Search results for 'Debra Berghoffen' (try it on Scholar)

504 found
Order:
  1.  60
    Debra Berghoffen (2001). Menage À Trois: Freud, Beauvoir, and the Marquis de Sade. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 34 (2):151-163.
    Without rejecting Simone de Beauvoir's often cited feminist agenda, this paper takes up her less frequently noted insight – that woman's existence as the inessential other is more than a consequence of material dependency, and political inequality. This insight traces women's subordinated status to the effect of a patriarchal desire that produces and is sustained by a political imaginary that is not economically grounded and is not undermined by women's economic or political progress. Taking up this insight, this paper reads (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  13
    Z. Basil Debra, S. Runte Mary & Cathy Barr M. Easwaramoorthy (forthcoming). Company Support for Employee Volunteering: A National Survey of Companies in Canada. Journal of Business Ethics.
    Company support for employee volunteerism (CSEV) benefits companies, employees, and society while helping companies meet the expectations of corporate social responsibility (CSR). A nationally representative telephone survey of 990 Canadian companies examined CSEV through the lens of Porter and Kramer’s (2006, ‘Strategy and society: the link between competitive advantage and corporate social responsibility’, Harvard Business Review , 78–92.) CSR model. The results demonstrated that Canadian companies passively support employee volunteerism in a variety of ways, such as allowing employees to take (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. P. C. Peters Debra, T. Bestelmeyer Brandon & K. Knapp Alan (2011). Perspectives on Global Change Theory. In Samuel M. Scheiner & Michael R. Willig (eds.), The Theory of Ecology. The University of Chicago Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Morris Debra (2003). Surety Wives in the House of Lords: Time for Solicitors Toget Real'? Royal Bank of Scotland Plc V. Etridge (No. 2)[2001] 4 All Er 449. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 11 (1).
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  2
    A. J. Walsh, Noxious Markets, Inequality and Social Meanings: Review of 'Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets', by Debra Satz, New York: Oxford University Press, 2010, Xi + 252 Pp., US$35.00 , ISBN 978-0-19-531159-4. [REVIEW]
    Noxious markets, inequality and social meanings In this thoughtful and timely book, Debra Satz provides a convincing justificatory framework for our ongoing discomfort at the intrusion of markets into many areas of our lives that hitherto had been free from commercial influence. Her central problem is the commodification of everyday life. We inhabit social worlds which are highly commodified and in which the market is often prescribed as a universal panacea for any social problem we confront. Yet despite such (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  7
    Debra Pentecost (1993). Book Review: Media and War: An Essay Review by Debra Pentecost. [REVIEW] Journal of Mass Media Ethics 8 (3):182 – 188.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Debra Satz (2010). Ethics, Economics, and Markets: An Interview with Debra Satz. Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 3 (1):68-88.
  8.  5
    Dirk Baltzly (forthcoming). Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato, Edited by Nails, Debra, and Harold Tarrant. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  33
    David Schmidtz (2011). Debra Satz: Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets. Journal of Philosophy 108 (4):219-223.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  45
    J. S. Swindell Blumenthal-Barby (2010). Harry G. Frankfurt (Author), Christine Korsgaard (Commentary), Michael Bratman (Commentary), Meir Dan-Cohen (Commentary), Debra Satz (Editor), Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):117-121.
    Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right is written in a manner that is accessible to all. Frankfurt’s arguments are, as usual, clear and persuasive. Korsgaard’s, Bratman’s, and Dan-Cohen’s comments are thought provoking. There are, however, two main areas in which Frankfurt’s arguments need clarification (the notion of wholehearted identification, and the concept of ambivalence), and there are misunderstandings of Frankfurt at work in Korsgaard’s (relationship between the self and the will, and concept of the will for Frankfurt) and Bratman’s (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  21
    Rutger Claassen (2012). Why Some Things Should Not Be For Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, by Debra Satz. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):585-597.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  11
    David J. Murphy (2004). The People of Plato: A Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics, by Debra Nails. Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):197-201.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  25
    Jennifer Warriner (2011). The Future of Political Theory? A Review of Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. Edited by Debra Satz and Rob Reich and Women's Rights as Multicultural Claims: Reconfiguring Gender and Diversity in Political Philosophy. By Monica Mookherjee. Hypatia 26 (4):864-871.
