Search results for 'Deep ecology Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  54
    Colette Sciberras (2002). Deep Ecology and Ecofeminism: The Self in Environmental Philosophy. Dissertation, Lancaster
    I consider the issue of the self and its relation to the environment, focusing on the accounts given in ecofeminism and deep ecology. Though both stress the relatedness of the human self to nature, these accounts differ in various ways. Ecofeminism stresses the value of personal relations with particular others, whereas deep ecology argues that we should expand our sense of self to include all natural others and the whole of nature. Deep ecology’s views (...)
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  2. Frederic L. Bender (2003). The Culture of Extinction: Toward a Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Humanity Books.
     
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  3.  22
    Benjamin Howe (2010). Was Arne Naess Recognized as the Founder of Deep Ecology Prematurely? Semantics and Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 32 (4):369-383.
    According to Arne Naess, his environmental philosophy is influenced by the philosophy of language called empirical semantics, which he first developed in the 1930s as a participant in the seminars of the Vienna Circle. While no one denies his claim, most of his commentators defend views about his environmental philosophy that contradict the tenets of his semantics. In particular, they argue that he holds that deep ecology’s supporters share a world view, and that the (...)
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  4. Eric Katz, Andrew Light & David Rothenberg (2000). Beneath the Surface Critical Essays in the Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  5. Warwick Fox (forthcoming). Deep Ecology: A New Philosophy of Our Time? Environmental Ethics.
     
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  6. Kent Peacock (2003). Eric Katz, Andrew Light and David Rothenberg, Eds., Beneath the Surface: Critical Essays in the Philosophy of Deep Ecology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 23 (2):110-112.
     
