Search results for 'Decision making Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Decision Making (2012). S Hared Decision Making is Widely Accepted as an Ethical Imperative1–5 and as an Important Part of Reasoned Clinical Practice. 6 Major Texts in Decision Analysis, 7 Medical Ethics, 8 and Evidence-Based Medicine9 All Encourage Physicians to Include Patients in the Decision-Making Process. [REVIEW] In Stephen Holland (ed.), Arguing About Bioethics. Routledge. 346.score: 966.0
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  2. Iva Smit, Wendell Wallach & G. E. Lasker (eds.) (2005). Cognitive, Emotive, and Ethical Aspects of Decision Making in Humans and in Ai. International Institute for Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics.score: 301.2
  3. Rafael Morales-Sánchez & Carmen Cabello-Medina (2013). The Role of Four Universal Moral Competencies in Ethical Decision-Making. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (4):717-734.score: 297.2
    Current frameworks on ethical decision-making process have some limitations. This paper argues that the consideration of moral competencies, understood as moral virtues in the workplace, can enhance our understanding of why moral character contributes to ethical decision-making. After discussing the universal nature of four moral competencies (prudence, justice, fortitude and temperance), we analyse their influence on the various stages of the ethical decision-making process. We conclude by considering (...)
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  4. Maureen Miner & Agnes Petocz (2003). Moral Theory in Ethical Decision Making: Problems, Clarifications and Recommendations From a Psychological Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 42 (1):11 - 25.score: 296.8
    Psychological theory and research in ethical decision making and ethical professional practice are presently hampered by a failure to take appropriate account of an extensive background in moral philosophy. As a result, attempts to develop models of ethical decision making are left vulnerable to a number of criticisms: that they neglect the problems of meta-ethics and the variety of meta-ethical perspectives; that they fail clearly and consistently to differentiate between descriptive and (...)
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  5. Jaana Woiceshyn (2011). A Model for Ethical Decision Making in Business: Reasoning, Intuition, and Rational Moral Principles. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (3):311-323.score: 296.2
    How do business leaders make ethical decisions? Given the significant and wide-spread impact of business people’s decisions on multiple constituents (e.g., customers, employees, shareholders, competitors, and suppliers), how they make decisions matters. Unethical decisions harm the decision makers themselves as well as others, whereas ethical decisions have the opposite effect. Based on data from a study on strategic decision making by 16 effective chief executive officers (and three not-so-effective ones as contrast), I propose a model (...)
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  6. Greg E. Loviscky, Linda K. Treviño & Rick R. Jacobs (2007). Assessing Managers' Ethical Decision-Making: An Objective Measure of Managerial Moral Judgment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (3):263 - 285.score: 296.2
    Recent allegations of unethical decision-making by leaders in prominent business organizations have jeopardized the world’s confidence in American business. The purpose of this research was to develop a measure of managerial moral judgment that can be used in future research and managerial assessment. The measure was patterned after the Defining Issues Test, a widely used general measure of moral judgment. With content validity as the goal, we aimed to sample the domain of managerial ethical situations (...)
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  7. Neal M. Ashkanasy, Carolyn A. Windsor & Linda K. Treviño (2006). Bad Apples in Bad Barrels Revisited: Cognitive Moral Development, Just World Beliefs, Rewards, and Ethical Decision-Making. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (4):449-474.score: 268.2
    Abstract: In this study, we test the interactive effect on ethical decision-making of (1) personal characteristics, and (2) personal expectancies based on perceptions of organizational rewards and punishments. Personal characteristics studied were cognitive moral development and belief in a just world. Using an in-basket simulation, we found that exposure to reward system information influenced managers’ outcome expectancies. Further, outcome expectancies and belief in a just world interacted with managers’ cognitive moral development to influence managers’ (...) decision-making. In particular, low-cognitive moral development managers who expected that their organization condoned unethical behavior made less ethical decisions while high cognitive moral development managers became more ethical in this environment. Low cognitive moral development managers also behaved less ethically when their belief in a just world was high. (shrink)
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  8. Sara T. Fry (2008). Ethics in Nursing Practice: A Guide to Ethical Decision Making. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 265.2
    Every day nurses are required to make ethical decisions in the course of caring for their patients. Ethics in Nursing Practice provides the background necessary to understand ethical decision making and its implications for patient care. The authors focus on the individual nurse’s responsibilities, as well as considering the wider issues affecting patients, colleagues and society as a whole. This third edition is fully updated, and takes into account recent changes in ICN position statements, WHO documents, (...)