  14.  10
    Gary Shapiro (1987). Comments on Debra Bergoffen, “Seducing Historicism”. International Studies in Philosophy 19 (2):99-102.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. James C. Morrison (1987). Marjorie Grene and Debra Nails, Eds., Spinoza and the Sciences Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 7 (12):495-496.
  16.  8
    Willene B. Clark (1999). Debra Hassig, Medieval Bestiaries: Text, Image, Ideology.(RES Monographs on Anthropology and Aesthetics.) Cambridge, Eng.: Cambridge University Press, 1995. Pp. Xx, 300 Plus 176 Black-and-White Figures. $90. [REVIEW] Speculum 74 (2):424-426.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  11
    Micah Baize (2013). "Critical Thinking: A User's Manual," by Debra Jackson and Paul Newberry. Teaching Philosophy 36 (1):71-74.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  7
    Thomas F. Glick (2011). Debra Blumenthal, Enemies and Familiars: Slavery and Mastery in Fifteenth-Century Valencia.(Conjunctions of Religion and Power in the Medieval Past.) Ithaca, NY, and London: Cornell University Press, 2009. Pp. Xix, 306; Black-and-White Figures, 1 Table, and 3 Maps. $42.50. [REVIEW] Speculum 86 (2):472-473.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  7
    Lynne Spellman (1996). Debra Nails, Agora, Academy, and the Conduct of Philosophy. Southwest Philosophy Review 12 (2):241-245.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20.  17
    Kate Fullbrook & Edward Fullbrook (1998). Book Review: Debra B. Bergoffen. The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1997. And Eva Lundgren-Gothlin. Translated by Linda Schenk. Sex and Existence: Simone de Beauvoir's the Second Sex. London: Athlone, 1996. And Karen Vintges. Translated by Anne Lavelle. Philosophy as Passion: The Thinking of Simone de Beauvoir. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1996. [REVIEW] Hypatia 13 (3):181-188.
  21.  6
    Cecile Fabre (2011). Satz, Debra.Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 264. $35.00. Ethics 121 (2):469-475.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  6
    Philip Adey (2007). Developing Thinking, Developing Learning ‐ by Debra McGregor. British Journal of Educational Studies 55 (4):466-468.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  9
    Howard Harris (2013). "Moral Courage in Organizations: Doing the Right Thing at Work," Edited by Debra R. Comer and Gina Vega. Business Ethics Quarterly 23 (1):147-150.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  14
    Richard Parry (2008). Review of James Lesher, Debra Nails, Frisbee Sheffield (Eds.), Plato's Symposium: Issues in Interpretation and Reception. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (1).
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  4
    Chad Van Schoelandt (2010). Review of Debra Satz and Rob Reich (Eds.), Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (4):567-573.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  4
    J. S. Swindell (2010). Harry G. Frankfurt (Author), Christine Korsgaard (Commentary), Michael Bratman (Commentary), Meir Dan-Cohen (Commentary), Debra Satz (Editor), Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):117-121.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  4
    Chad Schoelandt (2010). Review of Debra Satz and Rob Reich (Eds.). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (4):567-573.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28.  10
    Don Garrett (1988). Book Review:Spinoza and the Sciences Marjorie Grene, Debra Nails. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 55 (3):480-.
  29.  9
    Ann E. Cudd (2009). Review of Debra Satz, Rob Reich (Eds.), The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).
  30.  7
    Robert W. Kolodinsky (2012). Debra R. Comer and Gina Vega (Eds.): Moral Courage in Organizations: Doing the Right Thing at Work. Journal of Business Ethics 107 (4):547-550.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Jennifer T. Roberts (2014). Reading Herodotus: A Guided Tour Through the Wild Boars, Dancing Suitors, and Crazy Tyrants of The History by Debra Hamel. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 107 (4):558-559.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  3
    On Conditionals (1994). Rational Choice and Social Theory, Debra Satz And. Journal of Philosophy 91 (3).
