Search results for 'Delivery of health care' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Calvin W. Schwabe (1998). Integrated Delivery of Primary Health Care for Humans and Animals. Agriculture and Human Values 15 (2):121-125.score: 234.0
    Partially because of the high cost of developing and maintaining cold chains, systems needed to keep heat-labile vaccines under adequate refrigeration from their points of manufacture to their administration in the field, the Joint WHO/FAO Expert Committee on Zoonoses (i.e., the approximately four fifths of all described human infections that people share with other vertebrate animals) recommended in 1982 operation of common cold chains by health and veterinary services in rural areas. Following this recommendation, a 1984 pilot level initiative (...)
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  2. Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) (2007). Principles of Health Care Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.score: 219.0
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art (...)
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  3. Audrey R. Chapman (2008). Book Review of Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing and Delivery of Health Care in America by Donald A. Barr. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3 (1):9.score: 204.0
    Donald A. Barr's Introduction to U.S. Health Policy: The Organization, Financing, and Delivery of Health Care in America (second edition, 2007) offers a lucid and informative overview of the U.S. health system and the dilemmas policy makers currently face. Barr has provided a balanced introduction to the way health care is organized, financed, and delivered in the United States. The thirteen chapters of the book are quite comprehensive in the topics they cover. Even (...)
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  4. Stephen Buetow (2011). The Virtue of Uncertainty in Health Care. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):873-876.score: 190.5
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  5. David Katerndahl, Michael Parchman & Robert Wood (2010). Trends in the Perceived Complexity of Primary Health Care: A Secondary Analysis. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (5):1002-1008.score: 190.5
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  6. Rashmi Kumar, Vijay Jaiswal, Sandeep Tripathi, Akshay Kumar & M. Z. Idris (2007). Inequity in Health Care Delivery in India: The Problem of Rural Medical Practitioners. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 15 (3):223-233.score: 190.5
    A considerable section of the population in India accesses the services of individual private medical practitioners (PMPs) for primary level care. In rural areas, these providers include MBBS doctors, practitioners of alternative systems of medicine, herbalists, indigenous and folk practitioners, compounders and others. This paper describes the profile, knowledge and some practices of the rural doctor in India and then discusses the reasons for lack of equity in health care access in rural areas and possible solutions to (...)
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  7. Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.score: 185.3
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administration’s Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether (...)
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  8. Oscar E. Firbank (2008). Unpacking the Meaning of Quality in Quebec's Health-Care System: The Input of Commissions of Inquiry. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):375-396.score: 185.3
    The paper explores how several commissions of inquiry established in Quebec, Canada, have, over time, contributed in redefining the meaning of quality in health-care and its management. Adopting an interpretive analysis of commissions’ reports, the paper examines the particular ‘conceptual boxes’ used by their members to tackle quality and the embedded nature of their work. It is shown that although quality was always considered, this was generally done by bringing into focus specific quality domains and issues, some new, (...)
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  9. Ursula Naue (2008). 'Self-Care Without a Self': Alzheimer's Disease and the Concept of Personal Responsibility for Health. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):315-324.score: 177.0
    The article focuses on the impact of the concept of self-care on persons who are understood as incapable of self-care due to their physical and/or mental ‘incapacity’. The article challenges the idea of this health care concept as empowerment and highlights the difficulties for persons who do not fit into this concept. To exemplify this, the self-care concept is discussed with regard to persons with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In the case of persons with AD, self- (...) is interpreted in many different ways—depending on the point of view, for instance as an affected person or a carer. To prevent a marginalisation of the growing group of elderly persons with dementia, the article argues that concepts such as those of personhood, wellbeing, autonomy, rationality and normality have to be re-thought with regard to an increasingly ageing population. Taking into account that AD as a socio-medical construct has to be understood in the context of power relations, the article focuses on the mutual influence between the concepts of self-care and of AD and its possible impact on governing dementia and AD in particular. Michel Foucault’s considerations on ‘technologies of the self’ provide the basis for the discussion of the self-care concept within existing societal power relations. (shrink)
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  10. Indrė Špokienė (2010). The Concept of Solidarity and its Role in Health Care Regulation (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 121 (3):329-348.score: 173.3
    The principle of solidarity is one of the fundamental legal principles applied in the field of health care regulation. This article analyses EU and Lithuanian legal acts, judicial practice, the doctrine of law and foreign scientific resources in order to reveal the content of solidarity principle and to discuss its role in the legal regulation of health care both at EU and national levels. The article is divided into three parts. The first part of the paper (...)