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  9. Bryan W. Husted & David B. Allen (2008). Toward a Model of Cross-Cultural Business Ethics: The Impact of Individualism and Collectivism on the Ethical Decision-Making Process. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (2):293 - 305.score: 261.4
    In this paper, we explore the impact of individualism and collectivism on three basic aspects of ethical decision making - the perception of moral problems, moral reasoning, and behavior. We argue that the inclusion of business practices within the moral domain by the individual depends partly upon individualism and collectivism. We also propose a pluralistic approach to post-conventional moral judgment that includes developmental paths appropriate for individualist and collectivist cultures. Finally, we argue (...)
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  10. Joan Poliner Shapiro (2001). Ethical Leadership and Decision Making in Education: Applying Theoretical Perspectives to Complex Dilemmas. L. Erlbaum Associates.score: 249.0
    The authors developed this textbook in response to an increasing interest in ethics, and a growing number of courses on this topic that are now being offered in educational leadership programs. It is designed to fill a gap in instructional materials for teaching the ethics component of the knowledge base that has been established for the profession. The text has several purposes: First, it demonstrates the application of different ethical paradigms (the ethics of justice, care, critique, and the profession) (...)
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  11. Mary E. Guy (1990). Ethical Decision Making in Everyday Work Situations. Quorum Books.score: 239.2
    This book takes a new approach to ethics by focusing on the kinds of dilemmas that confront people almost daily on the job.
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  12. Leslie C. Levin & Lynn M. Mather (eds.) (2012). Lawyers in Practice: Ethical Decision Making in Context. The University of Chicago Press.score: 238.2
    Timely and practical, this book should be required reading for law students as well as students and scholars of law and society.
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  13. Andrew West (2008). Sartrean Existentialism and Ethical Decision-Making in Business. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (1):15 - 25.score: 234.4
    A wide range of decision-making models have been offered to assist in making ethical decisions in the workplace. Those that are based on normative moral frameworks typically include elements of traditional moral philosophy such as consequentialist and/or deontological␣ethics. This paper suggests an alternative model drawing on Jean-Paul Sartre’s existentialism. Accordingly, the model focuses on making decisions in full awareness of one’s freedom and responsibility. The steps of the model are intended to encourage reflection (...)
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  14. Jennifer Mencl & Douglas R. May (2009). The Effects of Proximity and Empathy on Ethical Decision-Making: An Exploratory Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):201 - 226.score: 233.2
    The goals of this research were to (1) explore the direct effects of and interactions between magnitude of consequences and various types of proximity - social, psychological, and physical - on the ethical decision-making process and (2) investigate the influence of empathy on the ethical decision-making process. A carpal tunnel syndrome vignette and questionnaire were administered to a sample of human resource management professionals to test the hypothesized relationships. Significant relationships were found for the (...)
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  15. Sefa Hayibor & David M. Wasieleski (2009). Effects of the Use of the Availability Heuristic on Ethical Decision-Making in Organizations. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (1):151 - 165.score: 233.2
    Recent corporate scandals across various industries have led to an increased focus on research in business ethics, particularly on understanding ethical decision-making. This increased interest is due largely to managers' desire to reduce the incidence of unwanted behaviors in the workplace. This article examines one major moderator of the ethical decision-making process - moral intensity. In particular, we explore the potential influence of a particular cognitive heuristic - the availability heuristic -on perceptions of (...)
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  16. Nicki Marquardt & Rainer Hoeger (2009). The Effect of Implicit Moral Attitudes on Managerial Decision-Making: An Implicit Social Cognition Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 85 (2):157 - 171.score: 233.2
    This article concerns itself with the relationship between implicit moral cognitions and decisions in the realm of business ethics. Traditionally, business ethics research emphasized the effects of overt or explicit attitudes on ethical decision-making and neglected intuitive or implicit attitudes. Therefore, based on an implicit social cognition approach it is important to know whether implicit moral attitudes may have a substantial impact on managerial ethical decision-making processes. To test this thesis, a study (...)