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  7.  9
    Anthony Weston (2001). Beneath the Surface: Critical Essays in the Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 23 (3):331-334.
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  8. Common Ground (2003). Agyeman, Julian, Bullard, Robert D. And Evans, Bob (Eds)(2003) Just Sustainabilities: Development in an Unequal World, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Bender, Frederic L.(2003) The Culture of Extinction: Toward a Philosophy of Deep Ecology, Amherst, NY: Humanity Books. Greenough, Paul R. And Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt (2003) Nature in the Global South. [REVIEW] Ethics, Place and Environment 6 (3):283-284.
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  9.  2
    Peter Reed & David Rothenberg (1992). Wisdom in the Open Air: The Norwegian Roots of Deep Ecology. Univ of Minnesota Press.
  10.  36
    Terry Hoy (2000). Toward a Naturalistic Political Theory: Aristotle, Hume, Dewey, Evolutionary Biology, and Deep Ecology. Praeger.
    Hoy seeks to establish a basis for a naturalistic political theory as a continuity from Aristotle through the Enlightenment and Post-Enlightenment contributions ...
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  11.  11
    Hans-Dirk van Hoogstraten (2001). Deep Economy: Caring for Ecology, Humanity, and Religion. James Clarke & Co..
    A wide-ranging analysis of the economic world order and its ecological and theological dimensions, this unique and challenging work confronts us with the ...
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  12.  42
    Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental (...)
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  13.  81
    Arne Naess (1984). A Defence of the Deep Ecology Movement. Environmental Ethics 6 (3):265-270.
    There is an international deep ecology social movement with key terms, slogans, and rhetorical use of language comparable to what we find in other activist “alternative” movements today. Some supporters of the movement partake in academic philosophy and have developed or at least suggested philosophies, “ecosophies,” inspired by the movement. R. A. Watson does not distinguish sufficiently between the movement and the philosophical expressions with academic pretensions. As a result, he falsely concludes that deep (...) implies setting man apart from nature-a kind of “anthropocentrism” in his terminology: humans and only humans have no right to interfere with natural processes. What the deep ecology movement insists on is rather that life on Earth has intrinsic value and that human behavior should and must change drastically-and soon. (shrink)
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  14.  2
    Magdalena Holy-Luczaj (2015). Heidegger's Support for Deep Ecology Reexamined Once Again: Ontological Egalitarianism, or Farewell to the Great Chain of Being. Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):45-66.
    It is said an attempt to reconcile Heidegger's ontology with the position of deep ecology finds the going rugged. Yet, I believe it is worth hiking this path once again to reexamine the connections between deep ecology and the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. Significantly, we will see the importance of Heidegger's critique of the idea of the great chain of being.Taking the perspective of deep ecology requires us to consider whether Heidegger's being-centered approach (...)
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  15.  31
    Deane Curtin (1994). Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. (...)
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  16.  28
    Simon P. James (2000). “Thing-Centered” Holism in Buddhism, Heidegger, and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):359-375.
    I address the problem of reconciling environmental holism with the intrinsic value of individual beings. Drawing upon Madhyamaka Buddhism, the later philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and deep ecology, I present a distinctly holistic conception of nature that, nevertheless, retains a commitment to the intrinsic worth of individual beings. I conclude with an examination of the practical implications of this “thing-centered holism” for environmental ethics.
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  17.  9
    Harold Glasser (1997). On Warwick Fox's Assessment of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 19 (1):69-85.
    I examine Fox’s tripartite characterization of deep ecology. His assessment abandons Naess’s emphasis upon the pluralism of ultimate norms by distilling what I refer to as the deep ecology approach to “Self-realization!” Contrary to Fox, I argue that his popular sense is distinctive and his formal sense is tenable. Fox’s philosophical sense, while distinctive, is neither necessary nor sufficient to adequately characterize the deep ecology approach. I contend that the deep ecology approach, (...)
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  18.  7
    Eric H. Reitan (1996). Deep Ecology and the Irrelevance of Morality. Environmental Ethics 18 (4):411-424.
    Both Arne Naess and Warwick Fox have argued that deep ecology, in terms of “Selfrealization,” is essentially nonmoral. I argue that the attainment of the ecological Self does not render morality in the richest sense “superfluous,” as Fox suggests. To the contrary, the achievement of the ecological Self is a precondition for being a truly moral person, both from the perspective of a robust Kantian moral frameworkand from the perspective of Aristotelian virtue ethics. The opposition between selfregard and (...)
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  19.  38
    Harold Glasser (2011). Naess's Deep Ecology: Implications for the Human Prospect and Challenges for the Future. Inquiry 54 (1):52-77.
    What sets Naess's deep ecology apart from most inquiries into environmental philosophy is that it does not seek a radical shift in fundamental values. Naess offered a utopian, life-affirming grand narrative, a new Weltanschauung that shifted the focus of inquiry to coupling values, knowledge, understanding, and wisdom to behavior. The core of Naess's approach is that sustainability hinges on developing more thoroughly reasoned and consistent views, policies, and actions, which are tied back to wide-identifying ultimate norms and (...)
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  20.  14
    Robert Sessions (1991). Deep Ecology Versus Ecofeminism: Healthy Differences or Incompatible Philosophies? Hypatia 6 (1):90 - 107.
    Deep ecology and ecofeminism are contemporary environmental philosophies that share the desire to supplant the predominant Western anthropocentric environmental frameworks. Recently thinkers from these movements have focused their critiques on each other, and substantial differences have emerged. This essay explores central aspects of this debate to ascertain whether either philosophy has been undermined in the process and whether there are any indications that they are compatible despite their differences.
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  21.  64
    Bill Devall (2001). The Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movement: 1960-2000--A Review. Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):18-41.
    : Aarne Naess, in a seminal paper on environmental philosophy, distinguished between two streams of environmental philosophy and activism--shallow and deep. The deep, long-range ecology movement has developed over the past four decades on a variety of fronts. However, in the context of global conferences on development, population, and environment held during the 1990s, even shallow environmentalism seems to have less priority than demands for worldwide economic growth based on trade liberalization and a free market (...)
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  22.  28
    William Aiken (1994). Is Deep Ecology Too Radical? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (4):1-5.
    The theory of Deep Ecology is characterized as having two essential features: the belief that nature is inherently valuable, and the belief that one’s self is truly realized by identification with nature. Four common but different meanings of the term “radical” are presented. Whether the theory of Deep Ecology is “too radical” depends upon which of these meanings one is using.
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  23.  9
    Glen Mazis (2004). Deep Ecology, The Reversibility of the Flesh of the World and the Poetic Word. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):46-61.
    This essay seeks to supplement Arnie Naess’s avowed project of replacing the often cited model of “humans and environment,” which retains a dualistic and anthropocentric connotation, with the articulation of a “relational total-field image” of human being’s insertion in the planetary field of energy and becoming. In response to the interview “Here I Stand” in which Naess rejects Merleau-Ponty’s ontology, this essay details the ways in which Merleau-Ponty provides the kind of ontology that Naess requires for his deep (...). Naess’s use of Hindu terms and metaphysics is shown to be at odds with his descriptions of human’s relations with the world. Much of the essay critiques as well Naess’s rejection of poetic language as inadequate to the philosophical task of articulating the human-world intertwining. Using Merleau-Ponty’s work, the need for the poetic as uniquely articulating “the flesh of the world” and “reversibility” is described, hopefully showing that deep ecology’s goal of making people feel their insertion in the world’s field of becoming can only occur through inaugurating poetic uses of language. (shrink)
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  24. Harold Glasser (forthcoming). Demystifying the Critiques of Deep Ecology. Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology. Upper Saddle River, Nj: Prentice Hall.
     
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  25.  13
    David Keller (1997). Gleaning Lessons From Deep Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 2 (2):139-148.
    By reflecting on deep ecology, several lessons can be culled for environmental philosophy in general. The deep ecology of Arne Naess, Bill Devall, and George Sessions is appropriately characterized as a theory founded on the principles of biocentric egalitarianism and metaphysical holism. After considering each of these principles in turn, and then in relation to each other, the lesson turns out to be that the ontological foundation for environmental ethics must be nonegalitarion and polycentric.
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  26.  15
    Wendy Lee-Lampshire (1996). Anthropomorphism Without Anthropocentrism: A Wittgensteinian Ecofeminist Alternative to Deep Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 1 (2):91-102.
    While articulating a philosophy of ecology which reconciles deep ecology with ecofeminism may be a laudable project, it remains at best unclear whether this attempt will be successful. I argue that one recent attempt, Carol Bigwood's feminized deep ecology, fails in that, despite disclaimers, it reproduces important elements of some deep ecologist's essentializing discourse which ecofeminists argue are responsible for the identification with and dual oppression of women and nature. I then propose an (...)
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  27.  1
    Stewart Davidson (2007). The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism. Environmental Values 16 (3):313-332.
    Bioregionalism is often presented as the politics of deep ecology, or deep ecology 's social philosophy. That the ties uniting these doctrines are rarely explored can be put down to a perception amongst commentators that such links are self-evident and therefore unworthy of closer examination. By arguing that the bonds between deep ecology and bioregionalism are more tenuous than has often been assumed, this paper addresses this theoretical lacuna. There is nothing exclusive to (...)
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  28.  25
    William Grey (1986). A Critique of Deep Ecology. Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):211-216.
    Our environmental crisis is commonly explained as a product of a set of attitudes and beliefs about the world which have been developed by post‐Cartesian technological society. Deep ecologists claim that the crisis can only be overcome by adopting an alternative non‐technological paradigm, such as can be discovered in non‐Western cultures. In this paper I express misgivings about the use of the expression ‘Paradigm’ by deep ecologists, question the claim that a science‐based world‐view inevitably fosters manipulative and exploitative (...)
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  29.  15
    Christian Diehm (2004). Deep Ecology and Phenomenology. Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):20-27.
    This essay is written as a companion to the interview “Here I Stand,” and it examines the place of phenomenology in the environmental thought of deep ecologist Arne Naess. Tracing a line through Naess’s somewhat sporadic references to phenomenology, and his comments in the interview, the article argues that Naess’s interest in phenomenology is tied to his attempts to develop an ontology, and tries to show how this project situates Naess in relation to several phenomenologists. The essay concludes with (...)
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  30. David Pepper (1993). Eco-Socialism: From Deep Ecology to Social Justice. Routledge.
    Presents a provocatively anthropocentric analysis of the way forward for green politics and environmental movements, exposing the deficiencies and contradictions of green approaches to post-modern politics and deep ecology. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  31. William Grey (1993). Anthropocentrism and Deep Ecology. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 71 (4):463 – 475.
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  32.  27
    Hwa Yol Jung (1991). The Way of Ecopiety: An Essay in Deep Ecology From a Sinitic Perspective. Asian Philosophy 1 (2):127 – 140.
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  33. Richard Sylvan (1985). A Critique of Deep Ecology. Radical Philosophy 40:2.
     
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  34.  17
    Alan R. Drengson (1987). A Critique of Deep Ecology? Response to William Grey. Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):223-227.
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  35.  12
    Warwick Fox (2000). Deep Ecology and Virtue Ethics. Philosophy Now 26:21-23.
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  36. John P. Clark (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy Review of Books 8 (8):49-53.
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  37. D. R. Keller (2008). Deep Ecology. In Baird Callicott & Robert Frodeman (eds.), Encyclopedia of Environmental Ethics and Philosophy. Macmillan Reference 206--211.
     
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  38. Sandra Tomsons (2002). David Landis Barnhill and Roger S. Gottlieb, Eds., Deep Ecology and World Religions: New Essays on Sacred Ground Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 22 (6):391-393.
     
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  39. Huang Yanping (2002). Arne Naess on Deep Ecology. Modern Philosophy 2:009.
  40. George Bradford (forthcoming). Toward a Deep Social Ecology. Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology.
     
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  41. Kevin deLaplante, Bryson Brown & Kent A. Peacock (eds.) (2011). Philosophy of Ecology. North-Holland.
    The most pressing problems facing humanity today - over-population, energy shortages, climate change, soil erosion, species extinctions, the risk of epidemic disease, the threat of warfare that could destroy all the hard-won gains of civilization, and even the recent fibrillations of the stock market - are all ecological or have a large ecological component. in this volume philosophers turn their attention to understanding the science of ecology and its huge implications for the human project. To get the application of (...)
     
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  42.  36
    Andrew McLaughlin (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. State University of New York Press.
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
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  43. Philip W. Sutton (2004). Nature, Environment, and Society. Palgrave Macmillan.
    How have sociologists responded to the emergence of environmentalism? What has sociology to offer the study of environmental problems? This uniquely comprehensive guide traces the origins and development of environmental movements and environmental issues, providing a critical review of the most significant debates in the new field of environmental sociology. It covers environmental ideas, environmental movements, social constructionism, critical realism, "ecocentric" theory, environmental identities, risk society theory, sustainable development, Green consumerism, ecological modernization and debates around modernity and post- modernity. Philip (...)
     
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  44. Arran Stibbe (2006). Deep Ecology and Language: The Curtailed Journey of the Atlantic Salmon. Society and Animals 14 (1):61-77.
    This article explores the representation of fish in ecological discourse through analysis of the recently published Millennium Ecosystem Assessment synthesis report. The analysis utilizes an ecological framework based on "deep ecology" , examining how the discourse of the MA asserts or denies the intrinsic worth of fish. The discursive construction of fish is particularly relevant given the massive expansion of the aquaculture industry, which is having a negative impact on ecosystems and the fish themselves, particularly the Atlantic salmon. (...)
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  45. A. Pablo Iannone (1999). Philosophical Ecologies: Essays in Philosophy, Ecology, and Human Life. Humanity Books.
  46. Roger S. Gottlieb (1996). This Sacred Earth Religion, Nature, Environment.
     
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  47.  6
    Joan Halifax (2004). The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom. Grove Press.
    Grove Press is proud to reissue this important work by one of Buddhism's leading contemporary teachers.
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  48. Bartlomiej Lenart (2010). Enlightened Self-Interest: In Search of the Ecological Self (A Synthesis of Stoicism and Ecosophy). Praxis 2 (2):26-44.
    Arne Neass’ Ecosophy and the Stoic attitude towards environmental ethics are often believed to be incompatible primarily because the first is often understood as championing an ecocentric standpoint while the latter espouses an egocentric (as well as an anthropocentric) view. This paper argues that such incompatibility is rooted in a misunderstanding of both Ecosophy and Stoicism. Moreover, the paper argues that a synthesis of both the Ecosophical and Stoic approaches to environmental concerns results in a robust and satisfying attitude toward (...)
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  49.  6
    Alan R. Drengson (1983). Shifting Paradigms: From Technocrat to Planetary Person. Lightstar Press.
    This essay examines and compares two paradigms of technology, nature, and social life, and their associated environmental impacts. I explore moving from technocratic paradigms to the emerging ecological paradigms of planetary person ecosophies. The dominant technocratic philosophy's guiding policy and technological power is mechanistic. It conceptualizes nature as a resource to be controlled for human ends. Its global practices are drastically altering the integrity of the planet's ecosystems. In contrast, the organic, planetary person approaches respect the intrinsic values of (...)
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  50.  74
    Ariel Kay Salleh (1984). Deeper Than Deep Ecology: The Eco-Feminist Connection. Environmental Ethics 6 (4):339-345.
    I offer a feminist critique of deep ecology as presented in the seminal papers of Naess and Devall. I outline the fundamental premises involved and analyze their internal coherence. Not only are there problems on logical grounds, but the tacit methodological approach of the two papers are inconsistent with the deep ecologists’ own substantive comments. I discuss these shortcomings in terms of a broader feminist critique of patriarchal culture and point out some practical and theoretical contributions which (...)
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