Search results for 'Delmas Kiernan-Lewis' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kiernan-Lewis Delmas (1994). Not Over Yet: Prior's 'Thank Goodness' Argument. In L. Nathan Oaklander & Quentin Smith (eds.), The New Theory of Time. Yale Up. 322--327.score: 300.0
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  2. Delmas Lewis (1987). Timelessness and Divine Agency. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 21 (3):143 - 159.score: 120.0
  3. David Lewis (1974). Spielman and Lewis on Inductive Immodesty. Philosophy of Science 41 (1):84-85.score: 120.0
  4. Delmas Lewis (1984). Eternity Again: A Reply to Stump and Kretzmann. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 15 (1/2):73 - 79.score: 120.0
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  5. Delmas Lewis (1988). Eternity, Time and Timelessness. Faith and Philosophy 5 (1):72-86.score: 120.0
    In this paper I argue that the classic concept of eternity, as it is presented in Boethius, Anselm and Aquinas, must be understood to involve not only the claim that all temporal things are epistemically present to God, but also the claim that all temporal things areexistentially present to God insofar as they coexist timelessly in the eternal present. I further argue that the concept of eternity requires a tenseless view of time. If this is correct then the existence of (...)
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  6. Delmas Lewis (1986). Persons, Morality, and Tenselessness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 47 (2):305-309.score: 120.0
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  7. Delmas Lewis (1983). Dualism and the Causal Theory of Memory. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 44 (September):21-30.score: 120.0
  8. Delmas Lewis (1982). On Salmon's Attempt to Redesign the Design Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):77 - 84.score: 120.0
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  9. Delmas Lewis (1986). Prior's 'Thank Goodness' Argument: A Reply to Hardin. Philosophy 61 (237):404 - 407.score: 120.0
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  10. Paul Griffiths & Delmas Lewis (1983). On Grading Religions, Seeking Truth, and Being Nice to People: A Reply to Professor Hick. Religious Studies 19 (1):75 - 80.score: 120.0
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  11. D. M. Lewis (1973). Naphtali Lewis: Greek Historical Documents: The Fifth Century B.C. Pp. Xii+125. Toronto: Hakkert, 1971. Paper, $2.25. The Classical Review 23 (02):283-284.score: 120.0
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  12. Delmas Lewis, Paul Griffiths & Paul Griffeths (1984). Wainwright on Mysticism. Religious Studies 20 (2):293 - 304.score: 120.0
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  13. Paul Cartledge, W. M. Calder Iii, R. S. Smith, J. Vaio & George Cornewall Lewis (2003). Teaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried MüllerTeaching the English Wissenschaft. The Letters of Sir George Cornewall Lewis to Karl Otfried Muller. Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:262.score: 120.0
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  14. D. W. Hamlyn, Clarence Irving Lewis, John D. Goheen & John L. Mothershead (1972). Collected Papers of Clarence Irving Lewis. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (86):68.score: 120.0
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  15. Frank Jackson, Graham Priest & David Lewis (2004). How Many Lives Has Schrodinger's Cat? The Estate of David Kellogg Lewis. Thanks for Valuable Comments Are Due to David Albert, DM Armstrong, Phillip Bricker, Jeremy Butterfield, David Chalmers, John Collins, Adam Elga, Alan Hajek, Richard Hanley, Rae Langton, Peter Lewis, Stephanie Lewis, Barry Loewer, Jonathan Schaffer, Bas van Fraassen, Steven Weinstein, and Sam Wheeler. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):3-22.score: 120.0
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  16. C. S. Lewis (1991). Lewis Explains His Reasons for Distrusting the so-Called. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):541-542.score: 120.0
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  17. C. S. Lewis (1991). Letter From Lewis to Mr and Mrs Sheldon Vanauken. The Chesterton Review 17 (3/4):538-539.score: 120.0
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  18. H. A. Lewis (1973). Modal Logic: The Lewis‐Modal Systems. Philosophical Books 14 (3):33-34.score: 120.0
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  19. Hywel David Lewis, Stewart R. Sutherland & T. A. Roberts (eds.) (1989). Religion, Reason, and the Self: Essays in Honour of Hywel D. Lewis. University of Wales Press.score: 120.0
     
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  20. Clarence Irving Lewis & Paul Arthur Schilpp (eds.) (1968). The Philosophy of C. I. Lewis. La Salle, Ill.,Open Court.score: 120.0
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  21. Delmas Lewis (1983). The Problem with the Problem of Evil. Sophia 22 (1):26-35.score: 120.0
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  22. David Lewis (2000). Causation as Influence. Journal of Philosophy 97 (4):182-197.score: 90.0
  23. David Lewis (1981). Are We Free to Break the Laws? Theoria 47 (3):113-21.score: 90.0
    I insist that I was able to raise my hand, and I acknowledge that a law would have been broken had I done so, but I deny that I am therefore able to break a law. To uphold my instance of soft determinism, I need not claim any incredible powers. To uphold the compatibilism that I actually believe, I need not claim that such powers are even possible. My incompatibilist opponent is a creature of fiction, but he has his prototypes (...)
