Search results for 'Deep Structure' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kwang-Kuo Hwang (2001). The Deep Structure of Confucianism: A Social Psychological Approach. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):179 – 204.score: 120.0
    The deep structure of Confucianism is identified through structuralist analysis in order to provide a conceptual framework for conducting social psychological research in Chinese society. Through understanding and imitating the Way of Heaven (tiendao), Confucians constructed the Way of Humanity (rendao), which consists of two aspects; ethics for ordinary people and ethics for scholars. Ethics for ordinary people adopts the principle of Respecting the Superior for procedural justice and the principle of Favouring the Intimate for distributive justice; the (...)
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  2. Gregg H. Rosenberg (2004). A Place for Consciousness: Probing the Deep Structure of the Natural World. Oxford: Oxford University Press.score: 96.0
    What place does consciousness have in the natural world? If we reject materialism, could there be a credible alternative? In one classic example, philosophers ask whether we can ever know what is it is like for bats to sense the world using sonar. It seems obvious to many that any amount of information about a bat's physical structure and information processing leaves us guessing about the central questions concerning the character of its experience. A Place for Consciousness begins with (...)
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  3. Alex Voorhoeve (2006). In Search of the Deep Structure of Morality: An Interview with Frances Kamm. Imprints 9 (2):93-117.score: 96.0
    In The Gay Science, Friedrich Nietzsche argued that only a form of philosophising that sprung from a deep commitment to the subject could ever hope for success. ‘All great problems’, he wrote, ‘demand great love’. He continued: It makes the most telling difference whether a thinker has a personal relationship to his problems and finds in them his destiny, his distress and his greatest happiness, or an ‘impersonal’ one, meaning he is only able to touch them with the antennae (...)
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  4. Hugh Gibbons (1984). Justifying Law: An Explanation of the Deep Structure of American Law. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 3 (2):165 - 279.score: 96.0
    Charles Darwin argued that human beings are what happen whenphysical laws act upon a planet with the characteristics that earthhad five billion years ago. Similarly, I have argued that theprimacy of individual will is what eventually happens when asociety allocates and limits coercion based upon rights. From timeto time particular visions of the good or the right dominate publicbehavior, but they are eventually enframed by rights — the authoritative claim of each person to respect.I have argued that the propositional (...) of American law—the laws themselves — can be seen to be a logically consistentsystem of propositions stemming from the axiom that the will ofeach person is worthy of respect. This is an explanatory, not anormative, proposition. The axiom was not put there by anyoneand the law derived from it, any more than the human brian wasput there and the theory of relativity derived from it. The axiomcame to be embodied in k because of a fact — the single universalcharacteristic of human beings that is relevant to the question ofarranging coercion is individual will — and a process — the right ofeach person to demand a justification for coercion used upon him.Since will is universal to human beings, this would suggest thatany rights-based legal system would evince a general structuresimilar to our own. Particularities of national culture, naturalresources, population density, and so on would produce a verydifferent liberty frontier from the one facing this country andhence, different laws. But the general structure of law — the relationship between principle and policy decision, the role of thebasic rights, and so on — should be similar. This similarity shouldprovide a common basis for cooperation between states, transcending particularities of economic structure, political structure and ideology. We have seen that a very broad range ofeconomic and political institutions may be justified. The essential difference between states lies not in the different ways that theyarrange institutions but in the different ways that they justifythem. Those that justify them to people as persons are similar.Those that justify them by conformity to a design are different.The theory set out here is not a design. It is an explanation. Onevirtue of explanations is that they draw forth other explanations.More importantly, they offer perspective — they tell us what weare “up to.” As the social relations which law must rationalizebecome ever more complex, perspective becomes ever more necessary. The simple laws have already been written. The connectionbetween the doctrine of consideration and the first principle isobvious. The connection between the “hard look” doctrine ofreviewing administrative agencies and the second principle isnowhere near so obvious (though it is a lovely example of thejudicial process enframing the realm of uncertainty). The morecomplex and artificial the institution, the poorer the guidance ofintuition and the more necessary are conscious guides to decision.Justification comes easy to printers. Most of them don't knowwhy a page of print that has straight margines left and right is“justified.” They don't need to know, for the idea has immediateintuitive appeal; it is easy to accept and to remember, and, onceremembered, it is an effective guide to behavior. It is easy to seethat this line of print is not justified and to do somethingabout it. It is not so easy to tell whether the “hard look” doctrine orthe enforcement of a surrogate motherhood contract sits fairly on itspage. Justification of law requires an understanding of thecriterion against which it is being done. There is an intuitive core— a “sense” — to any act of judgment, but that core can be illuminated and developed by an understanding of the framework withinwhich it operates. (shrink)
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  5. Gilbert Harman (1970). Deep Structure as Logical Form. Synthese 21 (3-4):275 - 297.score: 90.0
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  6. Paul Skokowski (2005). Review of Gregg Rosenberg, A Place for Consciousness: Probing the Deep Structure of the Natural World. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (10).score: 90.0