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  3
    Jean Conteh (2008). Talking, Listening, Learning: Effective Talk in the Primary Classroom ‐ by Debra Myhill, Susan Jones and Rosemary Hopper. British Journal of Educational Studies 56 (1):103-105.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34.  3
    Nina Rowe (2004). Debra Higgs Strickland, Saracens, Demons, and Jews: Making Monsters in Medieval Art. Princeton, N.J., and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2003. Pp. 336; Color Frontispiece, 15 Color Plates, and Many Black-and-White Figures. $60. [REVIEW] Speculum 79 (4):1155-1158.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Chloe Balla (2005). Debra Nails, The People of Plato: A Prosopography of Plato and Other Socratics, Hackett, Indianapolis/Cambridge, 2002. Rhizai. A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science 1:119-122.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36.  1
    Marc Llambrich (2004). Joan W. Scott y Debra Keates,(Eds.): Schools of Thought. Twenty-Five Years of Interpretive Social Science. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ, 2001. [REVIEW] Foro Interno. Anuario de Teoría Política 4:195-196.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  2
    Robert Brentano (2000). Debra J. Birch, Pilgrimage to Rome in the Middle Ages: Continuity and Change.(Studies in the History of Medieval Religion, 13.) Woodbridge, Suff., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 1998. Pp. X, 238; 3 Maps. $63. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (2):442-442.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  4
    Silvia Stoller (1997). Debra Bergoffen: The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir. Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities. Die Philosophin 8 (16):90-93.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  1
    Ethan B. Kapstein (2011). Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, Debra Satz , 252 Pp., $35 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 25 (2):237-239.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  1
    Autonomy Marriage (2006). Debra B. Bergoffen. In Margaret A. Simons (ed.), The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Critical Essays. Indiana University Press 92.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Robert Brentano (2000). Pilgrimage to Rome in the Middle Ages: Continuity and Change.Debra J. Birch. Speculum 75 (2):442-442.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Willene B. Clark (1999). Medieval Bestiaries: Text, Image, Ideology.Debra Hassig. Speculum 74 (2):424-426.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. Kate Fullbrook & Edward Fullbrook (1998). Book Review: Debra B. Bergoffen. The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities. Albany, New York: State University of New York Press, 1997. And Eva Lundgren-Gothlin. Translated by Linda Schenk. Sex and Existence: Simone de Beauvoir's the Second Sex. London: Athlone, 1996. And Karen Vintges. Translated by Anne Lavelle. Philosophy as Passion: The Thinking of Simone de Beauvoir. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press, 1996. [REVIEW] Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 13 (3):181-188.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. A. Rupert Hall (1988). Spinoza and the SciencesMarjorie Grene Debra Nails. Isis 79 (1):166-166.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Joseph Heath (2011). Review of Debra Satz’s Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale. [REVIEW] Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 4 (1):99-107.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. A. Lichtigfeld (1990). Grene, Marjorie and Nails, Debra , Spinoza and the Sciences. [REVIEW] Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 52:337.
    No categories
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. James Morrison (1987). Marjorie Grene and Debra Nails, Eds., Spinoza and the Sciences. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 7:495-496.
  48. Gertrude Postl (2014). Different Finite Bodies Comment on Debra Bergoffen. In Silvia Stoller (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir's Philosophy of Age: Gender, Ethics, and Time. De Gruyter 143-146.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Ernestine G. E. Van Der Wall (1989). Marjorie Grene and Debra Nails, Eds., "Spinoza and the Sciences". [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (3):479.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  57
    Debra Satz (2010). Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets. OUP Usa.
    In Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale, philosopher Debra Satz takes a penetrating look at those commodity exchanges that strike most of us as problematic. What considerations, she asks, ought to guide the debates about such markets? What is it about a market involving prostitution or the sale of kidneys that makes it morally objectionable? How is a market in weapons or pollution different than a market in soybeans or automobiles? Are laws and social policies banning the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   14 citations  
1 — 50 / 504