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Debra B. Bergoffen [44]Debra Bergoffen [43]
  1.  6
    Debra Bergoffen (1996). The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Gendered Phenomenologies, Erotic Generosities. State University of New York Press.
    Challenges Beauvoir's self-portrait and argues that she was a philosopher in her own right.
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  2. Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
    : This paper may be read as a reclamation project. It argues, with Simone de Beauvoir, that patriarchal marriage is both a perversion of the meaning of the couple and an institution in transition. Parting from those who have given up on marriage, I identify marriage as existing at the intersection of the ethical and the political and argue that whether or not one chooses marriage, feminists ought not abandon marriage as an institution.
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  3. Debra Bergoffen (2008). On Female Body Experience: Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essays (Review). Hypatia 23 (3):pp. 217-220.
  4.  28
    Debra Bergoffen (2014). Gendering Vulnerability: Re-Scripting the Meaning of Male-Male Rape. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 18 (1):164-175.
    The testimonies of men raped by men in Uganda indicate that the meaning of rape as an aggression that enforces the gendering of women as vulnerable and therefore dependent on men's protection needs to be reformulated to account for the fact that being raped transforms a man into a woman. In describing their humiliation, these men reveal that gendered masculinity is grounded in a flight from vulnerability that depends on the presence of vulnerable/rapeable victim bodies. Their words teach us that (...)
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  5.  84
    Debra Bergoffen (2011). Exploiting the Dignity of the Vulnerable Body: Rape as a Weapon of War. Philosophical Papers 38 (3):307-325.
    When the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia convicted the Bosnian Serb soldiers who used rape as a weapon of war of violating the human right to sexual self determination and of crimes against humanity, it transformed vulnerability from a mark of feminine weakness to a shared human condition. The court's judgment directs us to note the ways in which the exploitation of our bodied vulnerability is an assault on our dignity. It alerts us to the ways in which (...)
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  6.  76
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    : On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  7.  15
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1992). The Look as Bad Faith. Philosophy Today 36 (3):221-227.
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  8.  31
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2002). Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre: Woman, Man, and the Desire to Be God. Constellations 9 (3):409-418.
  9.  49
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2005). The Subject of Love. Hypatia 20 (2):202-207.
  10.  6
    Debra Bergoffen (2009). 1 Getting the Beauvoir We Deserve. In Christine Daigle & Jacob Golomb (eds.), Beauvoir and Sartre: The Riddle of Influence. Indiana University Press 13.
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  11.  6
    Debra Bergoffen (2016). Antigone After Auschwitz. Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):249-259.
    In the preface to the 1853 first edition of his poems, Matthew Arnold claimed that it was no longer possible to be interested in the quarrel staged in Antigone. He found the conflict between a sister’s duty to bury her brother and a king’s insistence on obedience to the laws of the state passé.1 Living in an age in which souls mattered more than bodies, and in a time when mass graves filled with murdered and mutilated bodies were not part (...)
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  12. Debra Bergoffen (2003). Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  13.  10
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1999). Marriage, Autonomy, and the Feminine Protest. Hypatia 14 (4):18-35.
  14.  17
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1983). Social Darwinism and English Thought. Teaching Philosophy 6 (4):396-398.
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  15.  14
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1983). Jean-Paul Sartre. International Studies in Philosophy 15 (3):114-115.
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  16.  9
    Debra Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
  17.  8
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2008). The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices. Hypatia 23 (2):72-94.
  18.  19
    Debra Bergoffen (2009). Finitude and Justice. Philosophy Today 53 (Supplement):116-120.
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  19.  67
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2008). The Just War Tradition: Translating the Ethics of Human Dignity Into Political Practices. Hypatia 23 (2):pp. 72-94.
    This essay argues that the ambiguities of the just war tradition, sifted through a feminist critique, provides the best framework currently available for translating the ethical entitlement to human dignity into concrete feminist political practices. It offers a gendered critique of war that pursues the just war distinction between legitimate and illegitimate targets of wartime violence and provides a gendered analysis of the peace which the just war tradition obliges us to preserve and pursue.
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  20.  12
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1992). Casting Shadows. Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 4 (2/3):232-243.
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  21.  9
    Babette E. Babich, Debra B. Bergoffen & Simon Glynn (eds.) (1995). Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science. Avebury.
  22.  31
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1985). The Ethics and Existentialism of Kierkegaard. Teaching Philosophy 8 (1):83-85.
  23.  29
    Debra Bergoffen (2005). Simone de Beauvoir. International Studies in Philosophy 37 (4):169-170.
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  24. Debra Bergoffen (2011). 6 Existentialism and Ethics. In Felicity Joseph, Jack Reynolds & Ashley Woodward (eds.), Continuum Companion to Existentialism. Continuum 98.
     
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  25.  36
    Debra Bergoffen (2008). On Female Body Experience: Throwing Like a Girl and Other Essaysby Iris Marion Young. Hypatia 23 (3):217-220.
  26.  12
    Debra Bergoffen (2003). Beauvoir and the Second Sex. International Studies in Philosophy 35 (2):184-185.
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  27.  37
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2004). Engaging Nietzsche's Women: Ofelia Schutte and the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo. Hypatia 19 (3):157-168.