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  7. Michael P. Levine (1992). Deep Structure and the Comparative Philosophy of Religion. Religious Studies 28 (3):387 - 399.score: 90.0
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  8. Robert Albritton (2004). Theorising Capital's Deep Structure and the Transformation of Capitalism. Historical Materialism 12 (3):73-92.score: 90.0
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  9. Charles Smith & Mahmoud Salem (1990). Deep Structure, Cognition and Rebirth: Propositions for Viability and Vitality in Human Systems. World Futures 29 (4):265-283.score: 90.0
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  10. George Lakoff (forthcoming). Instrumental Adverbs and the Concept of Deep Structure. Foundations of Language.score: 90.0
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  11. Lennart Åqvist (1985). On the Logical Syntax or Linguistic Deep Structure of Certain Crime Descriptions: Prolegomena to the Doctrine of Criminal Intent. Synthese 65 (2):291 - 306.score: 90.0
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  12. Greg Walker (1994). Political Thought and Tudor Commonwealth: Deep Structure, Discourse and Disguise. History of European Ideas 18 (3):407-407.score: 90.0
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  13. Frederick Bowers (forthcoming). The Deep Structure of Abstract Nouns. Foundations of Language.score: 90.0
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  14. Jason Eisner (2002). Discovering Syntactic Deep Structure Via Bayesian Statistics. Cognitive Science 26 (3):255-268.score: 90.0
  15. Thomas M. Olshewsky (1973). Deep Structure. The Monist 57 (3):430-442.score: 90.0
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  16. C. A. Perfetti (1973). Retrieval of Sentence Relations: Semantic Vs. Syntactic Deep Structure. Cognition 2 (1):95-105.score: 90.0
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  17. Mark D. Roberts (2004). P-Model Alternative to the T-Model. Web Journal of Formal, Computational and Logical Linguistics 5:1-18.score: 90.0
    Standard linguistic analysis of syntax uses the T-model. This model requires the ordering: D-structure > S-structure > LF, where D-structure is the sentences deep structure, S-structure is its surface structure, and LF is its logical form. Between each of these representations there is movement which alters the order of the constituent words; movement is achieved using the principles and parameters of syntactic theory. Psychological analysis of sentence production is usually either serial or connectionist. (...)
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  18. John B. Walmsley (forthcoming). The English Comitative Case and the Concept of Deep Structure. Foundations of Language.score: 90.0
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  19. Harald Weydt (1973). On G. Lakoff,'Instrumental Adverbs and the Concept of Deep Structure', Foundations of Language 4 (1968), 4-29. Foundations of Language 10 (4):569-578.score: 90.0
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  20. Mary LeCron Foster (1974). Deep Structure in Symbolic Anthropology. Ethos 2 (4):334-355.score: 90.0
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  21. Frances Kamm (2009). In Search of the Deep Structure of Morality. In Alex Voorhoeve (ed.), Conversations on Ethics. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
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  22. Jerrold J. Katz (1973). Interpretive Semantics Meets the Zombies: A Discussion of the Controversy About Deep Structure. Foundations of Language 9 (4):549-596.score: 90.0
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  23. Andrej Kowalski (forthcoming). Case-Based Reasoning and the Deep Structure Approach to Knowledge Representation, in Proceedings of the Third International Conference On. Artificial Intelligence and Law.score: 90.0
     
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  24. George Lakoff (1980). What Ever Happened to Deep Structure? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (1):22.score: 90.0
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  25. H. A. Lewis (1973). Combinators and Deep Structure. In. In Radu J. Bogdan & Ilkka Niiniluoto (eds.), Logic, Language, and Probability. Boston,D. Reidel Pub. Co.. 213--222.score: 90.0
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  26. Sandra A. Thompson (1971). The Deep Structure of Relative Clauses. In Charles J. Fillmore & D. Terence Langėndoen (eds.), Studies in Linguistic Semantics. Irvington. 79--96.score: 90.0
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  27. Yasuhiko Tomida (1995). Idea and Thing: The Deep Structure of Locke's Theory of Knowledge. Analecta Husserliana 46:3-143.score: 90.0
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  28. J. W. Yolton (1996). Yasuhiko Tomida: Idea and Thing. The Deep Structure of Locke's Theory of Knowledge. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4:177-180.score: 90.0
     
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  29. Ryszard Zuber (1975). Semantic Antinomies and Deep Structure Analysis. Semiotica 13 (3).score: 90.0
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  30. John Collier (1986). Philosophical Issues: The Deep and the Past. The Structure of Biological Science. By Alexander Rosenberg. Cambridge University Press, 1985. PP. 281. $22.50, £27.50. [REVIEW] Bioessays 4 (1):44-44.score: 72.0
  31. David M. Perlmutter (1971). Deep and Surface Structure Constraints in Syntax. New York,Holt, Rinehart and Winston.score: 72.0
     
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  32. John M. Janzen (forthcoming). Deep Thought: Structure and Intention in Kongo Prophetism, 1910—1921. Social Research.score: 72.0
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  33. Karl H. Pribram (1999). Brain and the Composition of Conscious Experience. Of Deep and Surface Structure; Frames of Reference; Episode and Executive; Models and Monitors. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (5):19-42.score: 72.0
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  34. Karl H. Pribram (1999). 8 The Deep and Surface Structure of Memory and Conscious Learning: Toward. In Robert L. Solso (ed.), Mind and Brain Sciences in the 21st Century. Cambridge: Mit Press. 127.score: 72.0
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  35. Thomas Metzinger (2003). Being No One: The Self-Model Theory of Subjectivity. MIT Press.score: 60.0
    " In Being No One, Metzinger, a German philosopher, draws strongly on neuroscientific research to present a representationalist and functional analysis of...
