Search results for 'Deep Structure' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    Kwang-Kuo Hwang (2001). The Deep Structure of Confucianism: A Social Psychological Approach. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):179 – 204.
    The deep structure of Confucianism is identified through structuralist analysis in order to provide a conceptual framework for conducting social psychological research in Chinese society. Through understanding and imitating the Way of Heaven (tiendao), Confucians constructed the Way of Humanity (rendao), which consists of two aspects; ethics for ordinary people and ethics for scholars. Ethics for ordinary people adopts the principle of Respecting the Superior for procedural justice and the principle of Favouring the Intimate for distributive justice; the (...)
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  2. Michael P. Levine (1992). Deep Structure and the Comparative Philosophy of Religion*: MICHAEL P. LEVINE. Religious Studies 28 (3):387-399.
    Through various applications of the ‘deep structure’ of moral and religious reasoning, I have sought to illustrate the value of a morally informed approach in helping us to understand the complexity of religious thought and practice…religions are primarily moved by rational moral concerns and…ethical theory provides the single most powerful methodology for understanding religious belief. Ronald Green, Religion and Moral Reason.
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  3.  91
    Gregg H. Rosenberg (2004). A Place for Consciousness: Probing the Deep Structure of the Natural World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    What place does consciousness have in the natural world? If we reject materialism, could there be a credible alternative? In one classic example, philosophers ask whether we can ever know what is it is like for bats to sense the world using sonar. It seems obvious to many that any amount of information about a bat's physical structure and information processing leaves us guessing about the central questions concerning the character of its experience. A Place for Consciousness begins with (...)
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  4.  14
    Michael Kubovy (2015). The Deep Structure of Lives. Philosophia Scientiæ 19:153-176.
    La psychologie a toujours traité le comportement et l’expérience comme étant enchâssés dans un flux temporel unidimensionnel, « le courant du comportement » dans lequel les événements et les actions occupent des intervalles de temps qui ne se chevauchent pas. Pourtant, une analyse phénoménologique révèle que la structure de nos vies est bien plus riche et intéressante. En utilisant la notion de « quasidécomposabilité » de Herbert Simon, je décris cette structure comme un assemblage d’épisodes quasi-indépendants se réalisant (...)
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  5. Alex Voorhoeve (2006). In Search of the Deep Structure of Morality: An Interview with Frances Kamm. Imprints 9 (2):93-117.
    In The Gay Science, Friedrich Nietzsche argued that only a form of philosophising that sprung from a deep commitment to the subject could ever hope for success. ‘All great problems’, he wrote, ‘demand great love’. He continued: It makes the most telling difference whether a thinker has a personal relationship to his problems and finds in them his destiny, his distress and his greatest happiness, or an ‘impersonal’ one, meaning he is only able to touch them with the (...)
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  6.  17
    Hugh Gibbons (1984). Justifying Law: An Explanation of the Deep Structure of American Law. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 3 (2):165 - 279.
    Charles Darwin argued that human beings are what happen whenphysical laws act upon a planet with the characteristics that earthhad five billion years ago. Similarly, I have argued that theprimacy of individual will is what eventually happens when asociety allocates and limits coercion based upon rights. From timeto time particular visions of the good or the right dominate publicbehavior, but they are eventually enframed by rights — the authoritative claim of each person to respect.I have argued that the propositional (...) of American law—the laws themselves — can be seen to be a logically consistentsystem of propositions stemming from the axiom that the will ofeach person is worthy of respect. This is an explanatory, not anormative, proposition. The axiom was not put there by anyoneand the law derived from it, any more than the human brian wasput there and the theory of relativity derived from it. The axiomcame to be embodied in k because of a fact — the single universalcharacteristic of human beings that is relevant to the question ofarranging coercion is individual will — and a process — the right ofeach person to demand a justification for coercion used upon him.Since will is universal to human beings, this would suggest thatany rights-based legal system would evince a general structuresimilar to our own. Particularities of national culture, naturalresources, population density, and so on would produce a verydifferent liberty frontier from the one facing this country andhence, different laws. But the general structure of law — the relationship between principle and policy decision, the role of thebasic rights, and so on — should be similar. This similarity shouldprovide a common basis for cooperation between states, transcending particularities of economic structure, political structure and ideology. We have seen that a very broad range ofeconomic