Philosophical Enquiry. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 30 (4):6-9.
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  16. Deborah G. Johnson (1999). Reframing the Question of Forbidden Knowledge for Modern Science. Science and Engineering Ethics 5 (4):445-461.
    In this paper I use the concept of forbidden knowledge to explore questions about putting limits on science. Science has generally been understood to seek and produce objective truth, and this understanding of science has grounded its claim to freedom of inquiry. What happens to decision making about science when this claim to objective, disinterested truth is rejected? There are two changes that must be made to update the idea of forbidden knowledge for modern science. The first is to shift (...)
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  17. Jean-François Blanchette & Deborah G. Johnson (1998). Cryptography, Data Retention, and the Panopticon Society (Abstract). Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (2):1-2.
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  18. Deborah G. Johnson & Keith Miller (1998). Anonymity, Pseudonymity, or Inescapable Identity on the Net (Abstract). Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 28 (2):37-38.
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  19. Deborah G. Johnson (1997). Is the Global Information Infrastructure a Democratic Technology? Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 27 (3):20-26.
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  20. Deborah G. Johnson (1996). Forbidden Knowledge and Science as Professional Activity. The Monist 79 (2):197-217.
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  21. Rachelle D. Hollander, Deborah G. Johnson, Jonathan R. Beckwith & Betsy Fader (1995). Why Teach Ethics in Science and Engineering? Science and Engineering Ethics 1 (1):83-87.
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  22. Eric A. Weiss, Justin Leiber, Judith Felson Duchan, Mallory Selfridge, Eric Dietrich, Peter A. Facione, Timothy Joseph Day, Johan M. Lammens, Andrew Feenberg, Deborah G. Johnson, Daniel S. Levine & Ted A. Warfield (1995). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 5 (1):109-155.
  23. Deborah G. Johnson (1993). A Reply to "Should Computer Programs Be Ownable?". Metaphilosophy 24 (1-2):85-90.
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  24. Deborah G. Johnson (1993). Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, Second Edition by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994). Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
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  25. Deborah G. Johnson (1993). Book Excerpt: Computer Ethics, by Deborah G. Johnson (Prentice Hall, 1994). Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 23 (3-4):10-14.
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  26. Deborah G. Johnson (1992). Do Engineers Have Social Responsibilities? Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):21-34.
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  27. Deborah G. Johnson (1985). Should Computer Programs Be Owned? Metaphilosophy 16 (4):276-288.
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  28. Deborah G. Johnson (1985). Equal Access to Computing, Computing Expertise, and Decision Making About Computers. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 4 (3/4):95-104.
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  29. Deborah G. Johnson (1985). Ethical Issues Surrounding Toxic Substances. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 2 (4):43-48.
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  30. Deborah G. Johnson (1984). Ethical Issues in Computing. Metaphilosophy 15 (1):68–73.
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  31. Albert Flores & Deborah G. Johnson (1983). Collective Responsibility and Professional Roles. Ethics 93 (3):537-545.
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  32. Deborah G. Johnson (1982). Moral Accountability in Corporations. Philosophical Topics 13 (Supplement):143-151.
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  33. Deborah G. Johnson & Knut Ringen (1980). Health Risks and Equal Opportunity. Hastings Center Report 10 (6):25-26.
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