    : Ofelia Schutte's relationship to Nietzsche is contentious. Sometimes she identifies him as an ally. Sometimes she calls him an enemy. Appealing to Nietzsche's abolition of the appearance reality distinction and to his discussions of women as skeptics, I turn to Ofelia's discussions of the Madres de la Plaza de Mayo to suggest that their protests can be understood as a Nietzschean politics of transvaluation where the myth of the mother and the materialities of women's bodies become the ground of (...)
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  28.  28
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1996). From Husserl to de Beauvoir: Gendering the Perceiving Subject. Metaphilosophy 27 (1-2):53-62.
    This paper breaks ranks with those philosophers and feminists who either ignore de Beauvoir or find her passé. It argues that de Beauvoir is fundamentally a philosopher; that one of her crucial contributions to philosophy was to identify the erotic as a philosophical category; and that we best understand de Beauvoir's place in the feminist and philosophical fields if we read her as a phenomenologist who reworks Husserl's theory of intentionality and who, in this reworking, steps out of Sartre's shadow (...)
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  29.  11
    Debra Bergoffen (2007). Introduction. New Nietzsche Studies 7 (3-4):1-3.
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  30.  10
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1993). Elizabeth Grosz, Jacques Lacan: A Feminist Introduction. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 5 (1):108-111.
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  31.  10
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2010). Casting Shadows: The Body in Descartes, Sartre, de Beavoir, and Lacan. Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 4 (2-3):232-243.
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  32.  6
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2002). Resentment and the "Feminine" in Nietzsche's Politico-Aesthetics (Review). Hypatia 17 (3):268-270.
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  33.  18
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1981). Cartesian Dialectics and the Autonomy of Reason. International Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):1-8.
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  34.  9
    Debra Bergoffen (2012). Simone de Beauvoir and the Marquis de Sade. In Shannon M. Mussett & William S. Wilkerson (eds.), Beauvoir and Western Thought From Plato to Butler. 75.
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  35.  9
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1987). Seducing Historicism. International Studies in Philosophy 19 (2):85-98.
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  36.  27
    Debra Bergoffen (2006). Sartre and the Word. Sartre Studies International 12 (2):83-91.
    Jean Pierre Boulé's Sartre, Self Formation and Masculinities argues that we cannot adequately understand Sartre without taking account of the unique ways in which he negotiated the gender mandates of patriarchy. Taking Boulé's cue, I call on Lacan, Cixous and Beauvoir to interrogate Sartre's relationship to women, to his body and to writing. I argue for Boulé's approach but against several of his conclusions. Further, I credit Boulé with providing ammunition for challenging Lacan's universal account of the mirror stage, and (...)
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  37.  8
    Debra Bergoffen (2012). The Society for Phenomenology and Existential Philosophy, Feminism, and the Epoché. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (2):278-290.
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  38.  17
    Debra Bergoffen & Gail Weiss (2012). Cluster: Contesting the Norms of Embodiment — Editors' Introduction. Hypatia 27 (2):241-242.
  39.  8
    Debra Bergoffen (2003). 12 Simone de Beauvoir:(Re) Counting the Sexual Difference. In Claudia Card (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge University Press 248.
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  40.  17
    Debra Bergoffen & Gail Weiss (2011). Embodying the Ethical—Editors' Introduction. Hypatia 26 (3):453-460.
  41.  7
    Debra Bergoffen (2001). Philosophy as Passion. International Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):152-153.
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  42.  18
    Debra Bergoffen (2005). Book Review: Kelly Oliver. The Subject of Love: A Review of Family Values: Subjects Between Nature and Culture (New York: Routledge, 1997); and Witnessing: Beyond Recognition (Minneapolis, University of Minnesota Press, 2001). [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (2):202-207.
  43.  6
    Debra Bergoffen (2002). Nietzsche's Existential Signatures. International Studies in Philosophy 34 (3):83-93.
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  44.  6
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1994). Nietzsche Was No Feminist . International Studies in Philosophy 26 (3):23-31.
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  45.  7
    Debra Bergoffen (2011). The Philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir: Ambiguity, Conversion, Resistance (Review). Philosophia 1 (2):251-256.
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  46.  5
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1983). Why a Genealogy of Morals? Man and World 16 (2):129-138.
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  47.  3
    Debra Bergoffen (2001). Philosophy as Passion: The Thinking of Simone de Beauvoir. [REVIEW] International Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):152-153.
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  48.  10
    Debra B. Bergoffen (1980). The Moral Value of Philosophy. Journal of Moral Education 9 (2):122-129.
    Abstract Students arrive at their Introduction to Philosophy classes unsure of the nature of Philosophy and sceptical of its value. They usually assume that philosophy is some abstract thing which, whatever it is, is irrelevant to everyday life. This essay explores the ways in which the figures, philosophies and lives of Socrates and Bertrand Russell serve as models of the philosophic perspective. It develops the thesis that we can, by appealing to Socrates and Russell as role models, counter the assumption (...)
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  49. Babette E. Babich, Debra B. Bergoffen & Simon V. Glynn (1995). On the Idea of Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science. In Babette E. Babich, Debra B. Bergoffen & Simon Glynn (eds.), Continental and Postmodern Perspectives in the Philosophy of Science. Avebury 1--7.
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  50.  11
    Debra B. Bergoffen (2003). Thomas Mann and Friedrich Nietzsche: Eroticism, Death, Music, and Language (Review). Journal of Nietzsche Studies 25 (1):92-93.
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