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  36. Margaret L. Atherton & R. Schwarz (1974). Linguistic Innateness and its Evidence. Journal of Philosophy 71 (March):155-168.score: 60.0
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  37. Peter Davson-Galle (1992). Arguing, Arguments, and Deep Disagreements. Informal Logic 14 (2).score: 54.0
    In response to earlier papers in Informal Logic by Robert Fogelin and Andrew Lugg, this paper explores the issue of whether disagreement could ever be so deep that it defied rational resolution. Contra Lugg, I agree with Fogelin that such unresolvable disagreement is possible and, contra Fogelin, I suggest that the focus of such disagreement can be quite Iimited-a single proposition rather than a whole system of beliefs. I also suggest that emphasising arguing as a human practice rather than (...)
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  38. Peter Suber, Saving Machines From Themselves: The Ethics of Deep Self-Modification.score: 48.0
    We human beings do have the power to modify our deep structure, through drugs and surgery. But we cannot yet use this power with enough precision to make deep changes to our neural structure without high risk of death or disability. There are two reasons why we find ourselves in this position. First, our instruments of self-modification are crude. Second, we have very limited knowledge about where and how to apply our instruments to get specific desirable (...)
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  39. Alison Simmons (2003). Descartes on the Cognitive Structure of Sensory Experience. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (3):549–579.score: 42.0
    Descartes is often thought to bifurcate sensory experience into two distinct cognitive components: the sensing of secondary qualities and the more or less intellectual perceiving of primary qualities. A closer examination of his analysis of sensory perception in the Sixth Replies and his treatment of sensory processing in the Dioptrics and Treatise on Man teIls a different story. I argue that Descartes offers a unified cognitive account of sensory experience according to which the senses and intellect operate together to produce (...)
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  40. Stewart Shapiro (1997). Philosophy of Mathematics: Structure and Ontology. Oxford University Press.score: 42.0
    Do numbers, sets, and so forth, exist? What do mathematical statements mean? Are they literally true or false, or do they lack truth values altogether? Addressing questions that have attracted lively debate in recent years, Stewart Shapiro contends that standard realist and antirealist accounts of mathematics are both problematic. As Benacerraf first noted, we are confronted with the following powerful dilemma. The desired continuity between mathematical and, say, scientific language suggests realism, but realism in this context suggests seemingly intractable epistemic (...)
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  41. Marcus Kracht (2007). The Emergence of Syntactic Structure. Linguistics and Philosophy 30 (1):47 - 95.score: 42.0
    The present paper is the result of a long struggle to understand how the notion of compositionality can be used to motivate the structure of a sentence. While everyone seems to have intuitions about which proposals are compositional and which ones are not, these intuitions generally have no formal basis. What is needed to make such arguments work is a proper understanding of what meanings are and how they can be manipulated. In particular, we need a definition of meaning (...)
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  42. Paulo César Rodrigues (2013). Psychology, Metaphysics and Literature: The Description of Deep Feelings in Bergson. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (1):81-100.score: 42.0
    O objetivo deste artigo é o de explorar as relações entre psicologia, metafísica e literatura, a partir do exame do Ensaio sobre os dados imediatos da consciência; mais exatamente, a partir da compreensão dos "sentimentos profundos", que representa, no Ensaio, o momento privilegiado para apreender a estrutura temporal da consciência. Porém, o presente estudo não abordará unicamente o texto de Bergson, suas descrições dos sentimentos profundos (como as emoções estéticas e morais), o que muito provavelmente seria repetitivo. O uso de (...)