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  17. Jana L. Craft (2013). A Review of the Empirical Ethical Decision-Making Literature: 2004–2011. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (2):221-259.score: 233.2
    This review summarizes the research on ethical decision-making from 2004 to 2011. Eighty-four articles were published during this period, resulting in 357 findings. Individual findings are categorized by their application to individual variables, organizational variables, or the concept of moral intensity as developed by Jones (Acad Manag Rev 16(2):366–395, 1991). Rest’s (Moral development: advances in research and theory, Praeger, New York, 1986) four-step model for ethical decision-making is used to summarize findings by (...)
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  18. Nicole E. Ruedy & Maurice E. Schweitzer (2010). In the Moment: The Effect of Mindfulness on Ethical Decision Making. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (1):73 - 87.score: 233.2
    Many unethical decisions stem from a lack of awareness. In this article, we consider how mindfulness, an individual's awareness of his or her present experience, impacts ethical decision making. In our first study, we demonstrate that compared to individuals low in mindfulness, individuals high in mindfulness report that they are more likely to act ethically, are more likely to value upholding ethical standards (self-importance of moral identity, SMI), and are more likely to use a principled (...)
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  19. Connie R. Bateman, Sean Valentine & Terri Rittenburg (2013). Ethical Decision Making in a Peer-to-Peer File Sharing Situation: The Role of Moral Absolutes and Social Consensus. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (2):229-240.score: 222.4
    Individuals are downloading copyrighted materials at escalating rates (Hill 2007; Siwek 2007). Since most materials shared within these networks are copyrighted works, providing, exchanging, or downloading files is considered to be piracy and a violation of intellectual property rights (Shang et al. 2008). Previous research indicates that personal moral philosophies rooted in moral absolutism together with social context may impact decision making in ethical dilemmas; however, it is yet unclear which motivations and norms contextually impact (...)
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  20. Isaac Levi (1986). Hard Choices: Decision Making Under Unresolved Conflict. Cambridge University Press.score: 221.4
    In this book, Isaac Levi denies this assumption, arguing instead that agents often should choose without having balanced the competing values and that rationality does not require that an act be optimal, only that it be what Levi terms 'admissible'. He explains the consequences of denying this assumption, and develops a general approach to decision making under unresolved conflict. He investigates the phenomenon of conflicting values in several areas, in each of which he develops a framework for rational (...)
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  21. Linda M. Sama & Victoria Shoaf (2002). Ethics on the Web: Applying Moral Decision-Making to the New Media. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):93 - 103.score: 213.4
    This paper examines the advent of the Web as a critical media tool in the promotion and sale of goods to consumers and the ethical questions it raises that are issues of public policy. We examine four traditional ethical rationales that guide organizational decision-making – utilitarianism, distributive justice, moral rights of man and relativism, further characterized as "ends-based", "equity-based", "rules-based" and "comparison-based" rationales – and we apply them to four moral dilemmas attributed to (...)
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  22. Gian Luca Casali (2011). Developing a Multidimensional Scale for Ethical Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):485-497.score: 213.4
    This article reports on the development of the managerial ethical profile (MEP) scale. The MEP scale is a multilevel, self-reporting scale measuring the perceived influence that different dimensions of common ethical frameworks have on managerial decision making. The MEP scale measures on eight subscales: economic egoism, reputational egoism, act utilitarianism, rule utilitarianism, self-virtue of self, virtue of others, act deontology, and rule deontology. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to provide evidence of scale validity. Future research (...)
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  23. Kleio Akrivou, Dimitrios Bourantas, Shenjiang Mo & Evi Papalois (2011). The Sound of Silence – A Space for Morality? The Role of Solitude for Ethical Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 102 (1):119-133.score: 212.2
    Building on research and measures on solitude, ethical leadership theories, and decision making literatures, we propose a conceptual model to better understand processes enabling ethical leadership neglected in the literature. The role of solitude as antecedent is explored in this model, whereby its selective utilization focuses inner directionality toward growing authentic executive awareness as a moral person and a moral manager and allows an integration between inner and outer directionality toward ethical leadership and (...)
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  24. Ted Lockhart (2000). Moral Uncertainty and its Consequences. Oxford University Press.score: 211.8
    We are often uncertain how to behave morally in complex situations. In this controversial study, Ted Lockhart contends that moral philosophy has failed to address how we make such moral decisions. Adapting decision theory to the task of decision-making under moral uncertainly, he proposes that we should not always act how we feel we ought to act, and that sometimes we should act against what we feel to be morally right. Lockhart also discusses abortion (...)
