Search results for 'Debra M. Satz' (try it on Scholar)

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Profile: Debra Satz (Stanford University)
  1. Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz (2007). Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):27 – 40.score: 870.0
  2. Henry T. Greely, Mildred K. Cho, Linda F. Hogle & Debra M. Satz (2007). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Thinking About the Human Neuron Mouse". American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):W4 – W6.score: 870.0
  3. Debra Satz (2010). Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets. OUP USA.score: 480.0
    What's wrong with markets in everything? Markets today are widely recognized as the most efficient way in general to organize production and distribution in a complex economy. And with the collapse of communism and rise of globalization, it's no surprise that markets and the political theories supporting them have seen a considerable resurgence. For many, markets are an all-purpose remedy for the deadening effects of bureaucracy and state control. But what about those markets we might label noxious-markets in addictive drugs, (...)
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  4. Debra Satz (2008). The Moral Limits of Markets: The Case of Human Kidneys. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):269-288.score: 240.0
    This paper examines the morality of kidney markets through the lens of choice, inequality, and weak agency looking at the case for limiting such markets under both non-ideal and ideal circumstances. Regulating markets can go some way to addressing the problems of inequality and weak agency. The choice issue is different and this paper shows that the choice for some to sell their kidneys can have external effects on those who do not want to do so, constraining the options that (...)
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  5. Debra Satz (1992). Markets in Women's Reproductive Labor. Philosophy and Public Affairs 21 (2):107-131.score: 240.0
  6. Debra Satz (1995). Markets in Women's Sexual Labor. Ethics 106 (1):63-85.score: 240.0
  7. Debra Satz, Feminist Perspectives on Reproduction and the Family. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 240.0
  8. Debra Satz (2007). Liberalism, Economic Freedom, and the Limits of Markets. Social Philosophy and Policy 24 (1):120-140.score: 240.0
    This paper points to a lost and ignored strand of argument in the writings of liberalism's earliest defenders. These “classical” liberals recognized that market liberty was not always compatible with individual liberty. In particular, they argued that labor markets required intervention and regulation if workers were not to be wholly subjugated to the power of their employers. Functioning capitalist labor markets (along with functioning credit markets) are not “natural” outgrowths of exchange, but achievements hard won in the battle against feudalism. (...)
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  9. Debra Satz & John Ferejohn (1994). Rational Choice and Social Theory. Journal of Philosophy 91 (2):71-87.score: 240.0
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  10. Debra Satz (2005). What Do We Owe the Global Poor? Ethics and International Affairs 19 (1):47–54.score: 240.0
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  11. Debra Satz (2007). Equality, Adequacy, and Education for Citizenship. Ethics 117 (4):623-648.score: 240.0
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  12. Debra Satz (2009). Voluntary Slavery and the Limits of the Market. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 3 (1):87-109.score: 240.0
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  13. Debra Satz (1996). Book Review:Moral Dilemmas of Feminism: Prostitution, Adultery and Abortion. Laurie Shrage. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (4):864-.score: 240.0
  14. John Ferejohn & Debra Satz (1995). Unification, Universalism, and Rational Choice Theory. Critical Review 9 (1-2):71-84.score: 240.0
    Green and Shapiro's critique of rational choice theory underestimates the value of unification and the necessity of universalism in science. The central place of intentionality in social life makes both unification and universalism feasible norms in social science. However, ?universalism? in social science may be partial, in that the independence hypothesis?that the causal mechanism governing action is context independent?may hold only locally in certain classes of choice domains.
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  15. Debra Satz (1990). Free to Lose: An Introduction to Marxist Economic Philosophy, John Roemer. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1988, X + 203 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (02):315-.score: 240.0
  16. Debra Satz & Rob Reich (eds.) (2009). Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. OUP USA.score: 240.0
    The late Susan Moller Okin was a leading political theorist whose scholarship integrated political philosophy and issues of gender, the family, and culture. Okin argued that liberalism, properly understood as a theory opposed to social hierarchies and supportive of individual freedom and equality, provided the tools for criticizing the substantial and systematic inequalities between men and women. Her thought was deeply informed by a feminist view that theories of justice must apply equally to women as men, and she was deeply (...)