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  11. Gavin H. Mooney & Alistair McGuire (eds.) (1988). Medical Ethics and Economics in Health Care. Oxford University Press.score: 171.8
    Providing health care in the most cost-effective way has become a priority in recent years. This book tackles the important issue of the potential conflict between economic expediency and the welfare of individual patients. Contributors examine different attitudes to this complex problem, along with a variety of legal and historical perspectives. The book addresses particular aspects of health care, such as medical expert systems, general practice, medical education, and clinical decision-making where the direct involvement of doctors (...)
     
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  12. Mark R. Wicclair (2011). Conscientious Objection in Health Care: An Ethical Analysis. Cambridge University Press.score: 171.0
    Machine generated contents note: Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Three approaches to conscientious objection in health care: conscience absolutism, the incompatibility thesis, and compromise; 3. Ethical limitations on the exercise of conscience; 4. Pharmacies, health care institutions, and conscientious objection; 5. Students, residents, and conscience-based exemptions; 6. Conscience clauses: too little and too much protection; References.
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  13. Maude Laliberté, Matthew Hunt, Bryn Williams-Jones & Debbie Ehrmann Feldman (2013). Health Care Professionals and Bedbugs: An Ethical Analysis of a Resurgent Scourge. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (3):245-255.score: 171.0
    Many health care professionals (HCPs) are understandably reluctant to treat patients in environments infested with bedbugs, in part due to the risk of themselves becoming bedbug vectors to their own homes and workplaces. However, bedbugs are increasingly widespread in care settings, such as nursing homes, as well as in private homes visited by HCPs, leading to increased questions of how health care organizations and their staff ought to respond. This situation is associated with a range (...)
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  14. Nancye M. Peel, Catherine Travers, Rebecca A. R. Bell & Kate Smith (2010). Evaluation of a Health Service Delivery Intervention to Promote Falls Prevention in Older People Across the Care Continuum. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 16 (6):1254-1261.score: 171.0
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  15. Jacqueline Savard (2013). Personalised Medicine: A Critique on the Future of Health Care. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):197-203.score: 167.3
    In recent years we have seen the emergence of “personalised medicine.” This development can be seen as the logical product of reductionism in medical science in which disease is increasingly understood in molecular terms. Personalised medicine has flourished as a consequence of the application of neoliberal principles to health care, whereby a commercial and social need for personalised medicine has been created. More specifically, personalised medicine benefits from the ongoing commercialisation of the body and of genetic knowledge, the (...)
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  16. S. Mehrdad Mohammadi, S. Farzad Mohammadi & Jerris R. Hedges (2007). Conceptualizing a Quality Plan for Healthcare. Health Care Analysis 15 (4):337-361.score: 165.0
    Today, health systems around the world are under pressure to create greater value for patients and society [81, p. 1, 119]; increasing access, improving client orientation and responsiveness, reducing medical errors and safety, restraining utilization via managed care, and implementing priority allocation of resources for high-burden health problems are examples of strategies towards this end. The quality paradigm by virtue of its strategic consumer focus and its methods for achieving operational excellence has proved an effective approach for (...)
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  17. Cristina Richie (2014). Global Health Care Justice, Delivery Doctors and Assisted Reproduction: Taking a Note From Catholic Social Teachings. Developing World Bioethics 14 (1).score: 162.0
    This article will examine the Catholic concept of global justice within a health care framework as it relates to women's needs for delivery doctors in the developing world and women's demands for assisted reproduction in the developed world. I will first discuss justice as a theory, situating it within Catholic social teachings. The Catholic perspective on global justice in health care demands that everyone have access to basic needs before elective treatments are offered to the (...)
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  18. Alan S. Coates (forthcoming). Application of Quality of Life Measures in Health Care Delivery. Journal of Palliative Care.score: 162.0
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  19. Per-Erik Liss (2003). The Significance of the Goal of Health Care for the Setting of Priorities. Health Care Analysis 11 (2):161-169.score: 157.5
    The purpose of the article is to argue for the significance of a clarified goal of health care for the setting of priorities. Three arguments are explored. First, assessment of needs becomes necessary in so far as the principle of need should guide the priority-setting. The concept of health care need includes a goal component. This component should for rational reasons be identical with the goal of health care. Second, in order to use resources (...)
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  20. Ricca Edmondson & Jane Pearce (2007). The Practice of Health Care: Wisdom as a Model. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (3):233-244.score: 157.5
    Reasoning and judgement in health care entail complex responses to problems whose demands typically derive from several areas of specialism at once. We argue that current evidence- or value-based models of health care reasoning, despite their virtues, are insufficient to account for responses to such problems exhaustively. At the same time, we offer reasons for contending that health professionals in fact engage in forms of reasoning of a kind described for millennia under the concept of (...)
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  21. Casper Bruun Jensen (2008). Power, Technology and Social Studies of Health Care: An Infrastructural Inversion. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (4):355-374.score: 157.5
    Power, dominance, and hierarchy are prevalent analytical terms in social studies of health care. Power is often seen as residing in medical structures, institutions, discourses, or ideologies. While studies of medical power often draw on Michel Foucault, this understanding is quite different from his proposal to study in detail the “strategies, the networks, the mechanisms, all those techniques by which a decision is accepted” [Foucault, M. (1988). In Politics, philosophy, culture: Interviews and other writings 1977–84 (pp. 96–109). New (...)
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  22. Eric Molleman, Manda Broekhuis, Renee Stoffels & Frans Jaspers (2008). How Health Care Complexity Leads to Cooperation and Affects the Autonomy of Health Care Professionals. Health Care Analysis 16 (4):329-341.score: 157.5
    Health professionals increasingly face patients with complex health problems and this pressurizes them to cooperate. The authors have analyzed how the complexity of health care problems relates to two types of cooperation: consultation and multidisciplinary teamwork (MTW). Moreover, they have analyzed the impact of these two types of cooperation on perceived professional autonomy. Two teams were studied, one team dealing with geriatric patients and another treating oncology patients. The authors conducted semi-structured interviews, studied written documents, held (...)
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  23. Larry R. Churchill (1999). The United States Health Care System Under Managed Care: How the Commodification of Health Care Distorts Ethics and Threatens Equity. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 7 (4):393-411.score: 156.8
    Describing the U.S. health care system meansdescribing managed care under commercial forces.Managed care creates new moral tension forpractitioners, but more importantly, in its currentform it intensifies the commercialization of healthexpectations and interactions. The largely unregulatedmarketing of health services under managed care hasbeen a major factor in the increasing number ofuninsured citizens, while claims for cost reductionthrough managed care are equivocal. Risk-ratingpractices integral to the current medical marketplacethwart concerns for justice in allocation and createvulnerabilities (...)
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  24. Peter R. Sedgwick (2013). Instrumentalism, Civil Association and the Ethics of Health Care: Understanding the “Politics of Faith”. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):208-223.score: 156.8
    This paper offers critical reflection on the contemporary tendency to approach health care in instrumentalist terms. Instrumentalism is means-ends rationality. In contemporary society, the instrumentalist attitude is exemplified by the relationship between individual consumer and a provider of goods and services. The problematic nature of this attitude is illustrated by Michael Oakeshott’s conceptions of enterprise association and civil association. Enterprise association is instrumental; civil association is association in terms of an ethically delineated realm of practices. The latter offers (...)
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  25. Jean-Paul Moatti (1999). Ethical Issues in the Economic Assessment of Health Care Technologies. Health Care Analysis 7 (2):153-165.score: 156.8
    This paper challenges traditional views which oppose health economics and medical ethics by arguing that economic assessment is a necessary complement to medical ethics and can help to improve public participation and democratic processes in choices about resource allocation for health care technologies. In support of this argument, four points are emphasized: (1) Most current biomedical ethical debates implicitly deal with economic issues of resource allocation. (2) Clinical decisions, which usually respect the Hippocratic code of ethics, are (...)
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  26. Paul Jesilow (2005). The Effects of Fraud on the Evaluation of Health Care. Health Care Analysis 13 (3):239-245.score: 156.8
    Studies on health care practices, financing, and organization increasingly rely on Medicare and other expanded data sets. These studies are of critical importance for public policy and for the development of strategies to contain escalating health care costs, but they often use data that have been corrupted by fraud and abuse. Mistaken conclusions, as to the effectiveness of policy and procedures, are likely being reached in studies that have used corrupted data. Researchers need to consider the (...)
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  27. Bernard Ineichen (forthcoming). Culture, Health and Illness. By C. Helman. 2nd Edn. Pp. 344.(Butterworth Scientific, Guildford, 1990.)£ 12.95 (Paperback). This is a Fascinating, Though Not Flawless Book. Dr Helman's Aim is to Convey the Relevance of Medical Anthropology to Health Practitioners, in the Hope That They Might Use Such Knowledge to Improve Their Delivery of Health Care. To This End He. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science.score: 156.0
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  28. Nicola Pasini (2000). Solidarity and the Role of the State in Italian Health Care. Health Care Analysis 8 (4):341-354.score: 155.3
    The article deals with the issue of solidarity in health care,with particular reference to the Italian context. It presents thedifficulties of the Italian NHS and assesses the current proposalto counter the crisis of the Welfare State by giving upinstitutional arrangements, in order to favour the so-called`social private'. Moreover, it addresses the question ofprioritisation and targeting in the context of health care,arguing for the insufficiency of the standard approach of neutralliberalism, and showing how the concept of solidarity (...)
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  29. Niklas Juth (2013). Challenges for Principles of Need in Health Care. Health Care Analysis:1-15.score: 155.3
    What challenges must a principle of need for prioritisations in health care meet in order to be plausible and practically useful? Some progress in answering this question has recently been made by Hope, Østerdal and Hasman. This article continue their work by suggesting that the characteristic feature of principles of needs is that they are sufficientarian, saying that we have a right to a minimally acceptable or good life or health, but nothing more. Accordingly, principles of needs (...)
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  30. Rabee Toumi (forthcoming). Globalization and Health Care: Global Justice and the Role of Physicians. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-10.score: 155.3
    In today’s globalized world, nations cannot be totally isolated from or indifferent to their neighbors, especially in regards to medicine and health. While globalization has brought prosperity to millions, disparities among nations and nationals are growing raising once again the question of justice. Similarly, while medicine has developed dramatically over the past few decades, health disparities at the global level are staggering. Seemingly, what our humanity could achieve in matters of scientific development is not justly distributed to benefit (...)
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  31. Carl-Åke Elmersjö & Gert Helgesson (2008). Notions of Just Health Care at Three Swedish Hospitals. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):145-151.score: 155.3
    This article investigates what notions of “just health care” are found at three Swedish hospitals among health care personnel and whether these notions are relevant to what priorities are actually made. Fieldwork at all three hospitals and 114 in-depth interviews were conducted. Data have been subject to conceptual and ethical analysis and categorisation. According to our findings, justice is an important idea to health care personnel at the studied hospitals. Two main notions of just (...)
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  32. Lawrence O. Gostin (2002). Rights and Duties of HIV Infected Health Care Professionals. Health Care Analysis 10 (1):67-85.score: 154.5
    In 1991, the CDC recommended that health care workers (HCWs) infectedwith HIV or HBV (HbeAg positive) should be reviewed by an expert paneland should inform patients of their serologic status before engaging inexposure-prone procedures. The CDC, in light of the existing scientificuncertainty about the risk of transmission, issued cautiousrecommendations. However, considerable evidence has emerged since 1991suggesting that we should reform national policy. The data demonstratesthat risks of transmission of infection in the health care setting areexceedingly low. (...)
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  33. Lars Bernfort (2003). Decisions on Inclusion in the Swedish Basic Health Care Package—Roles of Cost-Effectiveness and Need. Health Care Analysis 11 (4):301-308.score: 154.5
    Background: Inclusion or not of a treatment strategy in the publicly financed health care is really a matter of prioritisation. In Sweden priority setting decisions are governed by law in which it is stated that decisions should be guided by firstly the principle of need and secondly the principle of cost-effectiveness.
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  34. Engelbert Theurl (1999). Some Aspects of the Reform of the Health Care Systems in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. Health Care Analysis 7 (4):331-354.score: 154.5
    The health care systems in Austria, Germany and Switzerland owe theirinstitutional structure to different historical developments. While Austriaand Germany voted for the Bismarck-Model of social health insurance,Switzerland adopted a voluntary system of health insurance. In all threecountries, until very recently, the different challenges which the healthcare sector faced were met by piecemeal approaches and by stop and gopolicies, which, in the long run were not very successful either incontaining costs or in improving efficacy and efficiency. During (...)
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  35. Rob Houtepen & Ruud ter Meulen (2000). The Expectation(s) of Solidarity: Matters of Justice, Responsibility and Identity in the Reconstruction of the Health Care System. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (4):355-376.score: 154.5
    We analyse solidarity as a mixture of social justice on the onehand and a set of cultural values and ascriptions on the otherhand. The latter defines the relevant sense of belonging togetherin a society. From a short analysis of the early stages of theDutch welfare state, we conclude that social responsibility wasoriginally based in religious and political associations. In theheyday of the welfare state, institutions such as sick funds,hospitals or nursing homes became financed collectively entirelyand became accessible to people of (...)
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  36. Byron Kaldis (2005). Could the Ethics of Institutionalized Health Care Be Anything but Kantian? Collecting Building Blocks for a Unifying Metaethics. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):39-52.score: 154.5
    Is a Health Care Ethics possible? Against sceptical and relativist doubts Kantian deontology may advance a challenging alternative affirming the possibility of such an ethics on the condition that deontology be adopted as a total programme or complete vision. Kantian deontology is enlisted to move us from an ethics of two-person informal care to one of institutions. It justifies this affirmative answer by occupying a commanding meta-ethical stand. Such a total programme comprises, on the one hand, a (...)
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  37. Rui Nunes, Guilhermina Rego & Cristina Brandão (2007). The Rise of Independent Regulation in Health Care. Health Care Analysis 15 (3):169-177.score: 154.5
    In all countries where health care access is considered a social right, regulation is both a tool of performance improvement as well as an instrument of social justice. Both social (equity in access) and economical (promoting competition) regulation are at stake due to the nature of the good itself. Different modalities of regulation do exist and usually new regulatory cycles include the creation of stronger regulatory agencies. Indeed, health care regulation is rising steadily in most developed (...)
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  38. Reinhard Priester (ed.) (1989). Rethinking Medical Morality: The Ethical Implications of Changes in Health Care Organization, Delivery, and Financing. Center for Biomedical Ethics, University of Minnesota.score: 154.5
     
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  39. John J. Regan (1990). Financial Planning for Health Care in Older Age: Implications for the Delivery of Health Services. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 18 (3):274-281.score: 153.8
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  40. Maria W. Merritt (2011). Health Researchers' Ancillary Care Obligations in Low-Resource Settings: How Can We Tell What is Morally Required? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 21 (4):311-347.score: 153.0
    Health researchers working in low-resource settings routinely encounter serious unmet health needs for which research participants have, at best, limited treatment options through the local health system (Taylor, Merritt, and Mullany 2011). A recent case discussion features a study conducted in Bamako, Mali (Dickert and Wendler 2009). The study objective was to see whether children with severe malaria develop pulmonary hypertension in order to improve the general understanding of morbidity and mortality associated with malaria. In the study (...)
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  41. Enric J. Novella (2010). Mental Health Care in the Aftermath of Deinstitutionalization: A Retrospective and Prospective View. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 18 (3):222-238.score: 153.0
    This paper offers a panoramic assessment of the significant changes experienced by psychiatric care in Western Europe and North America in the course of the last decades of deinstitutionalization and reform. Drawing on different comparative studies and an own review of relevant data and reports, the main transformations in the mental health field are analyzed around seven major topics: the expanding scope of psychiatry; the decline and metamorphosis of the asylum; the introduction of alternative and diversified forms of (...)
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  42. James F. Childress (forthcoming). Fairness in the Allocation and Delivery of Health Care: A Case Study in Organ Transplantation. Practical Reasoning in Bioethics.score: 153.0
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  43. Henry W. Mannle (2001). Market Structure, Claims Fraud and Ethical Concerns in the Delivery of Health Care Services. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 20 (2):23-45.score: 153.0
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  44. Daniel P. Sulmasy (1999). Christian Ethics and the Delivery of Health Care. Hastings Center Report 29 (5):42-42.score: 153.0
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  45. W. D. White (1987). Agency and the Organization of Health Care Delivery. Inquiry 24:405-415.score: 150.8
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  46. G. Anderson (1999). 'We Went Through Psychological Hell': A Case Report of Prenatal Diagnosis-Response by Gwen Anderson, Shriver Center for Mental Retardation, Waltham MA, USA-Prenatal Genetics Services Signal a Much Deeper Problem in Health Care Delivery. Nursing Ethics 6 (3):254-256.score: 148.5
     
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  47. George Bugliarello (2011). Global Health Care Delivery: A Pandora’s Box of Ethical Issues. Ethics in Biology, Engineering and Medicine 2 (1):71-76.score: 148.5
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  48. Mary Gore Forrester (1991). Some Considerations of Justice in Rural Health Care Delivery. In Charles V. Blatz (ed.), Ethics and Agriculture: An Anthology on Current Issues in World Context. University of Idaho Press.score: 148.5
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  49. Bansi Badan Mukhopadhyay (2007). Status of Patients and Physicians in Indian Scenario Its Improvement for Delivery of Better Health Care. In Ratna Dutta Sharma & Sashinungla (eds.), Patient-Physician Relationship. Distributed by D.K. Printworld.score: 148.5
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  50. Maximino Redondo, Francisco Rivas‐Ruiz, M. Carmen Guzman‐Soler & Carlos Labajos (2008). Monitoring Indicators of Health Care Quality by Means of a Hospital Register of Tumours. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 14 (6):1026-1030.score: 147.8
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