Search results for 'Delivery of health care' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Calvin W. Schwabe (1998). Integrated Delivery of Primary Health Care for Humans and Animals. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):121-125.score: 936.0
    Partially because of the high cost of developing and maintaining cold chains, systems needed to keep heat-labile vaccines under adequate refrigeration from their points of manufacture to their administration in the field, the Joint WHO/FAO Expert Committee on Zoonoses (i.e., the approximately four fifths of all described human infections that people share with other vertebrate animals) recommended in 1982 operation of common cold chains by health and veterinary services in rural areas. Following this recommendation, a 1984 pilot level initiative (...)
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  2. Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) (2007). Principles of Health Care Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.score: 876.0
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art (...)
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  3. Audrey R. Chapman (2008). Book Review of Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing and Delivery of Health Care in America by Donald A. Barr. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):9.score: 816.0
    Donald A. Barr's Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America (second edition, 2007) offers a lucid and informative overview of the U.S. health system and the dilemmas policy makers currently face. Barr has provided a balanced introduction to the way health care is organized, financed, and delivered in the United States. The thirteen chapters of the book are quite comprehensive in the topics they cover. Even (...)
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  4. Stephen Buetow (2011). The Virtue of Uncertainty in Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):873-876.score: 762.0
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  5. Rashmi Kumar, Vijay Jaiswal, Sandeep Tripathi, Akshay Kumar & M. Z. Idris (2007). Inequity in Health Care Delivery in India: The Problem of Rural Medical Practitioners. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (3):223-233.score: 762.0
    A considerable section of the population in India accesses the services of individual private medical practitioners (PMPs) for primary level care. In rural areas, these providers include MBBS doctors, practitioners of alternative systems of medicine, herbalists, indigenous and folk practitioners, compounders and others. This paper describes the profile, knowledge and some practices of the rural doctor in India and then discusses the reasons for lack of equity in health care access in rural areas and possible solutions to (...)
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  6. David Katerndahl, Michael Parchman & Robert Wood (2010). Trends in the Perceived Complexity of Primary Health Care: A Secondary Analysis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (5):1002-1008.score: 762.0
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  7. Gavin H. Mooney & Alistair McGuire (eds.) (1988). Medical Ethics and Economics in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 687.0
    Providing health care in the most cost-effective way has become a priority in recent years. This book tackles the important issue of the potential conflict between economic expediency and the welfare of individual patients. Contributors examine different attitudes to this complex problem, along with a variety of legal and historical perspectives. The book addresses particular aspects of health care, such as medical expert systems, general practice, medical education, and clinical decision-making where the direct involvement of doctors (...)
     
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  8. Mark R. Wicclair (2011). Conscientious Objection in Health Care: An Ethical Analysis. Cambridge University Press.score: 684.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Three approaches to conscientious objection in health care: conscience absolutism, the incompatibility thesis, and compromise; 3. Ethical limitations on the exercise of conscience; 4. Pharmacies, health care institutions, and conscientious objection; 5. Students, residents, and conscience-based exemptions; 6. Conscience clauses: too little and too much protection; References.
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  9. Nancye M. Peel, Catherine Travers, Rebecca A. R. Bell & Kate Smith (2010). Evaluation of a Health Service Delivery Intervention to Promote Falls Prevention in Older People Across the Care Continuum. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1254-1261.score: 684.0
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  10. Karolyn L. A. White, Christopher F. C. Jordens & Ian Kerridge (forthcoming). Contextualising Professional Ethics: The Impact of the Prison Context on the Practices and Norms of Health Care Practitioners. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-13.score: 675.0
    Health care is provided in many contexts—not just hospitals, clinics, and community health settings. Different institutional settings may significantly influence the design and delivery of health care and the ethical obligations and practices of health care practitioners working within them. This is particularly true in institutions that are established to constrain freedom, ensure security and authority, and restrict movement and choice. We describe the results of a qualitative study of the experiences of (...)
