Search results for 'Deference' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kimberley Brownlee (2008). Legal Obligation as a Duty of Deference. Law and Philosophy 27 (6):583 - 597.score: 24.0
    An enduring question in political and legal philosophy concerns whether we have a general moral obligation to follow the law. In this paper, I argue that Philip Soper’s intuitively appealing effort to give new life to the idea of legal obligation by characterising it as a duty of deference is ultimately unpersuasive. Soper claims that people who understand what a legal system is and admit that it is valuable must recognise that they would be morally inconsistent to deny that (...)
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  2. Jules Holroyd (2010). Substantively Constrained Choice and Deference. Journal of Moral Philosophy 7 (2):180-199.score: 24.0
    Substantive accounts of autonomy place value constraints on the objects of autonomous choice. According to such views, not all sober and competent choices can be autonomous: some things simply cannot be autonomously chosen. Such an account is developed and appealed to, by Thomas Hill Jr, in order to explain the intuitively troubling nature of choices for deferential roles. Such choices are not consistent with the value of self-respect, it is claimed. In this paper I argue that Hill's attempt to explain (...)
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  3. Andrea C. Westlund (2013). Deference as a Normative Power. Philosophical Studies 166 (3):455-474.score: 24.0
    Much of the literature on practical authority concerns the authority of the state over its subjects—authority to which we are, as G. E. M. Anscombe says, subject “willy nilly”. Yet many of our “willy” (or voluntary) relationships also seem to involve the exercise of practical authority, and this species of authority is in some ways even more puzzling than authority willy nilly. In this paper I argue that voluntary authority relies on a form of voluntary obligation that is akin (in (...)
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  4. Aaron Stalnaker (2013). Confucianism, Democracy, and the Virtue of Deference. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):441-459.score: 24.0
    Some democratic theorists have argued that contemporary people should practice only a civility that recognizes others as equal persons, and eschew any form of deference to authority as a feudalistic cultural holdover that ought to be abandoned in the modern era. Against such views, this essay engages early Confucian views of ethics and society, including their analyses of different sorts of authority and status, in order to argue that, properly understood, deference is indeed a virtue of considerable importance (...)
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  5. David Enoch, Moral Deference.score: 24.0
    Everyone agrees, I think, that there is something fishy about moral deference and expertise, but that's where consensus ends. This paper has two aims – the first is to mount a defense of moral deference, and the second is to offer a (non-debunking) diagnosis of its fishiness. I defend moral deference by connecting the discussion of moral deference to the recent discussion of the appropriate response to uncertainty. It is, I argue, morally obligatory to minimize the (...)
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  6. Henry Jackman (2005). Temporal Externalism, Deference, and Our Ordinary Linguistic Practice. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 86 (3):365-380.score: 21.0
    Temporal externalists argue that ascriptions of thought and utterance content can legitimately reflect contingent conceptual developments that are only settled after the time of utterance. While the view has been criticized for failing to accord with our.
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  7. Pádraig Hogan (2003). Difference and Deference in the Tenor of Learning. Studies in Philosophy and Education 22 (3/4):281-293.score: 21.0
    The critical resources furnished bydeconstruction have more than occasionally beenturned with negative effect on traditional andmore recent conceptions of liberal learning,including the reaffirmation of the humanitiesassociated with philosophical hermeneutics. Thefirst two sections of the paper review thecontrasting and mutually opposed stancestowards learning represented by earlyformulations of deconstruction and ofhermeneutics. An exploration is thenundertaken in the later sections ofdevelopments that have taken place in bothdeconstruction and hermeneutics since theDerrida-Gadamer encounter in Paris in 1981.While not in any sense assimilatinghermeneutics to deconstruction or (...)
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  8. Peter Carrier (2012). Fear and Deference in Holocaust Education. The Pitfalls of “Engagement Teaching” According to a Report by the British Historical Association. Human Affairs 22 (1):43-55.score: 21.0
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  9. Mark Greenberg, Incomplete Understanding, Deference, and the Content of Thought.score: 18.0
    Tyler Burge’s influential arguments have convinced most philosophers that a thinker can have a thought involving a particular concept without fully grasping or having mastery of that concept. In Burge’s (1979) famous example, a thinker who lacks mastery of the concept of arthritis nonetheless has thoughts involving that concept. It is generally supposed, however, that this phenomenon – incomplete understanding, for short – does not require us to reconsider in a fundamental way what it is for a thought to involve (...)
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  10. David Enoch, A Defense of Moral Deference.score: 18.0
    The combination of this vindication of moral deference and diagnosis of its fishiness nicely accommodates, I argue, some related phenomena, like the (neglected) fact that our uneasiness with moral deference is actually a particular instance of uneasiness with opaque evidence in general when it comes to morality, and the (familiar) fact that the scope of this uneasiness is wider than the moral as it includes other normative domains.
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  11. Antonio Rauti (2010). How Use Theories of Meaning Can Accommodate Shared Meanings: A Modal Account of Semantic Deference. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):285-303.score: 18.0
    Use theories of meaning (UTMs) seem ill-equipped to accommodate the intuition that ignorant but deferential speakers use natural kind terms (e.g. 'zinc') and technical expression (e.g. 'credit default swap') with the same meanings as the experts do. After all, their use deviates from the experts', and if use determines meaning, a deviant use ordinarily would determine a deviant meaning. Yet the intuition is plausible and advocates of UTMs believe it can be accommodated. I examine Gilbert Harman's and Paul Horwich's views, (...)
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  12. Antonio Rauti (2012). Multiple Groundings and Deference. Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):317-336.score: 18.0
    The idea that reference is multiply grounded allows causal-historical theories of reference to account for reference change. It also threatens the stability of reference in light of widespread error and confusion. I describe the problem, so far unrecognised, and provide a solution based on the phenomenon of semantic deference, which I differentiate from reference-borrowing. I conclude that deference has an authentic foundational semantic role to play.
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  13. Diego Marconi (2012). Semantic Normativity, Deference and Reference. Dialectica 66 (2):273-287.score: 18.0
    I discuss Paolo Casalegno's objections to my views about semantic normativity as presented in my book Lexical Competence (MIT Press, 1997) and in a later paper. I argue that, contrary to Casalegno's claim, the phenomenon of semantic deference can be accounted for without having to appeal to an “objective” notion of reference, i.e. to the view that words have the reference they have independently of whatever knowledge or ability is available to or within the linguistic community. Against both Casalegno (...)
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  14. Richard Horsey (2000). Meaning Postulates and Deference. Philosophical Explorations.score: 18.0
    Fodor (1998) argues that most lexical concepts have no internal structure. He rejects what he calls Inferential Role Semantics (IRS), the view that primitive concepts are constituted by their inferential relations, on the grounds that this violates the compositionality constraint and leads to an unacceptable form of holism. In rejecting IRS, Fodor must also reject meaning postulates. I argue, contra Fodor, that meaning postulates must be retained, but that when suitably constrained they are not susceptible to his arguments against IRS. (...)
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  15. Barry Smith (1991). Textual Deference. American Philosophical Quarterly 28 (1):1 - 12.score: 18.0
    It is a truism that the attitude of deference to the text plays a lesser role in Anglo-Saxon philosophy than in other philosophical traditions. Works of philosophy written in English have, it is true, spawned a massive secondary literature dealing with the ideas, problems or arguments they contain. But they have almost never given rise to works of commentary in the strict sense, a genre which is however a dominant literary form not only in the Confucian, Vedantic, Islamic, Jewish (...)
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  16. Philip Soper (2002). The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    Do citizens have an obligation to obey the law? This book differs from standard approaches by shifting from the language of obedience (orders) to that of deference (normative judgments). The popular view that law claims authority but does not have it is here reversed on both counts: Law does not claim authority but has it. Though the focus is on political obligation, the author approaches that issue indirectly by first developing a more general account of when deference is (...)
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  17. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (forthcoming). Procedural Justice and the Problem of Intellectual Deference. Episteme.score: 18.0
    It is a well-established fact that we tend to underestimate our susceptibility to cognitive bias on account of overconfidence, and thereby often fail to listen to intellectual advice aimed at reducing such bias. This is the problem of intellectual deference. The present paper considers this problem in contexts where educators attempt to teach students how to avoid bias for purposes of instilling epistemic virtues. It is argued that recent research in social psychology suggests that we can come to terms (...)
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  18. Sor-Hoon Tan (2012). Ritual and Deference: Extending Chinese Philosophy in a Comparative Context. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):131-134.score: 18.0
    The twelve elegant essays in this slim volume by Robert Cummings Neville, Ritual and Deference: Extending Chinese Philosophy in a Comparative Context, originating in lectures and projects of varying purposes, crystallize Neville’s “Confucian program” of comparative philosophy, which has been taking shape in his earlier works. More accessible than his other monographs, its apparent simplicity is deceptive. While it would inspire and benefit even the novice, only those who have traveled some distance on the same arduous journey would fully (...)
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  19. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (forthcoming). People Listen to People Who Listen: Instilling Virtues of Deference. In Christian Miller (ed.), The Character Project: New Perspectives in Psychology, Philosophy, and Theology. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    We often fail to defer to sources who know what they’re talking about. When doing so consistently, we fail to manifest a virtue of deference. This is because epistemic virtues are dispositions that promote epistemic goals, and knowledge is an epistemic goal. The present paper makes two points about how to instill this virtue. First, virtues of deference can be instilled by promoting compliance with requests on the part of good sources to be listened to, since listening is (...)
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  20. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij, The Social Virtue of Blind Deference.score: 18.0
    Recently, it has become popular to account for knowledge and other epistemic states in terms of epistemic virtues. The present paper focuses on an epistemic virtue relevant when deferring to others in testimonial contexts. It is argued that, while many virtue epistemologists will accept that epistemic virtue can be exhibited in cases involving epistemically motivated hearers, carefully vetting their testimonial sources for signs of untrustworthiness prior to deferring, anyone who accepts that also has to accept that an agent may exhibit (...)
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  21. Alison L. Young (2010). Deference, Dialogue and the Search for Legitimacy. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (4):815-831.score: 18.0
    This review article discusses the relationship between deference and the presumption of constitutionality, as discussed in Brian Foley’s book, Deference and the Presumption of Constitutionality. Foley argues for the rejection of the presumption of constitutionality as it operates in the Irish Constitution, proposing instead a ‘due deference’ approach. This approach would require courts to give varying degrees of weight to the legislature’s conclusions that particular legislative provisions are constitutional. The article praises Foley’s book, particularly its stronger justification (...)
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  22. Stacie Friend & Peter Ludlow (2003). Disagreement and Deference: Is Diversity of Opinion a Precondition for Thought? Philosophical Perspectives 17 (1):115–139.score: 15.0
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  23. Christopher Gauker (2007). The Circle of Deference Proves the Normativity of Semantics. Rivista di Estetica 34 (34):181-198.score: 15.0
    The question whether semantics is a normative discipline can be formulated as a question about the meaning of the word “means”. If I assert, “The word ‘gatto’ in Italian means cat,” what have I done? The naturalist about meaning claims that I have asserted that a certain natural relation obtains between Italian speakers’ tokens of “gatto” and cats. Or at least, I have asserted something about the way Italian speakers use the word “gatto”, which way presumably has something to do (...)
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  24. Andrea C. Westlund (2003). Selflessness and Responsibility for Self: Is Deference Compatible with Autonomy? Philosophical Review 112 (4):483-523.score: 15.0
    She was intensely sympathetic. She was immensely charming. She excelled in the difficult arts of family life. She sacrificed herself daily. If there was chicken, she took the leg, if there was a draught, she sat in it—in short, she was so constituted that she never had a mind or wish of her own, but preferred to sympathise always with the minds and wishes of others. — Virginia Woolf (1979, 59).
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  25. Robert J. Howell (2014). Google Morals, Virtue, and the Asymmetry of Deference. Noûs 48 (3):389-415.score: 15.0
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  26. James M. Joyce (2007). Epistemic Deference: The Case of Chance. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (2):187 - 206.score: 15.0
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  27. Gabriel Segal, In Deference to Reference.score: 15.0
    of (from Philosophy Dissertations Online).
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  28. Kimberley Brownlee (2004). Obedience, Conformity, and Deference. Res Publica 10 (3):267-274.score: 15.0
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  29. Henry Jackman (2000). Deference and Self-Knowledge. Southwest Philosophy Review 16 (1):171-180.score: 15.0
    It has become increasingly popular to suggest that non-individualistic theories of content undermine our purported a priori knowledge of such contents because they entail that we lack the ability to distinguish our thoughts from alternative thoughts with different contents. However, problems relating to such knowledge of 'comparative' content tell just as much against individualism as non-individualism. Indeed, the problems presented by individualistic theories of content for self-knowledge are at least, if not more, serious than those presented by non-individualistic theories. Consequently, (...)
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  30. Marcia Baron (1985). Servility, Critical Deference and the Deferential Wife. Philosophical Studies 48 (3):393 - 400.score: 15.0
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  31. Leslie Green (2003). Review of Philip Soper, The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (4).score: 15.0
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  32. Andrew Woodfield (2000). Reference and Deference. Mind and Language 15 (4):433–451.score: 15.0
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  33. Christopher Heath Wellman (2005). Philip Soper, The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals:The Ethics of Deference: Learning From Law's Morals. Ethics 116 (1):255-259.score: 15.0
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  34. Michael Devitt, Deference and the Use Theory.score: 15.0
    My paper is a response to Paul Horwich’s Reflections on Meaning (2005) chapter 2, “A Use Theory of Meaning”, which develops a theory, “UTM”, presented in Meaning (1998), and responds to some criticisms, including mine in “Meaning and Use” (2002).
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  35. Stephen R. L. Clark (2005). Deference, Degree and Selfhood. Philosophy 80 (2):249-260.score: 15.0
    The world we lost, and now barely understand, was one where everyone knew her place, and her attendant duties. Civilized groups were the likeliest to insist on a diversity of rôle and rule. Primitive societies are ones where there are rather fewer such distinctions. Slaves and merchants offered a way of being outside the orders, and from the older point of view, the life of slaves and merchants is exactly what the ‘liberal’ ideal entails. No one can count on her (...)
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  36. W. E. Coopr (1976). Gricean Deference. Metaphilosophy 7 (2):91–101.score: 15.0
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  37. Susan L. Hurley (2007). Neural Dominance, Neural Deference, and Sensorimotor Dynamics. In M. Velmans (ed.), Encyclopedia of Consciousness. Blackwell. 640--656.score: 15.0
    Why is neural activity in a particular area expressed as experience of red rather than green, or as visual experience rather than auditory? Indeed, why does it have any conscious expression at all? These familiar questions indicate the explanatory gap between neural activity and ‘what it’s like’-- qualities of conscious experience. The comparative explanatory gaps, intermodal and intramodal, can be separated from the absolute explanatory gap and associated zombie issues--why does neural activity have any conscious expression at all?. Here I (...)
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  38. S. Godlovitch (1988). Aging and Moral Deference. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (2):55-61.score: 15.0
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  39. Avery Kolers (2005). Justice and the Politics of Deference. Journal of Political Philosophy 13 (2):153–173.score: 15.0
  40. Thaddeus Mason Pope (2010). The Case of Samuel Golubchuk: The Dangers of Judicial Deference and Medical Self-Regulation. American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):59-61.score: 15.0
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  41. Torben Spaak (2006). Philip Soper, the Ethics of Deference Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Law, Cambridge University Press, 2002, 189 Pages, Isbn 0-521-81047-. [REVIEW] Theoria 72 (2):138-147.score: 15.0
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  42. Howard Richards (1964). Deference. Ethics 74 (2):135-142.score: 15.0
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  43. Stephen R. Yarbrough (1987). Differance, Deference, and the Question of Proper Reading. Man and World 20 (3):257-282.score: 15.0
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  44. Edward E. Hollowell (1983). Decisions About Hospital Staff Privileges: A Case for Judicial Deference. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (3):118-120.score: 15.0
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  45. James M. Joyce (2007). ``Epistemic Deference: The Case of Chance&Quot. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 107 (1pt2):187-206.score: 15.0
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  46. Laurence Thomas (1993). Moral Deference. Philosophical Forum 24 (1-3):232-250.score: 15.0
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  47. Frank Keil (2005). Doubt, Deference, and Deliberation: Understanding and Using the Division of Cognitive Labour. In Tamar Szabo Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Oxford Studies in Epistemology Volume 1. Oup Oxford. 143.score: 15.0
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  48. Michael McDonald (1981). Edgar Z. Friedenberg, Deference to Authority: The Case of Canada Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 1 (2/3):72-74.score: 15.0
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  49. George S. Pappas (2000). Epistemic Deference. Acta Analytica 24:113-126.score: 15.0
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  50. A. L. Young (2014). Will You, Won't You, Will You Join the Deference Dance? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 34 (2):375-394.score: 15.0
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