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  25. Wendell Wallach (2010). Robot Minds and Human Ethics: The Need for a Comprehensive Model of Moral Decision Making. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 12 (3):243-250.score: 211.0
    Building artificial moral agents (AMAs) underscores the fragmentary character of presently available models of human ethical behavior. It is a distinctly different enterprise from either the attempt by moral philosophers to illuminate the “ought” of ethics or the research by cognitive scientists directed at revealing the mechanisms that influence moral psychology, and yet it draws on both. Philosophers and cognitive scientists have tended to stress the importance of particular cognitive mechanisms, e.g., reasoning, moral sentiments, heuristics, (...)
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  26. Ronald R. Sims (1994). Ethics and Organizational Decision Making: A Call for Renewal. Quorum Books.score: 209.2
    The importance of institutionalizing ethics within an organization cannot be underestimated.
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  27. David Barr (2011). Ethics in Decision-Making. Institute of Business Ethics.score: 208.2
     
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  28. Marvin T. Brown (2000). Working Ethics: Strategies for Decision Making and Organizational Responsibility. Regent Press.score: 208.2
     
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  29. Connie Rae Bateman, John Paul Fraedrich & Rajesh Iyer (2002). Framing Effects Within the Ethical Decision Making Process of Consumers. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (1-2):119 - 140.score: 208.0
    There has been neglect of systematic conceptual development and empirical investigation within consumer ethics. Scenarios have been a long-standing tool yet their development has been haphazard with little theory guiding their development. This research answers four questions relative to this gap: Do different scenario decision frames encourage different moral reasoning styles? Does the way in which framing effects are measured make a difference in the measurement of the relationship between moral reasoning and judgment by gender? Are true (...)
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  30. A. Ben Oumlil & Joseph L. Balloun (2009). Ethical Decision-Making Differences Between American and Moroccan Managers. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):457 - 478.score: 205.2
    Our research’s aim is to assess the effect of cultural factors on business ethical decision-making process in a Western cultural context and in a non-Western cultural context. Specifically, this study investigates ethical perceptions, religiosity, personal moral philosophies, corporate ethical values, gender, and ethical intentions of U.S. and Moroccan business managers. The findings demonstrate that significant differences do exist between the two countries in idealism and relativism. Moroccan managers tend to be more idealistic than (...)
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  31. Johanna Kujala, Anna-Maija Lämsä & Katriina Penttilä (2011). Managers' Moral Decision-Making Patterns Over Time: A Multidimensional Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (2):191 - 207.score: 205.2
    Taking multidimensional ethics scale approach, this article describes an empirical survey of top managers' moral decision-making patterns and their change from 1994 to 2004 during morally problematic situations in the Finnish context. The survey questionnaire consisted of four moral dilemmas and a multidimensional scale with six ethical dimensions: justice, deontology, relativism, utilitarianism, egoism and female ethics. The managers evaluated their decision-making in the problems using the multidimensional ethics scale. Altogether 880 questionnaires were analysed (...)
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  32. Wendell Wallach, Stan Franklin & Colin Allen (2010). A Conceptual and Computational Model of Moral Decision Making in Human and Artificial Agents. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (3):454-485.score: 204.2
    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in general, comprehensive models of human cognition. Such models aim to explain higher-order cognitive faculties, such as deliberation and planning. Given a computational representation, the validity of these models can be tested in computer simulations such as software agents or embodied robots. The push to implement computational models of this kind has created the field of artificial general intelligence (AGI). Moral decision making is arguably one of the most challenging (...)
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  33. Kristin Zeiler, Lisa Guntram & Anette Lennerling (2010). Moral Tales of Parental Living Kidney Donation: A Parenthood Moral Imperative and its Relevance for Decision Making. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (3):225-236.score: 204.2
    Free and informed choice is an oft-acknowledged ethical basis for living kidney donation, including parental living kidney donation. The extent to which choice is present in parental living kidney donation has, however, been questioned. Since parents can be expected to have strong emotional bonds to their children, it has been asked whether these bonds make parents unable to say no to this donation. This article combines a narrative analysis of parents’ stories of living kidney donation with a philosophical discussion (...)
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  34. Hui-Ling Yang & Wei-Pang Wu (2009). The Effect of Moral Intensity on Ethical Decision Making in Accounting. Journal of Moral Education 38 (3):335-351.score: 199.8
    The purpose of this study was to examine the dimensionality of a moral intensity construct in four ethical accounting scenarios and how the dimensions directly affect the specific processes of moral decision making of accounting students. A survey was conducted with 233 accounting students enrolled in the school of accounting in a university of mainland China. Results indicated that the dimensions of moral intensity were significantly related to moral recognition, moral judgement and (...)
