Search results for 'Decadence in art' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Charles Bernheimer (2002). Decadent Subjects: The Idea of Decadence in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Culture of the Fin De Siècle in Europe. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 711.0
    Charles Bernheimer described decadence as a "stimulant that bends thought out of shape, deforming traditional conceptual molds." In this posthumously published work, Bernheimer succeeds in making a critical concept out of this perennially fashionable, rarely understood term. Decadent Subjects is a coherent and moving picture of fin de siècle decadence. Mature, ironic, iconoclastic, and thoughtful, this remarkable collection of essays shows the contradictions of the phenomenon, which is both a condition and a state of mind. In seeking to (...)
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  2. Oliver Conolly (2004). Decadent Subjects: The Idea of Decadence in Art, Literature, Philosophy and Culture of the Fin de Siècle in Europe. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):199-202.score: 450.0
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  3. Frederik le Roy (ed.) (2011). Tickle Your Catastrophe!: Imagining Catastrophe in Art, Architecture and Philosophy. Academia Press.score: 224.0
    A collection of essays that takes stock of the current impact of the image and imagination of the catastrophe in art, science and philosophy.
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  4. Eric R. Kandel (2011). The Age of Insight: The Quest to Understand the Unconscious in Art, Mind, and Brain: From Vienna 1900 to the Present. Random House.score: 224.0
    A psychoanalytic psychology and art of unconscious emotion -- An inward turn : Vienna 1900 -- Exploring the truths hidden beneath the surface : origins of a scientific medicine -- Viennese artists, writers, and scientists meet in the Zuckerkandl Salon -- Exploring the brain beneath the skull : origins of a scientific psychiatry -- Exploring mind together with the brain : the development of a brain-based psychology -- Exploring mind apart from the brain : origins of a dynamic psychology -- (...)
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  5. Mary Sanders Pollock & Catherine Rainwater (eds.) (2005). Figuring Animals: Essays on Animal Images in Art, Literature, Philosophy, and Popular Culture. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 220.0
    Figuring Animals is a collection of fifteen essays concerning the representation of animals in literature, the visual arts, philosophy, and cultural practice. At the turn of the new century, it is helpful to reconsider our inherited understandings of the species, some of which are still useful to us. It is also important to look ahead to new understandings and new dialogue, which may contribute to the survival of us all. The contributors to this volume participate in this dialogue in a (...)
     
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  6. Daya Krishna (1989). The Art of the Conceptual: Explorations in a Conceptual Maze Over Three Decades. Indian Council of Philosophical Research in Association with Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.score: 215.0
     
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  7. Meredith Tromble (2009). The Advent of Chemical Symbolism in the Art of Sonya Rapoport. Foundations of Chemistry 11 (1):51-60.score: 199.0
    This paper explores the use of chemical symbolism in works by the new media artist Sonya Rapoport, with a focus on the pivotal Cobalt series from the late 1970s. These works, drawings on computer printouts generated by research at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, respond to experiments in nuclear chemistry. They mark the beginning of three productive decades in which Rapoport produced a variety of images related to chemistry in her work. She states, “I looked for authentic research projects that were (...)
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  8. Iain Boyd Whyte (ed.) (2010). Beyond the Finite: The Sublime in Art and Science. Oxford University Press.score: 196.0
    Science is continually faced with describing that which is beyond. This book, through contributions from nine prominent scholars, tackles that challenge.
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  9. Herta Pauly (1973). Aesthetic Decadence Today Viewed in Terms of Schiller's Three Impulses. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (3):365-373.score: 189.0
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  10. C. E. Emmer (2008). Crowther and the Kantian Sublime in Art. In Valerio Rohden, Ricardo R. Terra & Guido A. de Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants: Akten des X. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses [Right and Peace in Kant's Philosophy: Proceedings of the 10th International Kant Congress] 5 vols. Walter de Gruyter.score: 186.0
    Paul Crowther, in his book, The Kantian Sublime (1989), works to reconstruct Kant's aesthetics in order to make its continued relevance to contemporary aesthetic concerns more visible. The present article remains within the area of Crowther's "cognitive" sublime, to show that there is much space for expanding upon Kantian varieties of the sublime, particularly in art.
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  11. Edward Segel & Lera Boroditsky (2011). Grammar in Art. Frontiers in Psychology 1.score: 186.0
    Roman Jakobson (1959) reports: “The Russian painter Repin was baffled as to why Sin had been depicted as a woman by German artists: he did not realize that “sin” is feminine in German (die Sünde), but masculine in Russian (грех).” Does the grammatical gender of nouns in an artist’s native language indeed predict the gender of personifications in art? In this paper we analyzed works in the ARTstor database (a digital art library containing over a million images) to measure this (...)