and political institutions may be justified. The essential difference between states lies not in the different ways that theyarrange institutions but in the different ways that they justifythem. Those that justify them to people as persons are similar.Those that justify them by conformity to a design are different.The theory set out here is not a design. It is an explanation. Onevirtue of explanations is that they draw forth other explanations.More importantly, they offer perspective — they tell us what weare “up to.” As the social relations which law must rationalizebecome ever more complex, perspective becomes ever more necessary. The simple laws have already been written. The connectionbetween the doctrine of consideration and the first principle isobvious. The connection between the “hard look” doctrine ofreviewing administrative agencies and the second principle isnowhere near so obvious (though it is a lovely example of thejudicial process enframing the realm of uncertainty). The morecomplex and artificial the institution, the poorer the guidance ofintuition and the more necessary are conscious guides to decision.Justification comes easy to printers. Most of them don't knowwhy a page of print that has straight margines left and right is“justified.” They don't need to know, for the idea has immediateintuitive appeal; it is easy to accept and to remember, and, onceremembered, it is an effective guide to behavior. It is easy to seethat this line of print is not justified and to do somethingabout it. It is not so easy to tell whether the “hard look” doctrine orthe enforcement of a surrogate motherhood contract sits fairly on itspage. Justification of law requires an understanding of thecriterion against which it is being done. There is an intuitive core— a “sense” — to any act of judgment, but that core can be illuminated and developed by an understanding of the framework withinwhich it operates. (shrink)
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  7.  44
    Gilbert Harman (1970). Deep Structure as Logical Form. Synthese 21 (3-4):275 - 297.
  8.  4
    Jason Eisner (2002). Discovering Syntactic Deep Structure Via Bayesian Statistics. Cognitive Science 26 (3):255-268.
  9.  10
    Charles Smith & Mahmoud Salem (1990). Deep Structure, Cognition and Rebirth: Propositions for Viability and Vitality in Human Systems. World Futures 29 (4):265-283.
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  10. Frances Kamm (2009). In Search of the Deep Structure of Morality. In Alex Voorhoeve (ed.), Conversations on Ethics. Oxford University Press
     
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  11.  4
    George Lakoff (1968). Instrumental Adverbs and the Concept of Deep Structure. Foundations of Language 4 (1):4-29.
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  12.  7
    Lennart Åqvist (1985). On the Logical Syntax or Linguistic Deep Structure of Certain Crime Descriptions: Prolegomena to the Doctrine of Criminal Intent. Synthese 65 (2):291 - 306.
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  13.  10
    Thomas M. Olshewsky (1973). Deep Structure. The Monist 57 (3):430-442.
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  14.  2
    Jerrold J. Katz (1973). Interpretive Semantics Meets the Zombies: A Discussion of the Controversy About Deep Structure. Foundations of Language 9 (4):549-596.
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  15.  22
    Paul Skokowski (2005). Review of Gregg Rosenberg, A Place for Consciousness: Probing the Deep Structure of the Natural World. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).
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  16. Sandra A. Thompson (1971). The Deep Structure of Relative Clauses. In Charles J. Fillmore & D. Terence Langėndoen (eds.), Studies in Linguistic Semantics. Irvington 79--96.
     
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  17.  3
    Mary LeCron Foster (1974). Deep Structure in Symbolic Anthropology. Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 2 (4):334-355.
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  18.  3
    Greg Walker (1994). Political Thought and Tudor Commonwealth: Deep Structure, Discourse and Disguise. History of European Ideas 18 (3):407-407.
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  19.  1
    George Lakoff (1980). What Ever Happened to Deep Structure? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):22.
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  20.  2
    John B. Walmsley (1971). The English Comitative Case and the Concept of Deep Structure. Foundations of Language 7 (4):493-507.
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  21.  4
    Robert Albritton (2004). Theorising Capital's Deep Structure and the Transformation of Capitalism. Historical Materialism 12 (3):73-92.
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  22.  3
    Michael P. Levine (1992). Deep Structure and the Comparative Philosophy of Religion. Religious Studies 28 (3):387 - 399.
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  23.  1
    Ryszard Zuber (1975). Semantic Antinomies and Deep Structure Analysis. Semiotica 13 (3).
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  24.  1
    C. A. Perfetti (1973). Retrieval of Sentence Relations: Semantic Vs. Syntactic Deep Structure. Cognition 2 (1):95-105.
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  25.  1
    Harald Weydt (1973). On G. Lakoff,'Instrumental Adverbs and the Concept of Deep Structure', Foundations of Language 4 (1968), 4-29. Foundations of Language 10 (4):569-578.