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  35. Joseph G. P. Paolillo & Scott J. Vitell (2002). An Empirical Investigation of the Influence of Selected Personal, Organizational and Moral Intensity Factors on Ethical Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 35 (1):65 - 74.score: 197.8
    This exploratory study of ethical decision making by individuals in organizations found moral intensity, as defined by Jones (1991), to significantly influence ethical decision making intentions of managers. Moral intensity explained 37% and 53% of the variance in ethical decision making in two decision-making scenarios. In part, the results of this research support our theoretical understanding of ethical/unethical decision-making and serve as a foundation for (...)
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  36. Marcus Selart & Svein Tvedt Johansen (2011). Ethical Decision Making in Organizations: The Role of Leadership Stress. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):129 - 143.score: 196.0
    Across two studies the hypotheses were tested that stressful situations affect both leadership ethical acting and leaders' recognition of ethical dilemmas. In the studies, decision makers recruited from 3 sites of a Swedish multinational civil engineering company provided personal data on stressful situations, made ethical decisions, and answered to stress-outcome questions. Stressful situations were observed to have a greater impact on ethical acting than on the recognition of ethical dilemmas. This was particularly true for (...)
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  37. Mark Coeckelbergh & Jessica Mesman (2007). With Hope and Imagination: Imaginative Moral Decision-Making in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):3 - 21.score: 195.2
    Although the role of imagination in moral reasoning is often neglected, recent literature, mostly of pragmatist signature, points to imagination as one of its central elements. In this article we develop some of their arguments by looking at the moral role of imagination in practice, in particular the practice of neonatal intensive care. Drawing on empirical research, we analyze a decision-making process in various stages: delivery, staff meeting, and reflection afterwards. We show how imagination aids medical (...)
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  38. D. Micah Hester (2010). End-of-Life Care and Pragmatic Decision Making: A Bioethical Perspective. Cambridge University Press.score: 195.0
    Crito revisited -- Blindness, narrative, and meaning : moral living -- Radical experience and tragic duty : moral dying -- Needing assistance to die well : PAS and beyond -- Experiencing lost voices : dying without capacity -- Dying young : what interests do children have? -- Caring for patients : cure, palliation, comfort, and aid in the process of dying.
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  39. H. Edward Everding (1975). Decision Making and the Bible. Judson Press.score: 193.2
     
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  40. Edward J. O'Boyle (2002). An Ethical Decision-Making Process for Computing Professionals. Ethics and Information Technology 4 (4):267-277.score: 192.4
    Our comments focus on the ACMCode of Ethics and situate the Code within ageneral ethical decision-making process tospecify the five steps which logically precedehuman action in ethical matters and determinethat action, and the individual differencetraits in these five steps which bear upon theresolution of an ethical problem and lead tomorally responsible action. Our main purpose isto present a cognitive moral processing modelwhich computing professionals can use to betterunderstand their professional rights andduties. It is clear (...)
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  41. Vidya N. Awasthi (2008). Managerial Decision-Making on Moral Issues and the Effects of Teaching Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 78 (1-2):207 - 223.score: 192.2
    This study uses judgment and decision-making (JDM) perspective with the help of framing and schema literature from cognitive psychology to evaluate how managers behave when problems with unethical overtones are presented to them in a managerial frame rather than an ethical frame. In the proposed managerial model, moral judgment of the situation is one of the inputs to managerial judgment, among several other inputs regarding costs and benefits of various alternatives. Managerial judgment results in managerial intent (...)
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  42. Dominic Wilkinson (2013). Death or Disability?: The 'Carmentis Machine' and Decision-Making for Critically Ill Children. Oxford University Press.score: 192.0
    Death and grief in the ancient world -- Predictions and disability in Rome.
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  43. Diego Gracia (2003). Ethical Case Deliberation and Decision Making. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (3):227-233.score: 191.4
    During the last thirty years different methods have been proposed in order to manage and resolve ethical quandaries, specially in the clinical setting. Some of these methodologies are based on the principles of Decision-making theory. Others looked to other philosophical traditions, like Principlism, Hermeneutics, Narrativism, Casuistry, Pragmatism, etc. This paper defends the view that deliberation is the cornerstone of any adequate methodology. This is due to the fact that moral decisions must take into account not only (...)