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  11. Jacqueline Savard (2013). Personalised Medicine: A Critique on the Future of Health Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):197-203.score: 669.0
    In recent years we have seen the emergence of “personalised medicine.” This development can be seen as the logical product of reductionism in medical science in which disease is increasingly understood in molecular terms. Personalised medicine has flourished as a consequence of the application of neoliberal principles to health care, whereby a commercial and social need for personalised medicine has been created. More specifically, personalised medicine benefits from the ongoing commercialisation of the body and of genetic knowledge, the (...)
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  12. S. Mehrdad Mohammadi, S. Farzad Mohammadi & Jerris R. Hedges (2007). Conceptualizing a Quality Plan for Healthcare. Health Care Analysis 15 (4):337-361.score: 660.0
    Today, health systems around the world are under pressure to create greater value for patients and society [81, p. 1, 119]; increasing access, improving client orientation and responsiveness, reducing medical errors and safety, restraining utilization via managed care, and implementing priority allocation of resources for high-burden health problems are examples of strategies towards this end. The quality paradigm by virtue of its strategic consumer focus and its methods for achieving operational excellence has proved an effective approach for (...)
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  13. Cristina Richie (2014). Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).score: 648.0
    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the (...)
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  14. Alan S. Coates (forthcoming). Application of Quality of Life Measures in Health Care Delivery. Journal of Palliative Care.score: 648.0
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  15. Bernard Ineichen (forthcoming). Culture, Health and Illness. By C. Helman. 2nd Edn. Pp. 344.(Butterworth Scientific, Guildford, 1990.)£ 12.95 (Paperback). This is a Fascinating, Though Not Flawless Book. Dr Helman's Aim is to Convey the Relevance of Medical Anthropology to Health Practitioners, in the Hope That They Might Use Such Knowledge to Improve Their Delivery of Health Care. To This End He. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science.score: 624.0
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  16. Reinhard Priester (ed.) (1989). Rethinking Medical Morality: The Ethical Implications of Changes in Health Care Organization, Delivery, and Financing. Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Minnesota.score: 618.0
     
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  17. John J. Regan (1990). Financial Planning for Health Care in Older Age: Implications for the Delivery of Health Services. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (3):274-281.score: 615.0
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  18. Maria W. Merritt (2011). Health Researchers' Ancillary Care Obligations in Low-Resource Settings: How Can We Tell What is Morally Required? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (4):311-347.score: 612.0
    Health researchers working in low-resource settings routinely encounter serious unmet health needs for which research participants have, at best, limited treatment options through the local health system (Taylor, Merritt, and Mullany 2011). A recent case discussion features a study conducted in Bamako, Mali (Dickert and Wendler 2009). The study objective was to see whether children with severe malaria develop pulmonary hypertension in order to improve the general understanding of morbidity and mortality associated with malaria. In the study (...)
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  19. Henry W. Mannle (2001). Market Structure, Claims Fraud and Ethical Concerns in the Delivery of Health Care Services. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 20 (2):23-45.score: 612.0
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  20. James F. Childress (forthcoming). Fairness in the Allocation and Delivery of Health Care: A Case Study in Organ Transplantation. Practical Reasoning in Bioethics.score: 612.0
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  21. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1999). Christian Ethics and the Delivery of Health Care. Hastings Center Report 29 (5):42-42.score: 612.0
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  22. W. D. White (1987). Agency and the Organization of Health Care Delivery. Inquiry 24:405-415.score: 603.0
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  23. George Bugliarello (2011). Global Health Care Delivery: A Pandora’s Box of Ethical Issues. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 2 (1):71-76.score: 594.0
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  24. G. Anderson (1999). 'We Went Through Psychological Hell': A Case Report of Prenatal Diagnosis-Response by Gwen Anderson, Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham MA, USA-Prenatal Genetics Services Signal a Much Deeper Problem in Health Care Delivery. Nursing Ethics 6 (3):254-256.score: 594.0
     