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  26.  1
    F. Bowers (1969). The Deep Structure of Abstract Nouns. Foundations of Language 5 (4):520-533.
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  27. Mary LeCron Foster (1974). Deep Structure in Symbolic Anthropology. Ethos 2 (4):334-355.
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  28. Andrej Kowalski (forthcoming). Case-Based Reasoning and the Deep Structure Approach to Knowledge Representation, in Proceedings of the Third International Conference On. Artificial Intelligence and Law.
     
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  29. Michael Kubovy (2015). The Deep Structure of Lives. Philosophia Scientae 19:153-176.
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  30. H. A. Lewis (1973). Combinators and Deep Structure. In Radu J. Bogdan & Ilkka Niiniluoto (eds.), Logic, Language, and Probability. Boston,D. Reidel Pub. Co. 213--222.
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  31. Scott Soames (1980). Douglas Frank Stalker, "Deep Structure". [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 11:155.
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  32. Yasuhiko Tomida (1995). Idea and Thing: The Deep Structure of Locke's Theory of Knowledge. Analecta Husserliana 46:3-143.
     
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  33. J. W. Yolton (1996). Yasuhiko Tomida: Idea and Thing. The Deep Structure of Locke's Theory of Knowledge. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4:177-180.
     
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  34.  3
    Karl H. Pribram (1999). Brain and the Composition of Conscious Experience. Of Deep and Surface Structure; Frames of Reference; Episode and Executive; Models and Monitors. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (5):19-42.
    In the context of this publication on blindsight, I want to address further the brain processes critically responsible for organizing our conscious experience. As in a previous related publication , I am restricting myself to brain and conscious experience, not the fuller topic of ‘consciousness’ as this might be determined by genetic and environmental factors, nor as it is defined in Eastern traditions and in esoteric Western religion and philosophy. For my thoughts on this broader topic the reader is referred (...)
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  35. David M. Perlmutter (1971). Deep and Surface Structure Constraints in Syntax. New York,Holt, Rinehart and Winston.
     
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  36.  3
    John Collier (1986). Philosophical Issues: The Deep and the Past. The Structure of Biological Science. By Alexander Rosenberg. Cambridge University Press, 1985. PP. 281. $22.50, £27.50. [REVIEW] Bioessays 4 (1):44-44.
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  37. John Janzen (1979). Deep Thought: Structure and Intention in Kongo Prophetism, 1910-1921. Social Research 46.
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  38. Karl H. Pribram (1999). 8 The Deep and Surface Structure of Memory and Conscious Learning: Toward. In Robert L. Solso (ed.), Mind and Brain Sciences in the 21st Century. Cambridge: MIT Press 127.
  39.  23
    Mark D. Roberts (2004). P-Model Alternative to the T-Model. Web Journal of Formal, Computational and Logical Linguistics 5:1-18.
    Standard linguistic analysis of syntax uses the T-model. This model requires the ordering: D-structure > S-structure > LF, where D-structure is the sentences deep structure, S-structure is its surface structure, and LF is its logical form. Between each of these representations there is movement which alters the order of the constituent words; movement is achieved using the principles and parameters of syntactic theory. Psychological analysis of sentence production is usually either serial or connectionist. (...)
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  40. Thomas Metzinger (2003). Being No One: The Self-Model Theory of Subjectivity. MIT Press.
    " In Being No One, Metzinger, a German philosopher, draws strongly on neuroscientific research to present a representationalist and functional analysis of...
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  41.  63
    Stewart Shapiro (1997). Philosophy of Mathematics: Structure and Ontology. Oxford University Press.
    Do numbers, sets, and so forth, exist? What do mathematical statements mean? Are they literally true or false, or do they lack truth values altogether? Addressing questions that have attracted lively debate in recent years, Stewart Shapiro contends that standard realist and antirealist accounts of mathematics are both problematic. As Benacerraf first noted, we are confronted with the following powerful dilemma. The desired continuity between mathematical and, say, scientific language suggests realism, but realism in this context suggests seemingly intractable epistemic (...)
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  42.  5
    Peter Davson-Galle (1992). Arguing, Arguments, and Deep Disagreements. Informal Logic 14 (2).