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  12. Hélène Guiraud (1997). I Claudia. Women in Ancient Rome, éd. Diana E. E. Kleiner et Susan B. Matheson, Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, 1996, 228 p. [REVIEW] Clio 2:31-31.score: 183.0
    L'ouvrage regroupe plusieurs chapitres et les notices et photographies de 170 statues et objets présentés lors de trois expositions dans des musées américains, à Yale en 1996, San Antonio et Raleigh en 1997. Après un premier chapitre sur le « genre » (Gender theory in roman art, N.B. Kampen), concept moderne, fruit de plusieurs décades de travail sur la théorie féministe, qui est un chapitre de réflexions sur l'organisation sociale hiérarchisée, fondée sur les différences sexuelles, ..
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  13. Margaret A. Nash (2013). Cultivating Our “Musical Bumps” While Fighting the “Progress of Popery”: The Rise of Art and Music Education in the Mid-Nineteenth Century United States. Educational Studies 49 (3):193-212.score: 183.0
    This article seeks to understand the social and cultural factors that led to the introduction of music and art education in public schools, a process that began in the middle decades of the nineteenth century. Based on archival material, including institutional catalogues, school board reports, magazine articles, and tracts, I demonstrate that music and art held varied meanings in this period, one of the most important of which was denominational competition. One major element in a nationwide promotion of the arts (...)
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  14. George C. Schuetze (2005). Convergences in Music and Art: A Bibliographic Study. Harmonie Park Press.score: 182.0
    Artists inspired by music and musicians -- Composers inspired by art and artists -- Twin talents : artist-musicians and musician-artists -- Musicians pose for the artists : a history of portrait iconography.
     
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  15. Gavin Keeney (2011). &Quot;else-Where&Quot;: Essays in Art, Architecture, and Cultural Production 2002-2011. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.score: 180.0
    “Else-where” is a synoptic survey of the representational values given to art, architecture, and cultural production from 2002 through 2011. Written primarily as a critique of what is suppressed in architecture and what is disclosed in art, the essays are informed by the passage out of post-structuralism and its disciplinary analogues toward the real Real (denoted over the course of the studies as the “Real-Irreal” or “Else-where”). While architecture nominally addresses an environmental ethos, it also famously negotiates its own representational (...)
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  16. Matthew Lipman (1967/1966). What Happens in Art. New York, Appleton-Century-Crofts.score: 180.0
    Subsequently presented is a more detailed consideration of the notion of process , for we cannot understand what happens in art as a process unless we are ...
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  17. Kuisma Korhonen & Pajari Räsänen (eds.) (2010). The Event of Encounter in Art and Philosophy: Continental Perspectives. Gaudeamus.score: 180.0
     
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  18. James A. Leith & George Whalley (eds.) (1987). Symbols in Life and Art: The Royal Society of Canada Symposium in Memory of George Whalley. Published for the Royal Society of Canada by Mcgill-Queen's University Press.score: 176.0
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  19. Frances S. Connelly (2012). The Grotesque in Western Art and Culture: The Image at Play. Cambridge University Press.score: 176.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction: entering the Spielraum; 2. Improvisation I: grottesche; 3. Improvisation II: arabesques; 4. Subversion: the carnivalesque body; 5. Trauma: the failure of representation; 6. Revelation: profound play.
     
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  20. Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy (1995). The Transformation of Nature in Art. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd..score: 176.0
    The theory of art in Asia.--Meister Eckhart's view of art.--Reactions to art in India.--Aesthetic of the Śukranītsāra.--Paroksa.--Ábhása.--Origin and use of images in India.--Notes.--Sanskrit glossary.--List of Chinese characters.--Bibliography (p. [235]-245).
     
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  21. Tere Vadén (2003). Rock the Boat: Localized Ethics, the Situated Self, and Particularism in Contemporary Art. Salon.score: 176.0
     
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  22. Herman Rapaport (1997). Is There Truth in Art? Cornell University Press.score: 168.0
    'Is There Truth in Art?' includes chapters on atonal music, environmental art, modern German and French poetry, contemporary French fiction, experimental French ...
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  23. John Beloff (1970). Creative Thinking in Art and in Science. British Journal of Aesthetics 10 (1):58-70.score: 168.0
    Two questions are examined (a) the differences between creative and uncreative individuals and (b) the differences between artists and scientists. It is concluded that while divergent thinking is a necessary feature of the creative process alike in art and in science the scientific intellect exemplifies more the convergent type. Contrary to what most authorities have said it is here argued that creativity depends more upon the presence of a certain inborn flair than upon personality dynamics.
