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  1. Deborah K. Heikes (2012). Being Reasonable. Southwest Philosophy Review 28 (1):187-195.
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  2. Deborah K. Heikes (2010/2011). Rationality and Feminist Philosophy. Continuum.
    Exploring the history of the concept of 'rationality', Deborah K. Hakes argues that feminism should seek to develop a virtue theory of rationality.
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  3. Deborah K. Heikes (2009). Let's Be Reasonable. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (1):127-134.
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  4. Deborah K. Heikes (2004). The Bias Paradox: Why It's Not Just for Feminists Anymore. Synthese 138 (3):315 - 335.
    The bias paradox emerges out of a tension between objectivism and relativism.If one rejects a certain the conception objectivity as absolute impartiality and value-neutrality (i.e., if all views are biased), how, then, can one hold that some epistemic perspectives are better than others? This is a problem that has been most explicitly dealt with in feminist epistemology, but it is not unique to feminist perspectives. In this paper, I wish to clearly lay out the nature of the paradox and the (...)
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  5. Deborah K. Heikes (2004). Wittgenstein and the Private Language of Ethlcs. Southwest Philosophy Review 20 (2):27-38.
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  6. Deborah K. Heikes (2003). Schema, Language, and Two Problems Content. Journal of Mind and Behavior 24 (2):155-168.
    Human cognition is often taken to be a rule-governed system of representations that serve to guide our beliefs about our actions in the world around us. This view, though, has two problems: it must explain how the conceptually governed contents of the mind can be about objects that exist in a non-conceptual world, and it must explain how the non-conceptual world serves as a constraint on belief. I argue that the solution to these problems is to recognize that cognition has (...)
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  7. Deborah K. Heikes (1998). Concepts, Content, and Consciousness: A Kantian View of Mind. Dissertation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    The mind is, for Kant, a functional system whereby bare sensations are combined into representations of objects and unified within a single consciousness. I argue that this picture allows for realistic mental content and provides a useful explanation of the nature of consciousness. ;However, despite its insights, a Kantian view of mind has two significant difficulties: the first concerns the relationship between mental concepts and objects in the world while the second concerns the relationship of concepts to the consciousness which (...)
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  8. Deborah K. Heikes (1996). The Realism in Quasi-Realism. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (1):75-83.
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