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  24. David Lewis (1969). Lucas Against Mechanism. Philosophy 44 (June):231-3.score: 90.0
  25. David Lewis (1979). Lucas Against Mechanism II. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (June):373-6.score: 90.0
  26. Delmas Kiernan-Lewis (1991). Not Over Yet: Prior's 'Thank Goodness' Argument. Philosophy 66 (256):241 - 243.score: 29.0
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  27. Jessica M. Wilson (forthcoming). Hume's Dictum and Metaphysical Modality: Lewis's Combinatorialism. In Barry Loewer & Jonathan Schaffer (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to David Lewis. Blackwell.score: 21.0
    Many contemporary philosophers accept Hume's Dictum (HD), according to which there are no metaphysically necessary connections between distinct, intrinsically typed entities. Tacit in Lewis's work is a potential motivation for HD, according to which one should accept HD as presupposed by the best account of the range of metaphysical possibilities---namely, a combinatorial account, applied to spatiotemporal fundamentalia. Here I elucidate and assess this Ludovician motivation for HD. After refining HD and surveying its key, recurrent role in Lewis’s work, I present (...)
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  28. L. Nathan Oaklander (1987). Delams Lewis on Persons and Responsibility. Philosophy Research Archives 13:181-187.score: 21.0
    Delmas Lewis has argued that the tenseless view of time is committed to a view of personal identity according to which no one can be held morally responsible for their actions. His argument, if valid, is a serious objection to the tenseless view. The purpose of this paper is to defend the detenser by pointing out the pitfalls in Lewis’ argument.
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  29. Phillip Bricker (2006). David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds. In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing.score: 18.0
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  30. Robert Stalnaker (2004). Lewis on Intentionality. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):199 – 212.score: 18.0
    David Lewis's account of intentionality is a version of what he calls 'global descriptivism'. The rough idea is that the correct interpretation of one's total theory is the one (among the admissible interpretations) that come closest to making it true. I give an exposition of this account, as I understand it, and try to bring out some of its consequences. I argue that there is a tension between Lewis's global descriptivism and his rejection of a linguistic account of the intentionality (...)
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  31. Joseph A. Baltimore (2011). Lewis' Modal Realism and Absence Causation. Metaphysica 12 (2):117-124.score: 18.0
    A major criticism of David Lewis’ counterfactual theory of causation is that it allows too many things to count as causes, especially since Lewis allows, in addition to events, absences to be causes as well. Peter Menzies has advanced this concern under the title “the problem of profligate causation.” In this paper, I argue that the problem of profligate causation provides resources for exposing a tension between Lewis’ acceptance of absence causation and his modal realism. The result is a different (...)
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  32. Dan López de Sa (2014). Lewis Vs Lewis on the Problem of the Many. Synthese 191 (6):1105-1117.score: 18.0
    Consider a cat on a mat. On the one hand, there seems to be just one cat, but on the other there seem to be many things with as good a claim as anything in the vicinity to being a cat. Hence, the problem of the many. In his ‘Many, but Almost One,’ David Lewis offered two solutions. According to the first, only one of the many is indeed a cat, although it is indeterminate exactly which one. According to the (...)
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  33. Joshua Seachris & Linda Zagzebski (2007). Weighing Evils: The C. S. Lewis Approach. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (2):81 - 88.score: 18.0
    It is often argued that the great quantity of evil in our world makes God’s existence less likely than a lesser quantity would, and this, presumably, because the probability that some evils are gratuitous increases as the overall quantity of evil increases. Often, an additive approach to quantifying evil is employed in such arguments. In this paper, we examine C. S. Lewis’ objection to the additive approach, arguing that although he is correct to reject this approach, there is a sense (...)