    In response to earlier papers in Informal Logic by Robert Fogelin and Andrew Lugg, this paper explores the issue of whether disagreement could ever be so deep that it defied rational resolution. Contra Lugg, I agree with Fogelin that such unresolvable disagreement is possible and, contra Fogelin, I suggest that the focus of such disagreement can be quite Iimited-a single proposition rather than a whole system of beliefs. I also suggest that emphasising arguing as a human practice rather than (...)
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  43. Margaret L. Atherton & R. Schwarz (1974). Linguistic Innateness and its Evidence. Journal of Philosophy 71 (March):155-168.
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  44.  13
    A. D. Moses (1998). Structure and Agency in the Holocaust: Daniel J. Goldhagen and His Critics. History and Theory 37 (2):194–219.
    A striking aspect of the so-called "Goldhagen debate" has been the bifurcated reception Hitler's Willing Executioners has received: the enthusiastic welcome of journalists and the public was as warm as the impatient dismissal of most historians was cool. This article seeks to transcend the current impasse by analyzing the underlying issues of Holocaust research at stake here. It argues that a "deep structure" necessarily characterizes the historiography of the Holocaust, comprising a tension between its positioning in "universalism" and (...)
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  45.  4
    Peter Suber, Saving Machines From Themselves: The Ethics of Deep Self-Modification.
    We human beings do have the power to modify our deep structure, through drugs and surgery. But we cannot yet use this power with enough precision to make deep changes to our neural structure without high risk of death or disability. There are two reasons why we find ourselves in this position. First, our instruments of self-modification are crude. Second, we have very limited knowledge about where and how to apply our instruments to get specific desirable (...)
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  46.  6
    Eric Funkhouser (2014). The Logical Structure of Kinds. OUP Oxford.
    Eric Funkhouser uncovers a logical structure that is common to many, if not all, classificatory systems or taxonomies. Every conceptual scheme--including the sciences, mathematics, and ethics--classifies things into kinds. Given their ubiquity across theoretical contexts, we would benefit from understanding the nature of such kinds. Significantly, most conceptual schemes posit kinds that vary in their degree of specificity. Species-genus taxonomies provide us with familiar examples, with the species classification being more specific than the genus classification. This book instead focuses (...)
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  47.  23
    Anthony Vincent Fernandez (2014). Depression as Existential Feeling or de-Situatedness? Distinguishing Structure From Mode in Psychopathology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (4):595-612.
    In this paper I offer an alternative phenomenological account of depression as consisting of a degradation of the degree to which one is situated in and attuned to the world. This account contrasts with recent accounts of depression offered by Matthew Ratcliffe and others. Ratcliffe develops an account in which depression is understood in terms of deep moods, or existential feelings, such as guilt or hopelessness. Such moods are capable of limiting the kinds of significance and meaning that (...)
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  48.  5
    Thomas E. Schlaepfer, Michael X. Cohen, Caroline Frick, Markus Mathaus Kosel, Daniela Brodesser, Nikolai Axmacher, Alexius Young Joe, Martina Kreft, Doris Lenartz & Volker Sturm, Deep Brain Stimulation to Reward Circuitry Alleviates Anhedonia in Refractory Major Depression.
    Deep brain stimulation to different sites allows interfering with dysfunctional network function implicated in major depression. Because a prominent clinical feature of depression is anhedonia--the inability to experience pleasure from previously pleasurable activities--and because there is clear evidence of dysfunctions of the reward system in depression, DBS to the nucleus accumbens might offer a new possibility to target depressive symptomatology in otherwise treatment-resistant depression. Three patients suffering from extremely resistant forms of depression, who did not respond to pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, (...)
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  49.  30
    Marcus Kracht (2007). The Emergence of Syntactic Structure. Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (1):47 - 95.
    The present paper is the result of a long struggle to understand how the notion of compositionality can be used to motivate the structure of a sentence. While everyone seems to have intuitions about which proposals are compositional and which ones are not, these intuitions generally have no formal basis. What is needed to make such arguments work is a proper understanding of what meanings are and how they can be manipulated. In particular, we need a definition of meaning (...)
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  50.  56
    Alison Simmons (2003). Descartes on the Cognitive Structure of Sensory Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (3):549–579.
    Descartes is often thought to bifurcate sensory experience into two distinct cognitive components: the sensing of secondary qualities and the more or less intellectual perceiving of primary qualities. A closer examination of his analysis of sensory perception in the Sixth Replies and his treatment of sensory processing in the Dioptrics and Treatise on Man teIls a different story. I argue that Descartes offers a unified cognitive account of sensory experience according to which the senses and intellect operate together to produce (...)
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