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  25. Mary Gore Forrester (1991). Some Considerations of Justice in Rural Health Care Delivery. In Charles V. Blatz (ed.), Ethics and Agriculture: An Anthology on Current Issues in World Context. University of Idaho Press.score: 594.0
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  26. Bansi Badan Mukhopadhyay (2007). Status of Patients and Physicians in Indian Scenario Its Improvement for Delivery of Better Health Care. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld.score: 594.0
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  27. Gary R. Anderson & Valerie A. Glesnes-Anderson (eds.) (1987). Health Care Ethics: A Guide for Decision Makers. Aspen Publishers.score: 570.0
  28. Ivan Illich (1976/1982). Medical Nemesis: The Expropriation of Health. Pantheon Books.score: 570.0
     
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  29. Helen Rehr (ed.) (1978). Ethical Dilemmas in Health Care: A Professional Search for Solutions. Published for the Doris Siegel Memorial Fund of the Mount Sinai Medical Center by Prodist.score: 570.0
     
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  30. Gerald P. Turner & Joseph Mapa (eds.) (1988). Humanistic Health Care: Issues for Caregivers. Health Administration Press.score: 570.0
     
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  31. Chan Ho-mun (1999). Free Choice, Equity, and Care: The Moral Foundations of Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (6):624 – 637.score: 564.0
    The aims of this paper are threefold. The first aim is to provide a critique of the reform proposal of the Harvard School of Public Health for Hong Kong's health care system through privatization of the public sector services. The second aim is to argue for the duty of society to guarantee every member equal access to a basic level of health care based on the values of equity, care and free choice. The third (...)
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  32. Rajeev Chaudhry, Sidna M. Tulledge‐Scheitel, Doug A. Parks, Kurt B. Angstman, Lindsay K. Decker & Robert J. Stroebel (2012). Use of a Web‐Based Clinical Decision Support System to Improve Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening in a Primary Care Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):666-670.score: 564.0
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  33. John Eaton, Darcy Reed, Kurt B. Angstman, Kris Thomas, Frederick North, Robert Stroebel, Sidna M. Tulledge‐Scheitel & Rajeev Chaudhry (2012). Effect of Visit Length and a Clinical Decision Support Tool on Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Screening Rates in a Primary Care Practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):593-598.score: 564.0
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  34. R. L. Sevensky (1983). The Religious Foundations of Health Care: A Conceptual Approach. Journal of Medical Ethics 9 (3):165-169.score: 561.0
    The relationship of religion and health is often misunderstood owing to a tendency to concentrate on the medical model and to ignore the wider context of heath care. A conceptual--as opposed to a historical--examination of this context reveals nine central religious ideas or categories which provide an ethical foundation and heritage for medical practice and health care delivery. These include doctrines of creation; dominion or stewardship; freedom and responsibility; human dignity or sanctity of life; love (...)
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  35. Neema Sofaer & Daniel Strech (2011). The Need for Systematic Reviews of Reasons. Bioethics 26 (6):315-328.score: 558.0
    There are many ethical decisions in the practice of health research and care, and in the creation of policy and guidelines. We argue that those charged with making such decisions need a new genre of review. The new genre is an application of the systematic review, which was developed over decades to inform medical decision-makers about what the totality of studies that investigate links between smoking and cancer, for example, implies about whether smoking causes cancer. We argue that (...)
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  36. Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.score: 555.8
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether (...)
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  37. Oscar E. Firbank (2008). Unpacking the Meaning of Quality in Quebec's Health-Care System: The Input of Commissions of Inquiry. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):375-396.score: 555.8
    The paper explores how several commissions of inquiry established in Quebec, Canada, have, over time, contributed in redefining the meaning of quality in health-care and its management. Adopting an interpretive analysis of commissions’ reports, the paper examines the particular ‘conceptual boxes’ used by their members to tackle quality and the embedded nature of their work. It is shown that although quality was always considered, this was generally done by bringing into focus specific quality domains and issues, some new, (...)