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  17. Debra Satz (2010). Ideals of Egalitarianism and Sufficiency in Global Justice. In Colin M. Macleod (ed.), Justice and Equality. University of Calgary Press. 53-71.score: 240.0
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  18. Debra Satz (1990). Marxism, Materialism and Historical Progress. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 15 (sup1):393-424.score: 240.0
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  19. Anita L. Allen, Sandra Lee Bartky, John Christman, Judith Wagner DeCew, Edward Johnson, Lenore Kuo, Mary Briody Mahowald, Kathryn Pauly Morgan, Melinda Roberts, Debra Satz, Susan Sherwin, Anita Superson, Mary Anne Warren & Susan Wendell (1995). 'Nagging' Questions: Feminist Ethics in Everyday Life. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.score: 240.0
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  20. Debra Satz (2007). Countering the Wrongs of the Past: The Role of Compensation. In Jon Miller & Rahul Kumar (eds.), Reparations: Interdisciplinary Inquiries. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
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  21. Debra Satz (2003). International Economic Justice. In LaFollette H. (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
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  22. J. S. Swindell Blumenthal-Barby (2010). Harry G. Frankfurt (Author), Christine Korsgaard (Commentary), Michael Bratman (Commentary), Meir Dan-Cohen (Commentary), Debra Satz (Editor), Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):117-121.score: 120.0
    Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right is written in a manner that is accessible to all. Frankfurt’s arguments are, as usual, clear and persuasive. Korsgaard’s, Bratman’s, and Dan-Cohen’s comments are thought provoking. There are, however, two main areas in which Frankfurt’s arguments need clarification (the notion of wholehearted identification, and the concept of ambivalence), and there are misunderstandings of Frankfurt at work in Korsgaard’s (relationship between the self and the will, and concept of the will for Frankfurt) and Bratman’s (...)
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  23. David Schmidtz (2011). Debra Satz: Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets. Journal of Philosophy 108 (4).score: 120.0
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  24. Jennifer Warriner (2011). The Future of Political Theory? A Review of Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. Edited by Debra Satz and Rob Reich and Women's Rights as Multicultural Claims: Reconfiguring Gender and Diversity in Political Philosophy. By Monica Mookherjee. Hypatia 26 (4):864-871.score: 120.0
  25. Ann E. Cudd (2009). Review of Debra Satz, Rob Reich (Eds.), The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (11).score: 120.0
  26. Rutger Claassen (2012). Why Some Things Should Not Be For Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, by Debra Satz. Business Ethics Quarterly 22 (3):585-597.score: 120.0
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  27. Chad Schoelandt (2010). Review of Debra Satz and Rob Reich (Eds.). [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (4):567-573.score: 120.0
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  28. J. S. Swindell (2010). Harry G. Frankfurt (Author), Christine Korsgaard (Commentary), Michael Bratman (Commentary), Meir Dan-Cohen (Commentary), Debra Satz (Editor), Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right. Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (1):117-121.score: 120.0
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  29. On Conditionals (1994). Rational Choice and Social Theory, Debra Satz And. Journal of Philosophy 91 (3).score: 120.0
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  30. Cecile Fabre (2011). Satz , Debra . Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 264. $35.00 (Cloth). Ethics 121 (2):469-475.score: 120.0
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  31. Chad Van Schoelandt (2010). Review of Debra Satz and Rob Reich (Eds.), Toward a Humanist Justice: The Political Philosophy of Susan Moller Okin. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 44 (4):567-573.score: 120.0
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  32. Ethan B. Kapstein (2011). Why Some Things Should Not Be for Sale: The Moral Limits of Markets, Debra Satz (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010), 252 Pp., $35 Cloth. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 25 (2):237-239.score: 120.0
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  33. Harry G. Frankfurt (2006). Taking Ourselves Seriously & Getting It Right. Stanford University Press.score: 81.0
    Harry G. Frankfurt begins his inquiry by asking, “What is it about human beings that makes it possible for us to take ourselves seriously?” Based on The Tanner Lectures in Moral Philosophy, Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right delves into this provocative and original question. The author maintains that taking ourselves seriously presupposes an inward-directed, reflexive oversight that enables us to focus our attention directly upon ourselves, and “[it] means that we are not prepared to accept ourselves just as (...)