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  44. Surendra Arjoon (2007). Ethical Decision-Making: A Case for the Triple Font Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 71 (4):395 - 410.score: 191.2
    This paper discusses the philosophical argument and the application of the Triple Font Theory (TFT) for moral evaluation of human acts and attempts to integrate the conceptual components of major moral theories into a systematic internally consistent decision-making model that is theoretically driven. The paper incorporates concepts such as formal and material cooperation and the Principle of Double Effect (PDE) into the theoretical framework. It also advances the thesis that virtue theory ought to be included in (...)
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  45. Rogene A. Buchholz & Sandra B. Rosenthal (2005). The Spirit of Entrepreneurship and the Qualities of Moral Decision Making: Toward a Unifying Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (3):307 - 315.score: 191.2
    At the heart of entrepreneurship are imagination, creativity, novelty, and sensitivity. It takes these qualities to develop a new product or service and bring it to market, to envision the possible impacts a new product may make and come up with novel and creative solutions to problems that may arise. These qualities go to make up what could be called the spirit of entrepreneurship, a spirit that involves the ability to handle the experimental nature of entrepreunerial activity. These same qualities (...)
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  46. Robert W. Armstrong, Robert J. Williams & J. Douglas Barrett (2004). The Impact of Banality, Risky Shift and Escalating Commitment on Ethical Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 53 (4):365-370.score: 191.2
    This paper posits that organizational variables are the factors that lead to the moral decline of companies like Enron and Worldcom. The individuals involved created environments within the organizations that precipitated a spiral of unethical decision-making. It is proposed that at the executive level, it is the organizational factors associated with power and decision-making that have the critical influence on moral and ethical behavior. The study has used variables that were deemed to be (...)
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  47. Iain A. Davies & Andrew Crane (2003). Ethical Decision Making in Fair Trade Companies. Journal of Business Ethics 45 (1-2):79 - 92.score: 191.2
    This paper reports on a study of ethical decision-making in a fair trade company. This can be seen to be a crucial arena for investigation since fair trade firms not only have a specific ethical mission in terms of helping growers out of poverty, but they tend to be perceived as (and are often marketed on the basis of) having an "ethical" image. Eschewing a straightforward test of extant ethical decision models, we adopt (...)
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  48. Johanna Kujala & Tarja Pietiläinen (2004). Female Managers' Ethical Decision-Making: A Multidimensional Approach. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 53 (1-2):153-163.score: 191.2
    The increasing number and influence of women in society brings up several issues related to values and ethics. Looking at business ethics from the gender perspective made us ponder if it would be fruitful to analyse the feminine and masculine dimensions of decision-making style. The article follows the research tradition using the multidimensional ethics scale, and it aims at developing the scale to better include female decision-making. We came to the conclusion that, as the multidimensional ethics (...)
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  49. Anusorn Singhapakdi, Scott J. Vitell, Dong-Jin Lee, Amiee Mellon Nisius & Grace B. Yu (2013). The Influence of Love of Money and Religiosity on Ethical Decision-Making in Marketing. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (1):183-191.score: 191.2
    The impact of “love of money” on different aspects of consumers’ ethical beliefs has been investigated by previous research. In this study we investigate the potential impact of “love of money” on a manager’s ethical decision-making in marketing. Another objective of the current study is to investigate the potential impacts of extrinsic and intrinsic religiosity on ethical marketing decision-making. We also include ethical judgments as an element of ethical decision- (...). We found “love of money”, both dimensions of religiosity, and ethical judgment to have significant impacts on ethical intentions in a marketing situation. In addition to providing an important contribution to the business ethics literature, the findings also have important managerial implications. (shrink)
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  50. Allen E. Buchanan (1989). Deciding for Others: The Ethics of Surrogate Decisionmaking. Cambridge University Press.score: 190.6
    This book is the most comprehensive treatment available of one of the most urgent--and yet in some respects most neglected--problems in bioethics: decisionmaking for incompetents. Part I develops a general theory for making treatment and care decisions for patients who are not competent to decide for themselves. It provides an in-depth analysis of competence, articulates and defends a coherent set of principles to specify suitable surrogate decisionmakers and to guide their choices, examines the value of advance directives, and investigates (...)
     
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