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  43. Philip Van Loocke (2002). Deep Teleology in Artificial Systems. Minds and Machines 12 (1):87-104.score: 42.0
    Teleological variations of non-deterministic processes are defined. The immediate past of a system defines the state from which the ordinary (non-teleological) dynamical law governing the system derives different possible present states. For every possible present state, again a number of possible states for the next time step can be defined, and so on. After k time steps, a selection criterion is applied. The present state leading to the selected state after k time steps is taken to be the effective present (...)
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  44. Anthony Vincent Fernandez (forthcoming). Depression as Existential Feeling or de-Situatedness? Distinguishing Structure From Mode in Psychopathology. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-18.score: 42.0
    In this paper I offer an alternative phenomenological account of depression as consisting of a degradation of the degree to which one is situated in and attuned to the world. This account contrasts with recent accounts of depression offered by Matthew Ratcliffe and others. Ratcliffe develops an account in which depression is understood in terms of deep moods, or existential feelings, such as guilt or hopelessness. Such moods are capable of limiting the kinds of significance and meaning that one (...)
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  45. Elize Bisanz (2002). The Abstract Structure of the Aesthetic Sign. Sign Systems Studies 30 (2):707-721.score: 42.0
    Walter Benjamin foreshadowed many of the aesthetic theories, currently playing a fundamental role in the production and interpretation of art. By emphasising the role of the expressive character of art, or rather the category of expressivity itself, Benjamin defined art as a language. His aesthetics was characterised by the continuous interaction of two almost reciprocal projects: the theoretical critique of art which is based on an understanding of historical processes, and the understanding of historical processes which is formed by the (...)
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  46. Joanna Korman (2011). Concept Revision is Sensitive to Changes in Category Structure, Causal History. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 34 (3):135-136.score: 42.0
    Carey argues that the aspects of categorization that are diagnostic of deep conceptual structure and, by extension, narrow conceptual content, must be distinguished from those aspects that are incidental to categorization tasks. For natural kind concepts, discriminating between these two types of processes is complicated by the role of explanatory stance and the causal history of features in determining category structure.
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  47. Thomas E. Schlaepfer, Michael X. Cohen, Caroline Frick, Markus Mathaus Kosel, Daniela Brodesser, Nikolai Axmacher, Alexius Young Joe, Martina Kreft, Doris Lenartz & Volker Sturm, Deep Brain Stimulation to Reward Circuitry Alleviates Anhedonia in Refractory Major Depression.score: 42.0
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) to different sites allows interfering with dysfunctional network function implicated in major depression. Because a prominent clinical feature of depression is anhedonia--the inability to experience pleasure from previously pleasurable activities--and because there is clear evidence of dysfunctions of the reward system in depression, DBS to the nucleus accumbens might offer a new possibility to target depressive symptomatology in otherwise treatment-resistant depression. Three patients suffering from extremely resistant forms of depression, who did not respond to pharmacotherapy, (...)
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  48. Peter M. Todd & Gerd Gigerenzer (2000). Précis of Simple Heuristics That Make Us Smart. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (5):727-741.score: 36.0
    How can anyone be rational in a world where knowledge is limited, time is pressing, and deep thought is often an unattainable luxury? Traditional models of unbounded rationality and optimization in cognitive science, economics, and animal behavior have tended to view decision-makers as possessing supernatural powers of reason, limitless knowledge, and endless time. But understanding decisions in the real world requires a more psychologically plausible notion of bounded rationality. In Simple heuristics that make us smart (Gigerenzer et al. 1999), (...)
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  49. Geoffrey Hinton (2013). Where Do Features Come From? Cognitive Science 37 (7):n/a-n/a.score: 36.0
    It is possible to learn multiple layers of non-linear features by backpropagating error derivatives through a feedforward neural network. This is a very effective learning procedure when there is a huge amount of labeled training data, but for many learning tasks very few labeled examples are available. In an effort to overcome the need for labeled data, several different generative models were developed that learned interesting features by modeling the higher order statistical structure of a set of input vectors. (...)
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  50. Cordula Brand (2009). Am I Still Me? Personal Identity in Neuroethical Debates. Medicine Studies 1 (4):393-406.score: 36.0
    Neurosurgery is a topic that evokes many hopes and fears at the same time. One of these fears is concerned with the worry about losing one's identity. Taking this concern seriously, the article deals with the question: Can the concept of ‘personal identity’ be used successfully in normative considerations concerning neurosurgery? This question will be answered in three steps. First, a short introduction to the philosophical debate about personal identity is given. Second, a new theory of personal identity is presented. (...)
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