Search results for 'Deliberative democracy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Anwar Tlili & Emily Dawson (2010). Mediating Science and Society in the EU and UK: From Information-Transmission to Deliberative Democracy? Minerva 48 (4):429-461.score: 240.0
    In this paper we critically review recent developments in policies, practices and philosophies pertaining to the mediation between science and the public within the EU and the UK, focusing in particular on the current paradigm of Public Understanding of Science and Technology (PEST) which seeks to depart from the science information-transmission associated with previous paradigms, and enact a deliberative democracy model. We first outline the features of the current crisis in democracy and discuss deliberative democracy (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Bashir Bashir (2012). Reconciling Historical Injustices: Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation. [REVIEW] Res Publica 18 (2):127-143.score: 240.0
    Deliberative democracy is often celebrated and endorsed because of its promise to include, empower, and emancipate otherwise oppressed and excluded social groups through securing their voice and granting them impact in reasoned public deliberation. This article explores the ability of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy to accommodate the demands of historically excluded social groups in democratic plural societies. It argues that the inclusive, transformative, and empowering potential of Habermas’ theory of deliberative democracy falters when (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. John O'Neill (2002). The Rhetoric of Deliberation: Some Problems in Kantian Theories of Deliberative Democracy. Res Publica 8 (3):249-268.score: 240.0
    Deliberative or discursive models of democracy have recently enjoyed a revival in both political theory and policy practice. Against the picture of democracy as a procedure for aggregating and effectively meeting the given preference of individuals, deliberative theory offers a model of democracy as a forum through which judgements and preferences are formed and altered through reasoned dialogue between free and equal citizens. Much in the recent revival of deliberative democracy, especially that which (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Christian List & John Dryzek (2003). Social Choice Theory and Deliberative Democracy: A Reconciliation. British Journal of Political Science 33 (1):1-28.score: 240.0
    The two most influential traditions of contemporary theorizing about democracy, social choice theory and deliberative democracy, are generally thought to be at loggerheads, in that the former demonstrates the impossibility, instability or meaninglessness of the rational collective outcomes sought by the latter. We argue that the two traditions can be reconciled. After expounding the central Arrow and Gibbard-Satterthwaite impossibility results, we reassess their implications, identifying the conditions under which meaningful democratic decision making is possible. We argue that (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Kristian Skagen Ekeli (2005). Giving a Voice to Posterity – Deliberative Democracy and Representation of Future People. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 18 (5):429-450.score: 240.0
    The aim of this paper is to consider whether some seats in a democratically elected legislative assembly ought to be reserved for representatives of future generations. In order to examine this question, I will propose a new democratic model for representing posterity. It is argued that this model has several advantages compared with a model for the democratic representation of future people previously suggested by Andrew Dobson. Nevertheless, the democratic model that I propose confronts at least two difficult problems. First, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Martyn Griffin (2012). Deliberative Democracy and Emotional Intelligence: An Internal Mechanism to Regulate the Emotions. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 31 (6):517-538.score: 240.0
    Deliberative democracy, it is claimed, is essential for the legitimisation of public policy and law. It is built upon an assumption that citizens will be capable of constructing and defending reasons for their moral and political beliefs. However, critics of deliberative democracy suggest that citizens’ emotions are not properly considered in this process and, if left unconsidered, present a serious problem for this political framework. In response to this, deliberative theorists have increasingly begun to incorporate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Associo-Deliberative Democracy (2001). Piotr perczynski. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4:71.score: 240.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. On Freedom & Deliberative Democracy (2005). Moving Preferences and Sites in Democratic Life. Political Theory 33 (3):370-396.score: 240.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Graham Smith (2003). Deliberative Democracy and the Environment. Routledge.score: 216.0
    One of the key questions to have exercised green political theorists in recent years concerns the relationship of the environment 'agenda' and democracy. Both environmentalists and democrats have a tendency to think of each other as natural bedfellows but in fact there is little theoretical or practical reason why they should be. Indeed some theorists have argued that the environmental movement has grown from fundamentally authoritarian roots and it is arguable that the only really effective way of implementing environmental (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Duncan Ivison, Deliberative Democracy and the Politics of Reconciliation.score: 216.0
    The problem of historical injustice presents a deep challenge to the aspirations of deliberative democrats, especially to those “deliberative activists” who seek to advance deliberation in deeply unjust circumstances (Fung 2005, 399). But the debate over historical injustice can itself benefi t from taking a “democratic turn.” Much of the literature is dominated by arguments over historical entitlement theories of justice or by a legalistic focus on the possibilities for compensation and reparation.1 That much of it is deeply (...)