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  24. Katherine Thomson (2002). Aesthetic and Ethical Mediocrity in Art. Philosophical Papers 31 (2):199-215.score: 168.0
    Abstract In this paper I suggest a way that an already promising view on ethical art criticism can account for the value of mediocre artworks which endorse morally commendable perspectives. In order for the view I call prescriptive ethicism to deal with such cases of critical ambivalence, it must take account of the interaction between moral content and form in art. Such interaction is seen in the way the aesthetic features of an artwork partly determine its moral value, or success (...)
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  25. Michael H. Mitias (ed.) (1985). Creativity in Art, Religion, and Culture. Distributed in the U.S.A. By Humanities Press.score: 168.0
    PREFACE It became clear to me in the past few years that any human quest or endeavor — whether it is in art, religion, business, politics, science, ...
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  26. Walter Carnielli (2004). Book Reviews: Claude P. Bruter (Editor), Mathematics in Art: Mathematical Visualization in Art and Education. Logic and Logical Philosophy 13:163-166.score: 168.0
    Claude P. Bruter (editor), Mathematics in Art: Mathematical Visualization inArt and Education, Springer Verlag, New York, 2002, pp. X + 337, ISBN 3-540-43422-4.
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  27. Marcia Landy (2003). Traveling in Film Theory, on Giuliana Bruno Atlas of Emotion: Journeys in Art, Architecture, and Film. Film-Philosophy 7 (6).score: 168.0
    Giuliana Bruno _Atlas of Emotion: Journeys in Art, Architecture, and Film_ London: Verso, 2002 ISBN 1859848028 484 pp.
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  28. Kristina Niedderer & Linden Reilly (2011). Research Practice in Art and Design: Experiential Knowledge and Organised Inquiry. Journal of Research Practice 6 (2):Article E2.score: 168.0
    Experiential knowledge is not often associated with research and organized inquiry, and even less often with the rigour of debating and honing research methods and methodology. However, many researchers in art and design and related fields perceive experiential knowledge or tacit knowledge as an integral part of their practice. The editorial article for the special issue on "Research Practice in Art and Design: Experiential Knowledge and Organised Inquiry" explores how research can recognise the relationship between creative practice, experience, and knowledge (...)
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  29. Matthew Kieran (2010). The Vice of Snobbery: Aesthetic Knowledge, Justification and Virtue in Art Appreciation. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):243-263.score: 164.0
    Apparently snobbery undermines justification for and legitimacy of aesthetic claims. It is also pervasive in the aesthetic realm, much more so than we tend to presume. If these two claims are combined, a fundamental problem arises: we do not know whether or not we are justified in believing or making aesthetic claims. Addressing this new challenge requires an epistemological story which underpins when, where and why snobbish judgement is problematic, and how appreciative claims can survive. This leads towards a virtue-theoretic (...)
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  30. Stephen Snyder (2010). Arthur Danto’s Andy Warhol: The Embodiment of Theory in Art and the Pragmatic Turn. Leitmotiv:135-151.score: 164.0
    Arthur Danto’s recent book, Andy Warhol, leads the reader through the story of the iconic American’s artistic life highlighted by a philosophical commentary, a commentary that merges Danto’s aesthetic theory with the artist himself. Inspired by Warhol’s Brillo Box installation, art that in Danto’s eyes was indiscernible from the everyday boxes it represented, Danto developed a theory that is able to differentiate art from non-art by employing the body of conceptual art theory manifest in what he termed the ‘artworld’. The (...)
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  31. Haig Khatchadourian (1977). The Creative Process in Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 17 (3):230-241.score: 164.0
    The article maintains, By appeal to documentary evidence relating to the creative processes of various artists, That the two major rival theories of the creative process--The "teleological" and the "propulsive" ("non-Teleological") theories--Are inadequate. Rather than always being goal-Directed or always propulsive, Creative processes exhibit a wide range of patterns. Six of them are considered. They range from works "which have been created without any, Or with scarcely any, (1) "vision" of the work-To-Be created, Even of the vaguest or most general (...)
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  32. Martin Lefebvre (2007). Peirce's Esthetics: A Taste for Signs in Art. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (2):319-344.score: 164.0
    : Is Peirce's esthetic relevant for the philosophy of art—what is usually referred to today as aesthetics? At first glance Peirce's idiosyncratic esthetic seems quite unconcerned with issues of art. Yet a careful examination reveals that this is not the case. Thus, rather than attempt to "apply" Peirce's views to some aspect of the practice or the theory of art (e.g., creativity, historiography of art, style, genre), or even to a particular work of art, my intention is to examine how (...)