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  34. Johannes Giesinger (2011). Education, Fair Competition, and Concern for the Worst Off. Educational Theory 61 (1):41-54.score: 24.0
    In this essay, Johannes Giesinger comments on the current philosophical debate on educational justice. He observes that while authors like Elizabeth Anderson and Debra Satz develop a so-called adequacy view of educational justice, Harry Brighouse and Adam Swift defend an egalitarian principle. Giesinger focuses his analysis on the main objection that is formulated, from an egalitarian perspective, against the adequacy view: that it neglects the problem of securing fair opportunities in the competition for social rewards. Giesinger meets this (...)
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  35. Hallie Liberto (2013). Noxious Markets Versus Noxious Gift Relationships. Social Theory and Practice 39 (2):265-287.score: 24.0
    I argue that women in traditional marriages are a vulnerable source for kidneys and this vulnerability gives rise to exploitative donation arrangements made within families. In so doing, I critique Alan Wertheimer’s account of the impact that emotional closeness between participants in an agreement has on the wrongfulness of exploitation. I propose a regulated market scheme that is not only less exploitative than our current donation scheme, but also resolves a variety of other moral problems that typically arise in real (...)
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  36. André Robinet (1976). Leibniz und Heidegger: Atomzeitalter oder Informatikzeitalter? Studia Leibnitiana 8 (2):241 - 256.score: 24.0
    On trouve dans l'ouvrage de M. Heidegger, Der Satz vom Grund, une structure essentielle d'opposition entre «compter» et «méditer». Cette opposition prend son origine dans la dualité des interprétations du principe de raison, selon qu'on l' accentue dans le sens du nombre ou dans le sens de l'être. Contrairement à ce que soutient Heidegger, A. R. estime que l'interprétation du principe de raison selon Leibniz relève d'une troisième accentuation, qui exige la connivence du nombre et de l'être, et non (...)
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  37. Maria E. Reicher (1995). Gibt es unvollständige Gegenstände? Grazer Philosophische Studien 50:217-232.score: 24.0
    In Über Möglichkeit und Wahrscheinlichkeit entwickelt Meinong seine Theorie der unvollständigen Gegenstände. Der Begriff der Unvollständigkeit wird eingeführt mittels expliziter Bezugnahme auf den Satz vom ausgeschlossenen Dritten: Ein Gegenstand ist unvollständig genau dann, wenn für ihn der Satz vom ausgeschlossenen Dritten nicht gilt. M. a. W.: x ist unvollständig, wenn nicht für jede Eigenschaft P gilt, daß x P hat oder daß x P nicht hat. Alle existierenden und bestehenden Gegenstände sind vollständig; Gegenstände wie das Dreieck in abstracto (...)
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  38. Andrés Bobenrieth M. (2011). The Origins of the Use of the Argument of Trivialization in the Twentieth Century. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (2):111-121.score: 12.0
    The origin of paraconsistent logic is closely related with the argument, 'from the assertion of two mutually contradictory statements any other statement can be deduced'; this can be referred to as ex contradictione sequitur quodlibet (ECSQ). Despite its medieval origin, only by the 1930s did it become the main reason for the unfeasibility of having contradictions in a deductive system. The purpose of this article is to study what happened earlier: from Principia Mathematica to that time, when it became well (...)
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  39. D. M. Jones (1953). David Tabachovitz: Homerische ε -Sätze. Eine sprachpsychologische Studie. (Skrifter utgivna av Svenska Institutet i Athen, 8°, III.) Pp. 156. Lund: Gleerup, 1951. Paper, Kr. 20. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 3 (3-4):194-195.score: 12.0
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  40. Klaus Jürgen Düsberg (1979). Sind Empirische Theorien Falsifizierbar? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 10 (1):11-27.score: 8.0
    Die Frage: sind empirische Theorien falsifizierbar? ist natürlich trivialerweise zu verneinen, falls man Theorien nicht als Mengen von Aussagen, sonden z. B., wie Sneed/Stegmüller, als mengentheoretische Strukturen plus intendierte Anwendungsbereiche auffaßt. Daß die Antwort, zumindest dann, wenn man die Fragestellung auf bestimmte physikalische Theorien einschränkt, auch bei Zugrundelegung der sogenannten Aussagen-Konzeption (statement view) nicht anders lautet, ist hingegen schon weniger trivial — obgleich seit langem bekannt, spätestens nämlich seit Duhems berühmter Argumentation gegen die Möglichkeit eines experimentum crucis. Andererseits beruht eine (...)
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