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Elsa González, José Felix Lozano & Pedro Jesús Pérez (2009). Beyond the Conflict: Religion in the Public Sphere and Deliberative Democracy. Res Publica 15 (3):251-267.score: 210.0
    Traditionally, liberals have confined religion to the sphere of the ‘private’ or ‘non-political’. However, recent debates over the place of religious symbols in public spaces, state financing of faith schools, and tax relief for religious organisations suggest that this distinction is not particularly useful in easing the tension between liberal commitments to equality on the one hand, and freedom of religion on the other. This article deals with one aspect of this debate, which concerns whether members of religious communities should (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Kenneth Baynes (2010). Deliberative Democracy and Public Reason. Veritas 55 (1).score: 210.0
    O artigo reexamina as concepções habermasianas de política deliberativa e democracia procedimental à luz de outras teorias deliberativas, de forma a explorar as suas semelhanças e diferenças e investigar o quanto devem à ideia de razão pública e as implicações práticas daquela ideia.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Sheron Fraser-Burgess (2011). Group Identity, Deliberative Democracy and Diversity in Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):480-499.score: 210.0
    Democratic deliberation places the burden of self-governance on its citizens to provide mutual justifying reasons (Gutmann & Thompson, 1996). This article concerns the limiting effect that group identity has on the efficacy of democratic deliberation for equality in education. Under conditions of a powerful majority, deliberation can be repressive and discriminatory. Issues of white flight and race-based admissions serve to illustrate the bias of which deliberation is capable when it fails to substantively take group identity into account. As forms of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Property-Owning Democracy (2012). Part One Property-Owning Democracy. In T. Williamson (ed.), Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond. Wiley-Blackwell. 15.score: 210.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Željko Mančić (2012). Deliberative Democracy and the Internet: Could Online Deliberative Democracy Replace Classical Democracy. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (2):168-186.score: 210.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Vanja Savić (2012). Integration of Deliberative Democracy and Policy-Making: A Vision of a Deliberative System. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (4):170-189.score: 210.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ian Budge (1996). Bytes That Bite: The Internet and Deliberative Democracy. Constellations 4 (2):248-263.score: 210.0
  18. Property-Owning Democracy (2012). Toward a Practical Politics of Property-Owning Democracy: Program and Politics. In T. Williamson (ed.), Property-Owning Democracy: Rawls and Beyond. Wiley-Blackwell. 223.score: 210.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Branislav Dolný (2011). Possible Application of Deliberative Democracy in Parliament. Human Affairs 21 (4):422-436.score: 210.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Ivana Jankovic (2012). Deliberative Democracy and the Problem of It's Practical Implementation. Filozofija I Društvo 23 (2):187-202.score: 210.0
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Xiaosheng Wang (2009). Shang Tan Dao de Yu Shang Yi Min Zhu: Habeimasi Zheng Zhi Lun Li Si Xiang Yan Jiu = Discoursive Moral and Deliberative Democracy: On Jürgen Habermas's Thought of Ethics and Politics. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She.score: 210.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Christian List, Robert C. Luskin, James S. Fishkin & Iain McLean (2013). Deliberation, Single-Peakedness, and the Possibility of Meaningful Democracy: Evidence From Deliberative Polls. Journal of Politics 75 (1):80–95.score: 204.0
    Majority cycling and related social choice paradoxes are often thought to threaten the meaningfulness of democracy. But deliberation can prevent majority cycles – not by inducing unanimity, which is unrealistic, but by bringing preferences closer to single-peakedness. We present the first empirical test of this hypothesis, using data from Deliberative Polls. Comparing preferences before and after deliberation, we find increases in proximity to single-peakedness. The increases are greater for lower versus higher salience issues and for individuals who seem (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. James Bohman (2006). Deliberative Democracy and the Epistemic Benefits of Diversity. Episteme 3 (3):175-191.score: 180.0
    It is often assumed that democracies can make good use of the epistemic benefi ts of diversity among their citizenry, but difficult to show why this is the case. In a deliberative democracy, epistemically relevant diversity has three aspects: the diversity of opinions, values, and perspectives. Deliberative democrats generally argue for an epistemic form of Rawls' difference principle: that good deliberative practice ought to maximize deliberative inputs, whatever they are, so as to benefi t all (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Chantal Mouffe (1999). Deliberative Democracy or Agonistic Pluralism? Social Research 66 (3):745-758.score: 180.0
    One of the main reasons that liberal democratic societies are not ill-prepared to confront the present challenge presented by disaffection with democratic institutions, is that the type of political theory currently in vogue is dominated by an individualistic, universalistic, and rationalistic framework. This erases the dimension of the political and impedes envisaging in an adequate manner the nature of a pluralistic democratic public sphere. This paper examines the most recent paradigm of liberal democracy: 'deliberative democracy', in order (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (2012). Why Deliberative Democracy is (Still) Untenable. Public Affairs Quarterly 26 (3):199-220.score: 180.0
    A common objection to deliberative democracy is that available evidence on public ignorance makes it unlikely that social deliberation among the public is a process likely to yield accurate outputs. The present paper considers—and ultimately rejects—two responses to this objection. The first response is that the correct conclusion to draw from the evidence is simply that we must work harder to ensure that the deliberative process improves the deliberators’ epistemic situation. The main problem for this response is (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Mason Richey (2012). Motivated Reasoning in Political Information Processing: The Death Knell of Deliberative Democracy? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (4):511-542.score: 180.0
    In this article I discuss what motivated reasoning research tells us about the prospects for deliberative democracy. In section (I) I introduce the results of several political psychology studies examining the problematic affective and cognitive processing of political information by individuals in non-deliberative, experimental environments. This is useful because these studies are often neglected in political philosophy literature. Section (II) has three stages. First (IIi), I sketch how the study results from section (I) question the practical viability (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Philip Pettit (2001). Deliberative Democracy and the Discursive Dilemma. Noûs 35 (s1):268-299.score: 180.0
    Taken as a model for how groups should make collective judgments and decisions, the ideal of deliberative democracy is inherently ambiguous. Consider the idealised case where it is agreed on all sides that a certain conclusion should be endorsed if and only if certain premises are admitted. Does deliberative democracy recommend that members of the group debate the premises and then individually vote, in the light of that debate, on whether or not to support the conclusion? (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Thom Brooks (2009). A Critique of Pragmatism and Deliberative Democracy. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 45 (1):pp. 50-54.score: 180.0
    This paper offers two potential worries in Robert B. Talisse's A Pragmatist Philosophy of Democracy. The first worry is that is that the picture of democracy on offer is incomplete. While Talisse correctly argues that democracy is about more than elections, democracy is also about more than deliberation between citizens. Talisse's deliberative democracy is problematic to the degree its view of deliberation fails to account for democracy. The second worry we may have concerns (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Daniel P. Sulmasy (2009). Deliberative Democracy and Stem Cell Research in New York State: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (1):pp. 63-78.score: 180.0
    Many states in the U.S. have adopted policies regarding human embryonic stem cell (hESC) research in the last few years. Some have arrived at these policies through legislative debate, some by referendum, and some by executive order. New York has chosen a unique structure for addressing policy decisions regarding this morally controversial issue by creating the Empire State Stem Cell Board with two Committees—an Ethics Committee and a Funding Committee. This essay explores the pros and cons of various policy arrangements (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Cheryl Ann Hall (2007). Recognizing the Passion in Deliberation: Toward a More Democratic Theory of Deliberative Democracy. Hypatia 22 (4):81-95.score: 180.0
    : Critics have suggested that deliberative democracy reproduces inequalities of gender, race, and class by privileging calm rational discussion over passionate speech and action. Their solution is to supplement deliberation with such forms of emotional expression. Hall argues that deliberation already inherently involves passion, a point that is especially important to recognize in order to deconstruct the dichotomy between reason and passion that plays a central role in reinforcing inequalities of gender, race, and class in the first place.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Alison Kadlec (0040). Critical Pragmatism and Deliberative Democracy. Theoria (=117;User_Persona=false;ord=1234):54-80.score: 180.0
    In this article I argue for a model of Deweyan 'critical pragmatism' as a therapeutic alternative to traditional models of deliberative democracy that have been crippled by their inheritance of the threadbare liberal/communitarian debate. By orienting my discussion here with respect to the most serious radical democratic challenges to deliberative democracy, I hope to show how Deweyan critical pragmatism may help us develop new approaches to the theory and practice of deliberation that are both more attuned (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Charles Blattberg (2003). Patriotic, Not Deliberative, Democracy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 6 (1):155-174.score: 180.0
    Given the concern they share for the common good, both patriotic and deliberative conceptions of democracy can be said to have roots in classical republicanism. But these two modern approaches to politics are not the same. In order to show this, as well as demonstrate patriotism's superiority to deliberative democracy, I offer four criticisms of the latter: (i) its support of a theory or systematic set of procedures for conversation distorts its practice; (ii) it is ideologically (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. John S. Dryzek (2005). Deliberative Democracy in Divided Societies: Alternatives to Agonism and Analgesia. Political Theory 33 (2):218 - 242.score: 180.0
    For contemporary democratic theorists, democracy is largely a matter of deliberation. But the recent rise of deliberative democracy (in practice as well as theory) coincided with ever more prominent identity politics, sometimes in murderous form in deeply divided societies. This essay considers how deliberative democracy can process the toughest issues concerning mutually contradictory assertions of identity. After considering the alternative answers provided by agonists and consociational democrats, the author makes the case for a power-sharing state (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Joseph Femia (1996). Complexity and Deliberative Democracy. Inquiry 39 (3 & 4):359 – 397.score: 180.0
    Communism may be dead, but a quasi?Marxist critique of liberal democracy survives in the writings of a number of thinkers ? most notably, David Miller and John Dryzek ? who deplore the self?centered apathy of their fellow citizens and defend the radical ideal of deliberative democracy. Inspired mainly by Rousseau and Habermas, this emergent school of thought argues for a more participatory system where the public interest takes precedence over private interest, and where rational argument replaces cynical (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. M. Bacon (2010). The Politics of Truth: A Critique of Peircean Deliberative Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1075-1091.score: 180.0
    Recent discussion in democratic theory has seen a revival of interest in pragmatism. Drawing on the work of C. S. Peirce, Cheryl Misak and Robert Talisse have argued that a form of deliberative democracy is justified as the means for citizens to assure themselves of the truth of their beliefs. In this article, I suggest that the Peircean account of deliberative democracy is conceived too narrowly. It takes its force from seeing citizens as intellectual inquirers, something (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Margaret Kohn (2000). Language, Power, and Persuasion: Toward a Critique of Deliberative Democracy. Constellations 7 (3):408-429.score: 180.0
    The past twenty years have witnessed the consolidation of deliberation as the normative basis of democratic theory. Although different versions of deliberative democracy vary in scope and degree of institutionalization, they share the assumption that the rational consensus engendered through discussion should serve as the normative guide for democratic politics. Although this tradition has roots in the birth of bourgeois liberal thought, it has received renewed attention due to Habermas’s reformulation on the basis of discourse ethics. In his (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. John S. Dryzek & Christian List (2004). Social Choice Theory and Deliberative Democracy : A Response to Aldred. British Journal of Political Science 34 (4):752-758.score: 180.0
    Jonathan Aldred shares our desire to promote a reconciliation between social choice theory and deliberative democracy in the interests of a more comprehensive and compelling account of democracy.1 His comments on some details of our analysis – specifically, our use of Arrow’s conditions of universal domain and independence of irrelevant alternatives – give us an opportunity to clarify our position. His discussion of the independence condition in particular identifies some ambiguity in our exposition, and as such is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Archon Fung (2005). Deliberation Before the Revolution: Toward an Ethics of Deliberative Democracy in an Unjust World. Political Theory 33 (3):397 - 419.score: 180.0
    Deliberative democracy is a revolutionary political ideal that requires fundamental changes in political institutions, bases of collective decision making, and the distribution of resources. Perhaps because of its revolutionary character accounts of deliberation in political theory thus far have offered little guidance for actors in actually-existing democratic circumstances. This article develops an ethical account of deliberative democratic action under imperfectly just conditions characterized by material and political inequality and failures of reciprocity. Under such conditions, appropriate principles of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Robert B. Talisse (2004). Does Public Ignorance Defeat Deliberative Democracy? Critical Review 16 (4):455-463.score: 180.0
    Abstract Richard Posner and Ilya Somin have recently posed forceful versions of a common objection to deliberative democracy, the Public Ignorance Objection. This objection holds that demonstrably high levels of public ignorance render deliberative democracy practically impossible. But the public?ignorance data show that the public is ignorant in a way that does not necessarily defeat deliberative democracy. Posner and Somin have overestimated the force of the Public Ignorance Objection, so the question of deliberative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. John Parkinson (2006). Deliberating in the Real World: Problems of Legitimacy in Deliberative Democracy. OUP Oxford.score: 180.0
    Deliberative democracy has become the central reference point for democracy theorists over the last decade or so, influencing normative frameworks and the ways we conceptualize the workings of democratic societies. It has also been linked with a burst of experimentation with new procedures that involve citizens directly in deliberations about public policy. -/- But there is a contradiction at the heart of deliberative democracy: it seems that it cannot deliver legitimate agreements. Deliberative decisions are (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. A. Gimmler (2001). Deliberative Democracy, the Public Sphere and the Internet. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (4):21-39.score: 180.0
    The internet could be an efficient political instrument if it were seen as part of a democracy where free and open discourse within a vital public sphere plays a decisive role. The model of deliberative democracy, as developed by Jürgen Habermas and Seyla Benhabib, serves this concept of democracy best. The paper explores first the model of deliberative democracy as a ‘two-track model’ in which representative democracy is backed by the public sphere and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. M. Richey (2012). Motivated Reasoning in Political Information Processing: The Death Knell of Deliberative Democracy? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 42 (4):511-542.score: 180.0
    In this article, I discuss what motivated reasoning research tells us about the prospects for deliberative democracy. In section I, I introduce the results of several political psychology studies examining the problematic affective and cognitive processing of political information by individuals in nondeliberative, experimental environments. This is useful because these studies are often neglected in political philosophy literature. Section II has three stages. First, I sketch how the study results from section I question the practical viability of (...) democracy. Second, I briefly present the results of three empirical studies of political deliberation that can be interpreted to counter the findings of the studies in section I. Third, I show why this is a misinterpretation and that the study results from section I mean that it is implausible that sites of political deliberation would naturally emerge from the wide public sphere and coalesce into institutionalized forms of the practice such that deliberative democracy can satisfy its raison d’être. Finally, in section III, I conclude that viable conceptions of deliberative democracy should be limited to narrower aims. (shrink)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Griffin Trotter (2006). Bioethics and Deliberative Democracy: Five Warnings From Hobbes. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (3):235 – 250.score: 180.0
    Thomas Hobbes is one of the most ardent and thoroughgoing opponents of participatory democracy among Western political philosophers. Though Hobbes's alternative to participatory democracy - assent by subjects to rule by an absolute sovereign - no longer constitutes a viable political alternative for Westerners, his critique of participatory democracy is a potentially valuable source of insight about its liabilities. This essay elaborates five theses from Hobbes that stand as cogent warnings to those who embrace (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. C. F. Rostboll (2008). Emancipation or Accommodation?: Habermasian Vs. Rawlsian Deliberative Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 34 (7):707-736.score: 180.0