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  33. Wilfried van Damme (2010). Ernst Grosse and the "Ethnological Method" in Art Theory. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):302-312.score: 164.0
    Why are the Germans good at music, whereas the Dutch excel in painting? What are the reasons for the outstanding draftsmanship of Australian Aboriginals, and why does this skill seem absent among West African peoples, who appear concerned rather with sculpture? Could it be that the Japanese do not share the European preference for symmetry in decorative art? Moreover, why do tastes in the visual arts, music, and literature change so noticeably throughout history? Is it possible that, despite differences across (...)
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  34. Olga Hubard (2011). Rethinking Critical Thinking and its Role in Art Museum Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (3):15-21.score: 164.0
    Meaningful interactions with works of art are often absent from education. Across the country, art museums are intent on changing this situation. But to incorporate art viewing1 into an educational milieu that does not value art, art museum educators are constantly forced to justify the educational value of their programs. One common argument to substantiate the worth of art viewing is that it promotes critical thinking. In fact, several museums across the United States assert that the goal of their education (...)
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  35. Fernando A. Valenzuela (2013). Naivety as a form of social classification in art: a sociological analysis. Cinta de Moebio 48:136-146.score: 164.0
    The notion of naivety is a form of classification and explanation of the social world. By applying Erving Goffman’s expression games model, it is observed that the notion of naivety corresponds to a situation in which an observer assumes that the observed subject does not accommodate his behavior to the presence of the observer, in the assumption that the latter might take advantage from what he learns from it. This article explores this model’s explanatory power in reference to the diverse (...)
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  36. Roman Frigg & Matthew Hunter (eds.) (2010). Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science. Boston Studies in Philosophy of Science.score: 164.0
    Featuring contributions from leading experts, this book represents the first collection of essays on the topic of art and science in the analytic tradition of ...
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  37. Marion Vorms, Book Review: R. Frigg & M. C. Hunter, Eds. 2010. Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science. Dordrecht: Springer. [REVIEW]score: 164.0
    The book edited by Roman Frigg and Matthew C. Hunter is a great example of interdisciplinary collaborative work, bringing together contributions by scholars of science and of art, around the topic of representation. The collection consists of eleven essays, seven of which were presented in early form at a conference organized by the two editors at the London School of Economics and the Courtauld Institute of Art in June 2006; the other four have been added subsequently. The result is a (...)
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  38. Eleni Gemtou (2009). Analogies, Metaphors and Models in Art and Science. Philosophical Inquiry 31 (3-4):51-64.score: 164.0
    Analogy, as the connection of similar things, is present in all fields of human thought. Art uses verbal (in poetry, literature, art criticism) and optical analogies(in the visual arts), aiming at an emotional perception and interpretation of the world. Philosophy and the sciences also use largely analogical applications, as ameans to construct intuitionally understandable theories. In Law the analogical application of laws is an efficient way to regulate social conflicts. The risk,however, of cognitive distortions, by transferring inadequately explanatory models to (...)
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  39. Nelson Goodman & Menachem Brinker (1983). Representation and Realism in Art: A Debate (in Hebrew). Iyyun 32:216-222.score: 164.0
    These two short essays are a hebrew translation of an exchange that followed the publication of "verisimilitude, conventions and beliefs" by menachem brinker which contained a criticism of nelson goodman's theory of representation and realism in "languages of art" (1969). (edited).
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  40. Glenn Parsons & Allen Carlson (2013). Distinguishing Intention and Function in Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):153 - 154.score: 164.0
    We applaud Bullot & Reber's (B&R's) attempt to encompass the function of artworks within their psycho-historical model of art appreciation. However, we suggest that in order to fully realize this aim, they require a clearer distinction between an artist's intentions toward an artwork and its proper functions. We also show how such a distinction improves the internal coherence of their model.
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  41. Alex Schulman (2006). PurgePolitik: The Political Functions of Decadence in Fascism. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 8 (1):5-34.score: 164.0
    This paper seeks to add a new facet to the definition (s) of fascism, that amorphous social, cultural, political, and aesthetic conception that has inspired no small degree of controversy over the years since the defeat of the Nazis—indeed, even since the ascension of Mussolini. I argue that the conception of “decadence” by ruling or vanguard party circles, and the expression of a need for such decadence to be purged for the health of the society, is a central (...)
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  42. Shigeko Takahashi & Yoshimichi Ejima (2013). Contextual Information Processing of Brain in Art Appreciation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (2):158-159.score: 164.0
    A psycho-historical framework for the science of art appreciation will be an experimental discipline that may shed new light on the highest capacities of the human brain, yielding new scientific ways to talk about the art appreciation. The recent findings of the contextual information processing in the human brain make the concept of the art-historical context clear for empirical experimentation.