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  34. Peter Menzies (1989). Probabilistic Causation and Causal Processes: A Critique of Lewis. Philosophy of Science 56 (4):642-663.score: 18.0
    This paper examines a promising probabilistic theory of singular causation developed by David Lewis. I argue that Lewis' theory must be made more sophisticated to deal with certain counterexamples involving pre-emption. These counterexamples appear to show that in the usual case singular causation requires an unbroken causal process to link cause with effect. I propose a new probabilistic account of singular causation, within the framework developed by Lewis, which captures this intuition.
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  35. Michael McGlone, Lewis on What Puzzling Pierre Does Not Believe.score: 18.0
    In “What Puzzling Pierre Does not Believe”, Lewis ([4], 412‐4) argues that the sentences (1) Pierre believes that London is pretty and (2) Pierre believes that London is not pretty both truly describe Kripke’s well‐known situation involving puzzling Pierre ([3]). Lewis also argues that this situation is not one according to which Pierre believes either the proposition (actually) expressed by (3) London is pretty or the proposition (actually) expressed by (4) London is not pretty. These claims, Lewis suggests, provide a (...)
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  36. Alexander Bird (2008). The Epistemological Argument Against Lewis's Regularity View of Laws. Philosophical Studies 138 (1):73–89.score: 18.0
    I argue for the claim that if Lewis’s regularity theory of laws were true, we could not know any positive law statement to be true. Premise 1: According to that theory, for any law statement true of the actual world, there is always a nearby world where the law statement is false (a world that differs with respect to one matter of particular fact). Premise 2: One cannot know a proposition to be true if it is false in a nearby (...)
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  37. Barry Maguire (2013). Defending David Lewis's Modal Reduction. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):129-147.score: 18.0
    David Lewis claims that his theory of modality successfully reduces modal items to nonmodal items. This essay will clarify this claim and argue that it is true. This is largely an exercise within ‘Ludovician Polycosmology’: I hope to show that a certain intuitive resistance to the reduction and a set of related objections misunderstand the nature of the Ludovician project. But these results are of broad interest since they show that would-be reductionists have more formidable argumentative resources than is often (...)
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  38. S. Oakley (2006). Defending Lewis's Local Miracle Compatibilism. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):337-349.score: 18.0
    Helen Beebee has recently argued that David Lewis’s account of compatibilism, so-called local miracle compatibilism (LMC), allows for the possibility that agents in deterministic worlds have the ability to break or cause the breaking of a law of nature. Because Lewis’s LMC allows for this consequence, Beebee claims that LMC is untenable and subsequently that Lewis’s criticism of van Inwagen’s Consequence Argument for incompatibilism is substantially weakened. I review Beebee’s argument against Lewis’s thesis and argue that Beebee has not (...)
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  39. Bruno Verbeek (2008). Conventions and Moral Norms: The Legacy of Lewis. Topoi 27 (1-2):73-86.score: 18.0
    David Lewis’ Convention has been a major source of inspiration for philosophers and social scientists alike for the analysis of norms. In this essay, I demonstrate its usefulness for the analysis of some moral norms. At the same time, conventionalism with regards to moral norms has attracted sustained criticism. I discuss three major strands of criticism and propose how these can be met. First, I discuss the criticism that Lewis conventions analyze norms in situations with no conflict of interest, whereas (...)
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  40. Charles Pigden & Rebecca E. B. Entwisle (2012). Spread Worlds, Plenitude and Modal Realism: A Problem for David Lewis. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor.score: 18.0
    In his metaphysical summa of 1986, The Plurality of Worlds, David Lewis famously defends a doctrine he calls ‘modal realism’, the idea that to account for the fact that some things are possible and some things are necessary we must postulate an infinity possible worlds, concrete entities like our own universe, but cut off from us in space and time. Possible worlds are required to account for the facts of modality without assuming that modality is primitive – that there are (...)
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  41. Charles Pigden (2007). Desiring to Desire: Russell, Lewis and G.E.Moore. In Susana Nuccetelli & Gary Seay (eds.), Themes from G.E.Moore. Oxford University Press. 244-260.score: 18.0
    I have two aims in this paper. In §§2-4 I contend that Moore has two arguments (not one) for the view that that ‘good’ denotes a non-natural property not to be identified with the naturalistic properties of science and common sense (or, for that matter, the more exotic properties posited by metaphysicians and theologians). The first argument, the Barren Tautology Argument (or the BTA), is derived, via Sidgwick, from a long tradition of anti-naturalist polemic. But the second argument, the Open (...)
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  42. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2002). Lewis' Strawman. Philosophical Quarterly 52 (206):55-65.score: 18.0
    In a survey of his views in the philosophy of mind, David Lewis criticizes much recent work in the field by attacking an imaginary opponent, Strawman. His case against Strawman focuses on four central theses which Lewis takes to be widely accepted among contemporary philosophers of mind. These theses concerns (1) the language of thought hypothesis and its relation to folk psychology, (2) narrow content, (3) de se content, and (4) rationality. We respond to Lewis, arguing (among other things) that (...)
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  43. Melinda Robert (1983). Lewis's Theory of Personal Identity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 61 (March):58-67.score: 18.0
    David lewis has argued that--Despite the 'fission' cases--One may consistently hold both that what matters in survival is "mental continuity and connectedness" and that what matters in survival is identity. To prove his point, He produces a certain theory of persons. Derek parfit and penelope maddy have objected that the theory lewis produces does not actually have the advantages he claims for it. In this paper, The author questions their objections, And then argues that, Even though lewis's theory has many (...)
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  44. Michael J. Raven (2013). Is Lewis's Mixed Theory Mixed Up? Theoria 79 (1):57-75.score: 18.0
    My aim is to rekindle interest in David Lewis's (1983) infamous but neglected Mixed Theory of mental states. The Mixed Theory is a mix of physicalism and functionalism designed to capture the intuitions that both Martians and abnormal human Madmen can be in pain. The Mixed Theory is widely derided. But I offer a new development of the Mixed Theory immune to its most prominent objections. In doing so, I uncover a new motivation for the Mixed Theory: its unique ability (...)
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  45. Robert K. Meyer (2008). Ai, Me and Lewis (Abelian Implication, Material Equivalence and C I Lewis 1920). Journal of Philosophical Logic 37 (2):169 - 181.score: 18.0
    C I Lewis showed up Down Under in 2005, in e-mails initiated by Allen Hazen of Melbourne. Their topic was the system Hazen called FL (a Funny Logic), axiomatized in passing in Lewis 1921. I show that FL is the system MEN of material equivalence with negation. But negation plays no special role in MEN. Symbolizing equivalence with → and defining ∼A inferentially as A→f, the theorems of MEN are just those of the underlying theory ME of pure material equivalence. (...)
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  46. Joel Isaac (2006). Why Not Lewis? Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (1):54-60.score: 18.0
    This is a discussion of Murray Murphey on the philosophy of C.I. Lewis and his relation to the pragmatist tradition.
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  47. Jelle de Boer (2012). A Strawson–Lewis Defence of Social Preferences. Economics and Philosophy 28 (3):291-310.score: 18.0
    This paper examines a special kind of social preference, namely a preference to do one's part in a mixed-motive setting because the other party expects one to do so. I understand this expectation-based preference as a basic reactive attitude (Strawson 1974). Given this, and the fact that expectations in these circumstances are likely to be based on other people's preferences, I argue that in cooperation a special kind of equilibrium ensues, which I call a loop, with people's preferences and expectations (...)
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  48. Kam Sing Leung & R. E. Jennings (2005). A Deontic Counterpart of Lewis's S1. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 46 (2):217-230.score: 18.0
    In this paper we investigate nonnormal modal systems in the vicinity of the Lewis system S1. It might be claimed that Lewis's modal systems (S1, S2, S3, S4, and S5) are the starting point of modern modal logics. However, our interests in the Lewis systems and their relatives are not (merely) historical. They possess certain syntactical features and their frames certain structural properties that are of interest to us. Our starting point is not S1, but a weaker logic S1 (S1 (...)
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  49. Dan López de Sa (2013). Lewis Vs Lewis on the Problem of the Many. Synthese 191 (6):1-13.score: 18.0
    Consider a cat on a mat. On the one hand, there seems to be just one cat, but on the other there seem to be many things with as good a claim as anything in the vicinity to being a cat. Hence, the problem of the many. In his ‘Many, but Almost One,’ David Lewis offered two solutions. According to the first, only one of the many is indeed a cat, although it is indeterminate exactly which one. According to the (...)
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  50. Rodica Albu (2010). C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 5 (15):110-116.score: 18.0
    C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man HarperCollins Publishers, New York, 2001.
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