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  38. Larry O. Gostin (1997). Personal Privacy in the Health Care System: Employer-Sponsored Insurance, Managed Care, and Integrated Delivery Systems. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (4):361-376.score: 555.0
    : Widespread collection and use of identifiable information can promote social goods while, at the same time, infringing on personal privacy. Information systems are developing within the context of a fundamental transformation in the organization, delivery, and financing of health care. Changes in the health care system include rapid development of employer-sponsored health coverage, managed care organizations, and integrated delivery systems. These complex, multifaceted arrangements for delivering and paying for health (...) require ever-more-sophisticated information systems that facilitate extensive sharing of personal data. Systemic flows of sensitive health information occur both vertically and horizontally among employers, hospitals, insurers, laboratories, and suppliers. Beyond this complex web of vertical and horizontal sharing are the multiple demands for information management, quality assurance, research, governmental regulation, and public health. Theoretical problems exist with the law and ethics of informational privacy. The traditional method of exercising control over personal health information is through informed consent. Informed consent, however, within a modern health information infrastructure becomes highly complex. In this kind of environment, the doctrine of informed consent is flawed and does not provide sufficient control over personal information to assure adequate protection of privacy. (shrink)
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  39. Vikki A. Entwistle & Ian S. Watt (2013). Treating Patients as Persons: A Capabilities Approach to Support Delivery of Person-Centered Care. American Journal of Bioethics 13 (8):29-39.score: 555.0
    Health services internationally struggle to ensure health care is ?person-centered? (or similar). In part, this is because there are many interpretations of ?person-centered care? (and near synonyms), some of which seem unrealistic for some patients or situations and obscure the intrinsic value of patients? experiences of health care delivery. The general concern behind calls for person-centered care is an ethical one: Patients should be ?treated as persons.? We made novel use of insights (...)
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  40. C. Cherry (1997). Health Care, Human Worth and the Limits of the Particular. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (5):310-314.score: 552.0
    An ethics concerned with health care developments and systems must be historically continuous, especially as it concerns the application to managed structures of key moral-epistemic concepts such as care, love and empathy. These concepts are traditionally most at home in the personal, individual domain. Human beings have non-instrumental worth just because they are human beings and not by virtue of their capacities. Managed health care systems tend to abstract from this worth in respect of both (...)
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  41. William Campbell Felch (1996). The Secret(S) of Good Patient Care: Thoughts on Medicine in the 21st Century. Praeger.score: 552.0
     
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  42. John A. Gallagher & Jerry Goodstein (2002). Fulfilling Institutional Responsibilities in Health Care: Organizational Ethics and the Role of Mission Discernment. Business Ethics Quarterly 12 (4):433-450.score: 543.0
    Abstract: In this paper we highlight the emergence of organizational ethics issues in health care as an important outcome of the changing structure of health care delivery. We emphasize three core themes related to business ethics and health care ethics: integrity, responsibility, and choice. These themes are brought together in a discussion of the process of Mission Discernment as it has been developed and implemented within an integrated health care system. Through (...)
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  43. Moses B. F. Massaquoi & Stephen B. Kennedy (2003). Evaluation of Chloroquine as a Potent Anti‐Malarial Drug: Issues of Public Health Policy and Healthcare Delivery in Post‐War Liberia. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 9 (1):83-87.score: 534.0
    Chloroquine-resistant plasmodium falciparum malaria is a serious public health threat that is spreading rapidly across Sub-Saharan Africa. It affects over three quarters (80%) of malarial endemic countries. Of the estimated 300-500 million cases of malaria reported annually, the vast majority of malarial-related morbidities occur among young children in Africa, especially those concentrated in the remote rural areas with inadequate access to appropriate health care services. In Liberia, in vivo studies conducted between 1993 and 2000 observed varying degrees (...)
