8 found
Sort by:
  1. Christophe Schmeltzer & Denis J. Hilton (2013). To Do or Not to Do? A Cognitive Consistency Model for Drawing Conclusions From Conditional Instructions and Advice. Thinking and Reasoning 20 (1):16-50.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David R. Mandel, Denis J. Hilton & Patrizia Catellani (eds.) (2005). The Psychology of Counterfactual Thinking. Routledge.
    It is human nature to wonder how things might have turned out differently--either for the better or for the worse. For the past two decades psychologists have been intrigued by this phenomenon, which they call counterfactual thinking. Specifically, researchers have sought to answer the "big" questions: Why do people have such a strong propensity to generate counterfactuals, and what functions does counterfactual thinking serve? What are the determinants of counterfactual thinking, and what are its adaptive and psychological consequences? This important (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Jean-Francois Bonnefon & Denis J. Hilton (2002). The Suppression of Modus Ponens as a Case of Pragmatic Preconditional Reasoning. Thinking and Reasoning 8 (1):21 – 40.
    The suppression of the Modus Ponens inference is described as a loss of confidence in the conclusion C of an argument ''If A1 then C; If A2 then C; A1'' where A2 is a requirement for C to happen. It is hypothesised that this loss of confidence is due to the derivation of the conversational implicature ''there is a chance that A2 might not be satisfied'', and that different syntactic introductions of the requirement A2 (e.g., ''If C then A2'') will (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Denis J. Hilton (2001). Is the Challenge for Psychologists to Return to Behaviourism? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):415-416.
    I suggest that contemporary economics shares many of the characteristics of methodological behaviourism in psychology, with its emphasis on the influence of motivation, learning, and situational incentives on behaviour, and minimal interest in the details of the cognitive processes that transform input (information) into output (behaviour). The emphasis on these characteristics has the same strengths and weaknesses in economics as in behaviourist psychology.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Denis J. Hilton (1996). Mental Models and Causal Explanation: Judgements of Probable Cause and Explanatory Relevance. Thinking and Reasoning 2 (4):273 – 308.
    Good explanations are not only true or probably true, but are also relevant to a causal question. Current models of causal explanation either only address the question of the truth of an explanation, or do not distinguish the probability of an explanation from its relevance. The tasks of scenario construction and conversational explanation are distinguished, which in turn shows how scenarios can interact with conversational principles to determine the truth and relevance of explanations. The proposed model distinguishes causal discounting from (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Denis J. Hilton (ed.) (1988). Contemporary Science and Natural Explanation: Commonsense Conceptions of Causality. New York University Press.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Denis J. Hilton (1988). Introduction, Images of Science and Commonsense Explanation. In , Contemporary Science and Natural Explanation: Commonsense Conceptions of Causality. New York University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Denis J. Hilton (1988). Logic and Causal Attribution. In , Contemporary Science and Natural Explanation: Commonsense Conceptions of Causality. New York University Press.
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation