Search results for 'Deep ecology Religious aspects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. David Pepper (1993). Eco-Socialism: From Deep Ecology to Social Justice. Routledge.
    Presents a provocatively anthropocentric analysis of the way forward for green politics and environmental movements, exposing the deficiencies and contradictions of green approaches to post-modern politics and deep ecology. This title available in eBook format. Click here for more information . Visit our eBookstore at: www.ebookstore.tandf.co.uk.
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  2.  6
    Joan Halifax (2004). The Fruitful Darkness: A Journey Through Buddhist Practice and Tribal Wisdom. Grove Press.
    Grove Press is proud to reissue this important work by one of Buddhism's leading contemporary teachers.
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  3.  20
    Robert Sessions (1991). Deep Ecology Versus Ecofeminism: Healthy Differences or Incompatible Philosophies? Hypatia 6 (1):90 - 107.
    Deep ecology and ecofeminism are contemporary environmental philosophies that share the desire to supplant the predominant Western anthropocentric environmental frameworks. Recently thinkers from these movements have focused their critiques on each other, and substantial differences have emerged. This essay explores central aspects of this debate to ascertain whether either philosophy has been undermined in the process and whether there are any indications that they are compatible despite their differences.
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  4. Peter Scott (1997). Ecology: Religious or Secular? Heythrop Journal 38 (1):1–14.
    Ecology: religious or secular?’ addresses the issue of the relation between ecology and the idea of God. ‘Social’ interpretations of ecology seem to fit with traditional Christian models, such as stewardship, for grasping the relation between humanity and nature. ‘Deep’ interpretations of ecology, in which nature is understood to encompass humanity, appear, by contrast, less amenable to assimilation by Christianity.The choice – for so it is often presented – between ‘deep’ and ‘social’ forms (...)
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  5.  1
    Stewart Davidson (2007). The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism. Environmental Values 16 (3):313-332.
    Bioregionalism is often presented as the politics of deep ecology, or deep ecology 's social philosophy. That the ties uniting these doctrines are rarely explored can be put down to a perception amongst commentators that such links are self-evident and therefore unworthy of closer examination. By arguing that the bonds between deep ecology and bioregionalism are more tenuous than has often been assumed, this paper addresses this theoretical lacuna. (...)
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  6.  45
    Susan Power Bratton, P. Clayton & Z. Simpson (2006). Ecology and Religion. In Philip Clayton & Zachory Simpson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford University Press 207-225.
    Accession Number: ATLA0001712129; Hosting Book Page Citation: p 207-225.; Language(s): English; General Note: Bibliography: p 222-225.; Issued by ATLA: 20130825; Publication Type: Essay.
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  7.  64
    Colette Sciberras (2002). Deep Ecology and Ecofeminism: The Self in Environmental Philosophy. Dissertation, Lancaster
    I consider the issue of the self and its relation to the environment, focusing on the accounts given in ecofeminism and deep ecology. Though both stress the relatedness of the human self to nature, these accounts differ in various ways. Ecofeminism stresses the value of personal relations with particular others, whereas deep ecology argues that we should expand our sense of self to include all natural others and the whole of nature. Deep ecology’s views (...)
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  8.  45
    Jozef Keulartz (1998). Struggle for Nature: A Critique of Radical Ecology. Routledge.
    The Struggle for Nature outlines and examines the main aspects of current environmental philosophy including deep ecology, social and political ecology, eco-feminism and eco-anarchism. It criticizes the dependency on science of these philosophies and the social problems engendered by them. Jozef Keulartz argues for a post-naturalistic turn in environmental philosophy. The Struggle for Nature presents the most up-to-date arguments in environmental philosophy, which will be valuable reading for anyone interested in applied philosophy, environmental studies (...)
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  9.  11
    Knut A. Jacobsen (1996). Bhagavadgīt , Ecosophy T, and Deep Ecology. Inquiry 39 (2):219 – 238.
    This article analyses the influence of Hinduism on Ecosophy T. Arne Naess in several of his environmental writings quotes verse 6.29 of the Bhagavadgit?, a Hindu sacred text. The verse is understood to illustrate the close relationship between the ideas of oneness of all living beings, non?injury and self?realization. The article compares the interpretations of the verse of some of the most important Hindu commentators on the Bhagavadgit? with the environmentalist interpretation. There is no agreement in the history of the (...)
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  10. Frederic L. Bender (2003). The Culture of Extinction: Toward a Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Humanity Books.
     
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  11.  38
    Andrew McLaughlin (1993). Regarding Nature: Industrialism and Deep Ecology. State University of New York Press.
    Regarding Nature: A conceptual introduction How should we regard nature? Until recently, this question was decisively answered by the practices of ...
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  12. Eric Katz, Andrew Light & David Rothenberg (2000). Beneath the Surface Critical Essays in the Philosophy of Deep Ecology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  13.  3
    Peter Reed & David Rothenberg (1992). Wisdom in the Open Air: The Norwegian Roots of Deep Ecology. Univ of Minnesota Press.
  14.  36
    Terry Hoy (2000). Toward a Naturalistic Political Theory: Aristotle, Hume, Dewey, Evolutionary Biology, and Deep Ecology. Praeger.
    Hoy seeks to establish a basis for a naturalistic political theory as a continuity from Aristotle through the Enlightenment and Post-Enlightenment contributions ...
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  15.  18
    Laurel Kearns & Catherine Keller (eds.) (2007). Ecospirit: Religions and Philosophies for the Earth. Fordham University Press.
    We hope—even as we doubt—that the environmental crisis can be controlled. Public awareness of our species’ self-destructiveness as material beings in a material world is growing—but so is the destructiveness. The practical interventions needed for saving and restoring the earth will require a collective shift of such magnitude as to take on a spiritual and religious intensity.This transformation has in part already begun. Traditions of ecological theology and ecologically aware religious practice have been preparing the way for decades. (...)
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  16.  13
    Seyyed Hossein Nasr (1996). Religion & the Order of Nature. Oxford University Press.
    The current ecological crisis is a matter of urgent global concern, with solutions being sought on many fronts. In this book, Seyyed Hossein Nasr argues that the devastation of our world has been exacerbated, if not actually caused, by the reductionist view of nature that has been advanced by modern secular science. What is needed, he believes, is the recovery of the truth to which the great, enduring religions all attest; namely that nature is sacred. Nasr traces the historical process (...)
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  17.  17
    John Barry (2007). Environment and Social Theory. Routledge.
    Environment and Social Theory provides a concise introduction to the relationship between the environment and social theory, both historically and within contemporary social theory.
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  18.  44
    Holmes Rolston Iii (2006). Environmental Ethics and Religion/Science. In Oxford Handbook of Religion and Science. Oxford Univ Pr 908--928.
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  19. Louke van Wensveen (2000). Dirty Virtues: The Emergence of Ecological Virtue Ethics. Humanity Books.
  20. Louke van Wensveen (1997). Dirty Virtues. Humanities Press.
  21. Stephen R. L. Clark (1994). How to Think About the Earth. Mowbray.
  22. Henryk Skolimowski (1993). A Sacred Place to Dwell: Living with Reverence Upon the Earth. Element.
  23. Allerd Stikker (1992). The Transformation Factor: Towards an Ecological Consciousness. Element.
     
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  24. Thomas Mary Berry (1998). The Collected Thoughts of Thomas Berry. Center for the Story of the Universe.
    Where are we? -- How did we get here? -- The millennial vision -- Where do we go? -- Psychic energy -- The North American continent -- Governance -- The university -- The corporation -- Religion -- The historical mission of our time.
     
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  25. David M. Gill (1970). From Here to Where? Geneva,World Council of Churches.
     
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  26. Henryk Skolimowski (1991). Dancing Shiva in the Ecological Age. Clarion Books.
  27.  11
    Hans-Dirk van Hoogstraten (2001). Deep Economy: Caring for Ecology, Humanity, and Religion. James Clarke & Co..
    A wide-ranging analysis of the economic world order and its ecological and theological dimensions, this unique and challenging work confronts us with the ...
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  28. Arran Stibbe (2006). Deep Ecology and Language: The Curtailed Journey of the Atlantic Salmon. Society and Animals 14 (1):61-77.
    This article explores the representation of fish in ecological discourse through analysis of the recently published Millennium Ecosystem Assessment synthesis report. The analysis utilizes an ecological framework based on "deep ecology" , examining how the discourse of the MA asserts or denies the intrinsic worth of fish. The discursive construction of fish is particularly relevant given the massive expansion of the aquaculture industry, which is having a negative impact on ecosystems and the fish themselves, particularly the Atlantic salmon. (...)
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  29. Xia Chen, Yun Chen & Jie Chen (eds.) (2010). Dao Jiao Sheng Tai Si Xiang Yan Jiu. Ba Shu Shu She.
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  30. David Oates (2003). Paradise Wild: Reimagining American Nature. Oregon State University Press.
     
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  31.  90
    Arne Naess (1984). A Defence of the Deep Ecology Movement. Environmental Ethics 6 (3):265-270.
    There is an international deep ecology social movement with key terms, slogans, and rhetorical use of language comparable to what we find in other activist “alternative” movements today. Some supporters of the movement partake in academic philosophy and have developed or at least suggested philosophies, “ecosophies,” inspired by the movement. R. A. Watson does not distinguish sufficiently between the movement and the philosophical expressions with academic pretensions. As a result, he falsely concludes that deep ecology implies (...)
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  32.  86
    Ariel Kay Salleh (1984). Deeper Than Deep Ecology: The Eco-Feminist Connection. Environmental Ethics 6 (4):339-345.
    I offer a feminist critique of deep ecology as presented in the seminal papers of Naess and Devall. I outline the fundamental premises involved and analyze their internal coherence. Not only are there problems on logical grounds, but the tacit methodological approach of the two papers are inconsistent with the deep ecologists’ own substantive comments. I discuss these shortcomings in terms of a broader feminist critique of patriarchal culture and point out some practical and theoretical contributions which (...)
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  33.  50
    Jim Cheney (1987). Eco-Feminism and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 9 (2):115-145.
    l examine the degree to which the so-called “deep ecology” movement embodies a feminist sensibility. In part one I take a brief look at the ambivalent attitude of “eco-feminism” toward deep ecology. In part two I show that this ambivalence sterns largely from the fact that deep ecology assimilates feminist insights to a basically masculine ethical orientation. In part three I discuss some of the ways in which deepecology theory might change if it adopted (...)
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  34.  42
    Warwick Fox (1989). The Deep Ecology-Ecofeminism Debate and its Parallels. Environmental Ethics 11 (1):5-25.
    There has recently been considerable discussion of the relative merits of deep ecology and ecofeminism, primarily from an ecofeminist perspective. I argue that the essential ecofeminist charge against deep ecology is that deep ecology focuses on the issue of anthropocentrism (i.e., human-centeredness) rather than androcentrism (i.e., malecenteredness). I point out that this charge is not directed at deep ecology’s positive or constructive task of encouraging an attitude of ecocentric egalitarianism, but rather at (...)
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  35.  46
    Harold Glasser (1996). Naess's Deep Ecology Approach and Environmental Policy. Inquiry 39 (2):157 – 187.
    A clarification of Naess's ?depth metaphor? is offered. The relationship between Naess's empirical semantics and communication theory and his deep ecology approach to ecophilosophy (DEA) is developed. Naess's efforts to highlight significant conflicts by eliminating misunderstandings and promoting deep problematizing are focused upon. These insights are used to develop the implications of the DEA for environmental policy. Naess's efforts to promote the integration of science, ethics, and politics are related to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The (...)
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  36.  26
    Benjamin Howe (2010). Was Arne Naess Recognized as the Founder of Deep Ecology Prematurely? Semantics and Environmental Philosophy. Environmental Ethics 32 (4):369-383.
    According to Arne Naess, his environmental philosophy is influenced by the philosophy of language called empirical semantics, which he first developed in the 1930s as a participant in the seminars of the Vienna Circle. While no one denies his claim, most of his commentators defend views about his environmental philosophy that contradict the tenets of his semantics. In particular, they argue that he holds that deep ecology’s supporters share a world view, and that the movement’s platform articulates shared (...)
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  37.  24
    Deborah Slicer (1995). Is There an Ecofeminism–Deep Ecology “Debate”? Environmental Ethics 17 (2):151-169.
    I discuss six problems with Warwick Fox’s “The Deep Ecology–Ecofeminism Debate and Its Parallels” and conclude that until Fox and some other deep ecologists take the time to study feminism and ecofeminist analyses, only disputes—not genuine debate—will occur between these two parties. An understanding of the six issues that I discuss is a precondition for such a debate.
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  38.  35
    Deane Curtin (1994). Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self. Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I (...)
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  39.  47
    Ariel Salleh (1992). The Ecofeminism/Deep Ecology Debate. Environmental Ethics 14 (3):195-216.
    I discuss conceptual confusions shared by deep ecologists over such questions as gender, essentialism, normative dualism, and eco-centrism. I conclude that deep ecologists have failed to grasp both the epistemological challenge offered by ecofeminism and the practical labor involved in bringing about social change. While convergencies between deep ecology and ecofeminism promise to be fruitful, these are celebrated in false consciousness, unless remedial work is done.
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  40.  29
    Simon P. James (2000). “Thing-Centered” Holism in Buddhism, Heidegger, and Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 22 (4):359-375.
    I address the problem of reconciling environmental holism with the intrinsic value of individual beings. Drawing upon Madhyamaka Buddhism, the later philosophy of Martin Heidegger, and deep ecology, I present a distinctly holistic conception of nature that, nevertheless, retains a commitment to the intrinsic worth of individual beings. I conclude with an examination of the practical implications of this “thing-centered holism” for environmental ethics.
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  41.  26
    Mick Smith (1999). To Speak of Trees: Social Constructivism, Environmental Values, and the Future of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 21 (4):359-376.
    The power and the promise of deep ecology is seen, by its supporters and detractors alike, to lie in its claims to speak on behalf of a natural world threatened by human excesses. Yet, to speak of trees as trees or nature as something worthy of respect in itself has appeared increasingly difficult in the light of social constructivist accounts of “nature.” Deep ecology has been loath to take constructivism’s insightsseriously, retreating into forms of biological objectivism (...)
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  42.  23
    Frank B. Golley (1987). Deep Ecology From the Perspective of Environmental Science. Environmental Ethics 9 (1):45-55.
    Deep ecology is examined from the perspective of scientific ecology. Two norms, self-realization and biocentric equality, are considered central to deep ecology, and are explored in brief. Concepts of scientific ecology that seem to form a bridge to these norms are ecological hierarchical organization, the exchange of energy, material and information, and the development of species within ecosystems and the biosphere. While semantic problems exist, conceptually it appears that deep ecology norms can (...)
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  43.  10
    Eric H. Reitan (1996). Deep Ecology and the Irrelevance of Morality. Environmental Ethics 18 (4):411-424.
    Both Arne Naess and Warwick Fox have argued that deep ecology, in terms of “Selfrealization,” is essentially nonmoral. I argue that the attainment of the ecological Self does not render morality in the richest sense “superfluous,” as Fox suggests. To the contrary, the achievement of the ecological Self is a precondition for being a truly moral person, both from the perspective of a robust Kantian moral frameworkand from the perspective of Aristotelian virtue ethics. The opposition between selfregard and (...)
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  44.  9
    Harold Glasser (1997). On Warwick Fox's Assessment of Deep Ecology. Environmental Ethics 19 (1):69-85.
    I examine Fox’s tripartite characterization of deep ecology. His assessment abandons Naess’s emphasis upon the pluralism of ultimate norms by distilling what I refer to as the deep ecology approach to “Self-realization!” Contrary to Fox, I argue that his popular sense is distinctive and his formal sense is tenable. Fox’s philosophical sense, while distinctive, is neither necessary nor sufficient to adequately characterize the deep ecology approach. I contend that the deep ecology approach, (...)
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  45.  28
    Ariel Salleh (1992). The Ecofeminism/Deep Ecology Debate. Environmental Ethics 14 (3):195-216.
    I discuss conceptual confusions shared by deep ecologists over such questions as gender, essentialism, normative dualism, and eco-centrism. I conclude that deep ecologists have failed to grasp both the epistemological challenge offered by ecofeminism and the practical labor involved in bringing about social change. While convergencies between deep ecology and ecofeminism promise to be fruitful, these are celebrated in false consciousness, unless remedial work is done.
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  46.  15
    Freya Mathews (1988). Conservation and Self-Realization: A Deep Ecology Perspective. Environmental Ethics 10 (4):347-355.
    Nature in its wider cosmic sense is not at risk from human exploitation and predation. To see life on Earth as but a local manifestation of this wider, indestructable and inexhaustible nature is to shield ourselves from despair over the fate of our Earth. But to take this wide view also appears to make interventionist political action on behalf of nature-which is to say, conservation-superfluous. If we identify with nature in its widest sense, as deep ecology prescribes, then (...)
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  47.  36
    Michael E. Zimmerman (1993). Rethinking the Heidegger-Deep Ecology Relationship. Environmental Ethics 15 (3):195-224.
    Recent disclosures regarding the relationship between Heidegger’s thought and his own version of National Socialism have led me to rethink my earlier efforts to portray Heidegger as a forerunner of deep ecology. His political problems have provided ammunition for critics, such as Murray Bookchin, who regard deep ecology as a reactionary movement. In this essay, I argue that, despite some similarities, Heidegger’s thought and deep ecology are in many ways incompatible, in part because (...) ecologists—in spite of their criticism of the ecologically destructive character of technological modernity—generally support a “progressive” idea of human evolution. (shrink)
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  48.  3
    Magdalena Holy-Luczaj (2015). Heidegger's Support for Deep Ecology Reexamined Once Again: Ontological Egalitarianism, or Farewell to the Great Chain of Being. Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):45-66.
    It is said an attempt to reconcile Heidegger's ontology with the position of deep ecology finds the going rugged. Yet, I believe it is worth hiking this path once again to reexamine the connections between deep ecology and the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. Significantly, we will see the importance of Heidegger's critique of the idea of the great chain of being.Taking the perspective of deep ecology requires us to consider whether Heidegger's being-centered approach can (...)
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  49.  30
    William Aiken (1994). Is Deep Ecology Too Radical? Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (4):1-5.
    The theory of Deep Ecology is characterized as having two essential features: the belief that nature is inherently valuable, and the belief that one’s self is truly realized by identification with nature. Four common but different meanings of the term “radical” are presented. Whether the theory of Deep Ecology is “too radical” depends upon which of these meanings one is using.
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  50.  38
    Harold Glasser (2011). Naess's Deep Ecology: Implications for the Human Prospect and Challenges for the Future. Inquiry 54 (1):52-77.
    What sets Naess's deep ecology apart from most inquiries into environmental philosophy is that it does not seek a radical shift in fundamental values. Naess offered a utopian, life-affirming grand narrative, a new Weltanschauung that shifted the focus of inquiry to coupling values, knowledge, understanding, and wisdom to behavior. The core of Naess's approach is that sustainability hinges on developing more thoroughly reasoned and consistent views, policies, and actions, which are tied back to wide-identifying ultimate norms and a (...)
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