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  44. Ursula Naue (2008). 'Self-Care Without a Self': Alzheimer's Disease and the Concept of Personal Responsibility for Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):315-324.score: 531.0
    The article focuses on the impact of the concept of self-care on persons who are understood as incapable of self-care due to their physical and/or mental ‘incapacity’. The article challenges the idea of this health care concept as empowerment and highlights the difficulties for persons who do not fit into this concept. To exemplify this, the self-care concept is discussed with regard to persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the case of persons with AD, self- (...) is interpreted in many different ways—depending on the point of view, for instance as an affected person or a carer. To prevent a marginalisation of the growing group of elderly persons with dementia, the article argues that concepts such as those of personhood, wellbeing, autonomy, rationality and normality have to be re-thought with regard to an increasingly ageing population. Taking into account that AD as a socio-medical construct has to be understood in the context of power relations, the article focuses on the mutual influence between the concepts of self-care and of AD and its possible impact on governing dementia and AD in particular. Michel Foucault’s considerations on ‘technologies of the self’ provide the basis for the discussion of the self-care concept within existing societal power relations. (shrink)
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  45. Jean V. McHale (2013). Faith, Belief, Fundamental Rights and Delivering Health Care in a Modern NHS: An Unrealistic Aspiration? [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):224-236.score: 528.0
    This paper considers the way in which English law safeguards fundamental rights to respect for faith and belief in relation to the delivery of health care. It explores the implications of the Human Rights Act 1998 and the Equality Act 2010. It explores some of the challenges in attempting to reconcile fundamental rights to faith and belief and the delivery of health care, both now and in the future and whether this is a realistic (...)
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  46. Stephen Pattison (2013). Religion, Spirituality and Health Care: Confusions, Tensions, Opportunities. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):193-207.score: 525.0
    This paper raises some issues about understanding religion, religions and spirituality in health care to enable a more critical mutual engagement and dialogue to take place between health care institutions and religious communities and believers. Understanding religions and religious people is a complex, interesting matter. Taking into account the whole reality of religion and spirituality is not just about meeting specific needs, nor of trying to ensure that religious people abandon their distinctive beliefs and insights when (...)
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  47. Michele E. Lipner & Ralph B. Brown (1995). Constraints to the Integration of the Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia (CCPP) Vaccine Into Kenya's Animal Health Delivery System. Agriculture and Human Values 12 (2):19-28.score: 522.0
    Animal health is key to successful livestock production in developing countries. The development and delivery of vaccines against major epidemic diseases is one component of improving animal health. This paper presents a case study from Kenya on the production and delivery of a vaccine against Contagious Caprine Pleuropneumonia (CCPP), a major disease of goats. The vaccine, while technically a viable preventative measure against CCPP, has not been well integrated into Kenya's animal health care system. (...)
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  48. Robert M. Veatch (2009). Patient, Heal Thyself: How the New Medicine Puts the Patient in Charge. Oxford University Press.score: 522.0
    The puzzling case of the broken arm -- Hernias, diets, and drugs -- Why physicians cannot know what will benefit patients -- Sacrificing patient benefit to protect patient rights -- Societal interests and duties to others -- The new, limited, twenty-first-century role for physicians as patient assistants -- Abandoning modern medical concepts: doctor's "orders" and hospital "discharge" -- Medicine can't "indicate": so why do we talk that way? --"Treatments of choice" and "medical necessity": who is fooling whom? -- Abandoning informed (...)
     
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  49. Indrė Špokienė (2010). The Concept of Solidarity and its Role in Health Care Regulation (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 121 (3):329-348.score: 519.8
    The principle of solidarity is one of the fundamental legal principles applied in the field of health care regulation. This article analyses EU and Lithuanian legal acts, judicial practice, the doctrine of law and foreign scientific resources in order to reveal the content of solidarity principle and to discuss its role in the legal regulation of health care both at EU and national levels. The article is divided into three parts. The first part of the paper (...)
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  50. Maude Laliberté, Matthew Hunt, Bryn Williams-Jones & Debbie Ehrmann Feldman (2013). Health Care Professionals and Bedbugs: An Ethical Analysis of a Resurgent Scourge. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (3):245-255.score: 513.0
    Many health care professionals (HCPs) are understandably reluctant to treat patients in environments infested with bedbugs, in part due to the risk of themselves becoming bedbug vectors to their own homes and workplaces. However, bedbugs are increasingly widespread in care settings, such as nursing homes, as well as in private homes visited by HCPs, leading to increased questions of how health care organizations and their staff ought to respond. This situation is associated with a range (...)
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