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  43. Stephen Mumford & Teresa Lacerda (2010). The Genius in Art and in Sport: A Contribution to the Investigation of Aesthetics of Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 37 (2):182-193.score: 164.0
    This paper contains a consideration of the notion of genius and its significance to the discussion of the aesthetics of sport. We argue that genius can make a positive aes- thetic contribution in both art and sport, just as some have argued that the moral content of a work of art can affect its aesthetic value. A genius is an exceptional inno- vator of successful strategies, where such originality adds aesthetic value. We argue that an original painting can have greater (...)
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  44. Seymour Roworth-Stokes (2013). The Business of Research in Art and Design: Parallels Between Research Centres and Small Businesses. Journal of Research Practice 9 (1):Article M3.score: 164.0
    This article provides a cross-case analysis of four art and design research centres operating within UK universities. Findings from autobiographical and semi-structured interviews with researchers, research managers, and research leaders indicate that they encounter similar issues in trying to establish internal legitimacy within the university alongside the need to gain external support and recognition. In dealing with these challenges, art and design research centres tend to pass through four broadly identifiable phases: (i) Origination (utilising credentials and leadership capacity), (ii) Establishment (...)
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  45. Charles Biederman & David Bohm (1999). Bohm-Biederman Correspondence: Creativity in Art and Science. Routledge.score: 164.0
    "It was sheer chance that I encountered David Bohm's writing in 1958 ... I knew nothing about him. What struck me about his work and prompted my initial letter was his underlying effort to seek for some larger sense of reality, which seemed a very humanized search." - Charles Biederman, from the foreword of the book This book marks the beginning of a four thousand page correspondence between Charles Biederman, founder of Constructivism in the 1930s, and David Bohm the prestigious (...)
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  46. Douglas Lackey (1988). Modes of Individuation in Art. Philosophy Research Archives 14:567-580.score: 164.0
    Philosophers have developed various systems of individuation for handling questions of identity regarding works of art. But even a casual survey of different arts reveals that questions of individuation in one art form are markedly different from questions of individuation in another. Though distinctively philosophical concepts can go a short way in clarifying these issues, it is hardly likely that any single philosophical system can do justice to them all.
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  47. Carl Senior & Nick Lee (2013). The State of the Art in Organizational Cognitive Neuroscience: The Therapeutic Gap and Possible Implications for Clinical Practice. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:808.score: 163.0
    In the last decade, researchers in the social sciences have increasingly adopted neuroscientific techniques, with the consequent rise of research inspired by neuroscience in disciplines such as economics, marketing, decision sciences, and leadership. In 2007, we introduced the term organizational cognitive neuroscience (OCN), in an attempt to clearly demarcate research carried out in these many areas, and provide an overarching paradigm for research utilising cognitive neuroscientific methods, theories, and concepts, within the organizational and business research fields. Here we will revisit (...)
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  48. Alison Ross (2008). 'Art' in Nancy's 'First Philosophy': The Artwork and the Praxis of Sense Making. Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):18-40.score: 162.0
    For the purposes of analytical clarity it is possible to distinguish two ways in which Nancy's ontology of sense appeals to art. First, he uses 'art' as a metaphorical operator to give features to his ontology (such as surprise and wonder); second, the practice of the contemporary arts instruct the terms of his ontological project because, in his view, this practice catches up with the fragmentation of existence and thus informs ontology about the structure of existence today. These two different (...)
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  49. Daniel L. Tate (2012). In the Fullness of Time: Gadamer on the Temporal Dimension of the Work of Art. Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):92-113.score: 162.0
    Abstract In Gadamer's later writings on art, his investigation into the being of the work exploits the temporal resonance of the concept of performative enactment ( Vollzug ), which displaces the priority of play ( Spiel ) in his earlier account. Drawing upon Heidegger, Gadamer deploys the concepts of tarrying ( Verweilen ) and the while ( die Weile ) to elucidate the temporality of the work of art as an event of being. On the one hand, tarrying describes the (...)
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  50. Berys Nigel Gaut & Paisley Livingston (eds.) (2003). The Creation of Art: New Essays in Philosophical Aesthetics. Cambridge University Press.score: 160.0
    Although creativity, from Plato onwards, has been recognized as a topic in philosophy, it has been overshadowed by investigations of the meanings and values of works of art. In this new collection of essays a distinguished roster of philosophers of art redress this trend. The subjects discussed include the nature of creativity and the process of artistic creation; the role that creative making should play in our understanding and evaluation of art; relations between concepts of creation and creativity; and ideas (...)
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