    The development of the theory of deliberative democracy has culminated in a synthesis between Rawlsian political liberalism and Habermasian critical theory. Taking the perspective of conceptions of freedom, this article argues that this synthesis is unfortunate and obscures some important differences between the two traditions. In particular, the idea of internal autonomy, which was an important, implicit idea in the ideology critique of the earlier Habermas, falls out of view. There is no room for this dimension of freedom (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Christopher McMahon (1999). :Deliberative Democracy: Essays on Reason and Politics. Ethics 109 (3):648-650.score: 180.0
    Ideals of democratic participation and rational self-government have long informed modern political theory. As a recent elaboration of these ideals, the concept of deliberative democracy is based on the principle that legitimate democracy issues from the public deliberation of citizens. This remarkably fruitful concept has spawned investigations along a number of lines. Areas of inquiry include the nature and value of deliberation, the feasibility and desirability of consensus on contentious issues, the implications of institutional complexity and cultural (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. William Nelson (2000). The Institutions of Deliberative Democracy. Social Philosophy and Policy 17 (01):181-.score: 180.0
    This paper addresses two questions. First, how different is the ideal underlying deliberative democracy from the ideal expressed in contemporary liberal theory, especially contractualist theory and "political liberalism"? Second, what specific institutional prescriptions, if any, follow from deliberative democracy? It is argued that the deliberative ideal has become quite abstract and, in fact, does not differ significantly from many forms of contemporary liberalism. Moreover, it is something of an open question just what institutions best realize (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. C. Farrelly (2009). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis, Reproductive Freedom, and Deliberative Democracy. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (2):135-154.score: 180.0
    In this paper I argue that the account of deliberative democracy advanced by Amy Gutmann and Dennis Thompson (1996, 2004) is a useful normative theory that can help enhance our deliberations about public policy in morally pluralistic societies. More specifically, I illustrate how the prescriptions of deliberative democracy can be applied to the issue of regulating non-medical uses of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), such as gender selection. Deliberative democracy does not aim to win a (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Luiz Paulo Rouanet (2013). On the "Abstract" Character of Deliberative Democracy. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (SPE):177-194.score: 180.0
    O presente texto propõe-se discutir o suposto caráter abstrato da chamada democracia deliberativa, tomando como base a ética discursiva e a teoria da ação comunicativa. Se, por um lado, a democracia deliberativa não pretende ser mais que um modelo teórico para orientar as discussões em torno da democracia, por outro, alguns de seus enunciados podem e são efetivamente incorporados à prática política das sociedades democráticas contemporâneas. A questão aqui é saber o quanto de concreto e propositivo se pode encontrar especialmente (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. James Fishkin (2009). When the People Speak: Deliberative Democracy and Public Consultation. OUP Oxford.score: 180.0
    All over the world democratic reforms have brought power to the people-but under conditions where the people have little opportunity to think about the power that they exercise. Do we want a democracy inspired by Madison or by Madison Avenue? A democracy animated by deliberation or by manipulation? This book examines each of the principal democratic theories and makes the case for a democracy in which the people offer informed judgments about politics or policy. It then goes (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Kaveh L. Afrasiabi (1999). Deliberative Democracy and its Discontents. Telos 1999 (117):190-192.score: 180.0
    Philosophy's “linguistic turn” was destined to find its way into derivative disciplines such as political theory. In the last two decades, this turn has led to an absurd reductionism extrapolating the essence of existing democracies from their mode of communication. Flattening political theory, followers of this fashion rarely relinquish their fixation with the communicative component of modern democracies to the level of a multifaceted analysis. The central notion here is “deliberative democracy.” But is this a distinct model of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000